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1. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
2. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
3. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
4. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
14. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
15. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
16. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
17. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
18. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
19. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
21. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
22. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
23. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
24. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
25. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
35. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
36. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
37. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
38. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
39. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
40. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
42. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
43. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
44. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
45. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
46. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
56. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
57. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
58. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
59. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
60. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
61. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
63. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
64. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
65. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
66. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
67. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
77. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
78. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
79. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
80. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
81. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
82. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
84. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
85. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
86. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
87. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
88. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
98. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
99. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
100. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
101. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
102. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
103. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
105. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
106. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
107. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
108. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
109. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
115. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
119. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
120. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
121. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
122. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
123. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
124. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
126. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
127. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
128. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
129. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
130. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
136. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
140. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
141. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
142. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
143. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
144. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
145. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
147. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
148. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
149. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
150. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
151. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
157. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
161. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
162. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
163. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
164. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
165. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
166. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
168. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
169. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
170. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
171. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
172. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
178. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
182. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
183. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
184. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
185. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
186. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
187. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
189. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
190. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
191. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
192. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
193. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
199. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
203. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
204. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
205. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
206. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
207. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
208. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
210. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
211. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
212. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
213. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
214. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
220. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
224. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
225. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
226. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
227. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
228. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
229. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
231. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
232. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
233. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
234. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
235. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
241. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
245. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
246. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
247. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
248. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
249. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
250. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
252. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
253. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
254. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
255. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
256. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
262. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
266. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
267. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
268. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
269. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
270. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
271. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
273. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
274. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
275. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
276. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
277. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
283. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
287. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
288. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
289. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
290. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
291. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
292. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
294. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
295. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
296. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
297. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
298. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
304. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
308. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
309. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
310. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
311. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
312. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
313. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
315. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure
316. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
317. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
318. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
319. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gateway International Painting Competition - Online
$1,000 cash to Best in Show. Deadline: Sep 30, 2017
Enclosure
325. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Valdosta National 2018 - Valdosta, GA
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: Nov 6, 2017
Enclosure
329. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bethesda Studio Space Available
Date: 21 September 2017, 4:30 am
Studio B, located just a short stroll from the Bethesda Metro, features workspace for local artists. The studio includes exhibit space in each individual artist studio, as well as on the main wall. Studio B has retail hours as well as hours by appointment. 

AVAILABLE STUDIO INFORMATION
  • Studio is 185 sq. feet 
  • Rent is $295 per month, inclusive of all utilities.
  • Artists are required to be in the space during retail hours of Tues. – Fri., 1-6pm and during the monthly opening receptions.
  • Artist has 24/7 access to Studio B and their personal studio space.
  • Artist may sell artwork and there is no commission taken on artist sales.

TO APPLY
Complete the application and submit the following:
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Artwork Samples
  • Proof of Income
  • Proof of Identity


Deadline: Friday, October 20, 2017

Application Fee: Free

Enclosure
330. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call to Artists and Galleries
Date: 20 September 2017, 4:00 am
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.


The City of Alexandria is purchasing original art to add to the City’s art collection and to display in City-owned buildings.  Artists, art galleries, and art consultants working or residing in Alexandria and the Washington, DC area are encouraged to respond to this call.Project Overview:  The Alexandria Art Purchase Awards call will be held biannually for the next four years, totaling eight calls with each call purchasing up to $4000 in artwork.  For this first call, the concept of “Neighborhoods and Gathering Places” must be conveyed in the artwork submitted.  Each call will be in three phases.
  • Phase one:  Artists submit applications online. The Art Purchase Awards project task force reviews artist applications and selects artwork to be considered for purchase awards.
  • Phase two:  Artwork considered for purchase is displayed at City Hall for three months.  Community engagement will be encouraged throughout the process.
  • Phase three:  The task force makes their purchase recommendations to the Alexandria Commission for the Arts.  After approval by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts, the purchase award(s) will be announced at a reception at City Hall.  Each artist chosen for the exhibition at City Hall but not given a purchase award will receive an honorarium of $100.
Application Deadline:  Sunday, October 1, 2017, before midnight.
Eligibility:  Applicants must be 18 years or older and reside or work in Virginia, Maryland, or Washington, DC.  Artists, galleries, art consultants are eligible to submit original art.
Submissions All artwork submitted must be original, available for purchase, and made within the last 5 years.  Artwork must be two-dimensions and ready to hang on a wall.  Artists are allowed to submit up to five (5) works of art for consideration.  Art galleries and art consultants are allowed to submit up to (5) works of art from any combination of two (2) or more represented artists.  The pricing of artwork must include framed and unframed options.  The City reserves the right to negotiate the final price.
Artist Statement:  In one or two paragraphs, give a first person description of the artist’s approach to their art.
Letter of Interest:  In one or two paragraphs, describe how the artwork submitted expresses the concept of neighborhoods and gathering places. 
Resume:  Include a two-page artist resume.
Selection Process:  Appointed by the Alexandria Commission for the Arts (ACA), a five-member project task force made up of two ACA representatives, two community stakeholders, and one project stakeholder will review applications submitted on CaFE and choose the artwork being considered for purchase to be displayed for three months at City Hall.  After three months of community engagement and in coordination with City staff, the project task force will make their purchase award(s) recommendation(s) to the ACA.  The ACA will then vote on the purchase award(s) at their monthly meeting. 
Enclosure
331. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Bootcamp for Artists Coming later this month!
Date: 19 September 2017, 5:32 am

