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1. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

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2. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

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4. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
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5. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
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6. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
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12. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
13. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
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14. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
15. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
16. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
17. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
18. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
19. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
20. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
21. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
22. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
23. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
24. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
http://facebook.com/turbulence.org

Follow us on Twitter:
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Enclosure
25. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
http://facebook.com/turbulence.org

Follow us on Twitter:
http://twitter.com/turbulenceorg

Enclosure
27. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
28. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
29. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
35. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
36. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
37. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
38. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
39. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
40. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
41. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
42. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
43. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
44. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
45. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
46. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
47. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
http://facebook.com/turbulence.org

Follow us on Twitter:
http://twitter.com/turbulenceorg

Enclosure
48. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
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Follow us on Twitter:
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Enclosure
50. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
51. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
52. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
58. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
59. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
60. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
61. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
62. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
63. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
64. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
65. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
66. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
67. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
68. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
69. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
70. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
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Enclosure
71. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
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Follow us on Twitter:
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Enclosure
73. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
74. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
75. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
81. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
82. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
83. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
84. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
85. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
86. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
87. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
88. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
89. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
90. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
91. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
92. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
93. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
http://facebook.com/turbulence.org

Follow us on Twitter:
http://twitter.com/turbulenceorg

Enclosure
94. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

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Enclosure
96. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
97. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
98. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
104. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
105. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
106. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
107. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
108. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
109. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
110. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
111. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
112. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
113. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
114. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
115. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
116. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

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Enclosure
117. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

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Enclosure
119. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
120. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
121. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
127. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
128. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
129. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
130. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
131. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
132. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
133. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
134. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
135. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
136. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
137. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
138. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
139. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

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Enclosure
140. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

Turbulence.org
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Follow us on Twitter:
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Enclosure
142. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
143. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
144. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
150. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
151. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
152. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
153. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
154. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
155. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
156. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
157. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
158. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
159. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
160. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
161. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
162. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

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Enclosure
163. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

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Enclosure
165. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
166. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
167. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
173. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
174. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
175. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
176. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
177. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
178. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
179. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
180. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
181. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
182. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
183. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
184. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
185. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

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Enclosure
186. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

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Follow us on Twitter:
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Enclosure
188. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
189. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
190. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
196. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
197. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
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198. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
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199. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
200. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
201. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
202. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
203. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
204. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
205. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
206. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
207. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
208. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
http://facebook.com/turbulence.org

Follow us on Twitter:
http://twitter.com/turbulenceorg

Enclosure
209. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
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Follow us on Twitter:
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Enclosure
211. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
212. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
213. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
219. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
220. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
221. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
222. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
223. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
224. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
225. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
226. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
227. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
228. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
229. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
230. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
231. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
http://facebook.com/turbulence.org

Follow us on Twitter:
http://twitter.com/turbulenceorg

Enclosure
232. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
http://facebook.com/turbulence.org

Follow us on Twitter:
http://twitter.com/turbulenceorg

Enclosure
234. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
235. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
236. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
242. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
243