Early heads up!


On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


This seminar always books up very quickly!


3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863


This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



The seminar, which has been taken by over 6,000 artists and arts professionals from all over the Mid Atlantic is designed to deliver information, data and proven tactics to allow artists to develop and sustain a career in the fine arts.

Sometimes called "Boot Camp for Artists" by the attendees, people as far as Arizona, California, New York and South Carolina have attended, including many, many university level art professionals.

In its seven hour format compressed into 2.5 hours, the seminar covers a wide range of structured issues including:

1. Materials - Buying materials; strategies for lowering your costs, where and how to get it, etc.

2. Presentation – How to properly present your artwork including Conservation issues, Archival Matting and Framing, Longevity of materials, a discussion on Limited editions, signing and numbering, Prints vs. Reproduction, discussion on Iris Prints (Pros and Cons).

3. Creating a resume - Strategy for building your art resume, including how to write one, what should be in it, presentation, etc.

4. Juried Shows – An Insider's view and strategy to get in the competitions.

5. How to take slides and photographs of your artwork

6. Selling your art – A variety of avenues to actually selling your artwork, including fine arts festivals, corporate acquisitions, galleries, public arts, etc.

7. Creating a Body of Works

8. How to write a news release

9. Publicity – How to get in newspapers, magazines, etc. Plus handouts on email and addresses of newspaper critics, writers, etc.

10. Galleries – Discussion on area galleries including Vanity Galleries, Co-Operatives, Commercial Galleries, Non-profit Art spaces, etc.

11. How to approach a gallery – Realities of the business, Contracts, Gallery/Artist Relationship, Agents.

12. Outdoor Art Festivals – Discussion and advice on how to sell outwork at fine arts festivals, which to do, which to avoid, etc.

13. Resources - Display systems and tents, best juried shows and ones to avoid.

14. Accepting Credit cards – How to set up your art business.

15. Grants – Discussion on how to get grants in DC, Regional and National, including handouts on who and where and when.

16. Alternative Marketing - Cable TV, Local media

17. Internet – How to build your website at no cost, how to establish a wide and diverse Internet presence.


18. Art fairs
Enclosure
332. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize winner announced!
Date: 7 September 2017, 5:55 am
The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried art competition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, celebrated its 15th anniversary and announced the 2017 prize winners last night during the exhibition’s opening. Larry Cook from Landover Hills, MD was awarded “Best in Show” and received the $10,000 top prize; Cindy Cheng from Baltimore, MD was named second place and given $2,000; Renée Rendine from Towson, MD was bestowed third place and received $1,000; and Giulia Livi from Baltimore, MD received the $1,000 young artist award.


Winner Larry Cook_with Catherine Leggett, Carol Trawick and Catriona Fraser
Larry Cook has shown his work in various group and solo exhibitions throughout the region. His work was included in group shows including It Takes A Nation at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C.,To Be Black in White America at Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, MD and How We Lost DC at Honfleur Gallery in Washington, D.C. Cook’s solo exhibits have been shown at Hamiltonian Gallery, (e)merge art fair, and Pleasant Plains Workshop in Washington, D.C. He received his Master of Fine Arts from George Washington University. He is a visual art teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, MD. Cook was the 2014 Trawick Prize Young Artist Award Winner, a Hamiltonian Fellow from 2013-2015 and a finalist for the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2013 and 2016.  

2017 Trawick Prize Finalists


Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Larry Cook, Landover Hills, MD
Amy Finkelstein, Takoma Park, MD
Helen Glazer, Owings Mills, MD
Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD
Michele Montalbano, Burke, VA
Ben Piwowar, Baltimore, MD
Renée Rendine, Towson, MD
 


The exhibit opening celebrated the talented finalists as well as recognized Carol Trawick for her generous and gracious support of the competition for the past 15 years. Established by Ms. Trawick in 2003, The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists.
 
A longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, Ms. Trawick has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation was established in 2007 after the Trawicks sold their successful information technology company. A former teacher and entrepreneur, Ms. Trawick remains engaged in a range of philanthropic causes through the Foundation, which was established to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits.
 
The work of the finalists will be on exhibit at Gallery B, 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E, until September 30. The public opening reception will be Friday, September 8 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
Entries were juried by Zoë Charlton, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor at American University; Neil Feather, Maryland-based artist and former winner of the Sondheim Art Prize and The Trawick Prize and Elizabeth Mead, Art Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Art History at William & Mary.
 
To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $205,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Cleaver, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015 and Lauren Adams, 2016.
Enclosure
333. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Hispanic Heritage Month at the National Portrait Gallery
Date: 4 September 2017, 11:42 am
The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery recognizes Hispanic Heritage Month with programs and events highlighting the Hispanic artists and subjects who are represented in the museum’s collection. With the goal of opening a dialogue about these individuals’ remarkable contributions to American history, this bilingual celebration will offer insight into the ways in which Latino cultures, traditions and stories have helped shape this country’s history.

The month-long series of events includes a special Family Day hosted at the museum Sept. 30. Featuring live music, curator talks and art activities, Family Day welcomes visitors of all ages. Participants will have the opportunity to join Taína Caragol for a special Spanish-language tour of “The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now.” Caragol, a co-curator of the special exhibition, is the museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History.

As part of the museum’s initiative to become fully bilingual (English and Spanish) by 2018, the Portrait Gallery currently has five dual-language exhibitions. When the museum’s “must see” exhibition, “America’s Presidents,” reopens to the public Sept. 22 after extensive renovations, the new exhibition will be entirely bilingual and accessible. A highlight of the Portrait Gallery since the museum’s public opening in 1968, this historic display on the museum’s second floor is the only place outside the White House where visitors can view a complete collection of presidential portraits. “America’s Presidents” includes extraordinary works of art, most notably Gilbert Stuart’s “Lansdowne” portrait of President George Washington, which will be back on view after 18 months of careful conservation and analysis.

In addition to the special events in the Portrait Gallery, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the museum will have on view 26 portraits by Latino artists or of Latino sitters, including Rudolfo Anaya, Teresa Carreño, Marisol Escobar, Frida Kahlo, Pedro Martínez, Antonia Pantoja, Chita Rivera, Geraldo Rivera, Clemente Soto Vélez, Antonio Martorell and Piri Thomas.
Enclosure
334. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Snowy Day stamps
Date: 3 September 2017, 9:12 am
The US Postal Service is going to issue The Snowy Day Forever stamps that are based on an award-winning children’s book by artist, illustrator and writer Ezra Jack Keats.


 





 

 
The Snowy Day, published in 1962, was one of the first mainstream publications to feature an African American child. It received the Caldecott Medal in 1963.
 
The stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop at this link for delivery shortly after the Oct. 4 nationwide issuance. 




#SnowyDayStamps.
Enclosure
336. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 30 August 2017, 12:53 pm
Deadline: September 16, 2017

The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. announces a call to artists for a juried art exhibition, November 19, 2017 - January 6, 2018 at The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD. 

Approximately $7,000 in awards. Juror: Thomas Hipschen. 

Original works in any traditional media, prints from original plates, sculptures. Crafts and art works produced by photographic, giclee, laser or digital techniques NOT accepted. 

Overall area of image must not exceed 25 sq. inches (156 sq cm). Outside dimension of frame must not exceed 56 sq. inches (360 sq. cm). Sculpture may not exceed 6 inches (15 cm) in any direction including the base. 

Entry fees vary (See prospectus). More info (PDF), go to: https://www.mpsgs.org/MPSGS-2017_Prospectus.pdf Contact: entries%20listed%20on%20Artshow.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">nancy@miniartsupply.biz or LRychlec@gmail.com or call 301-977-2190 or 301-987-6779. https://www.mpsgs.org/
Enclosure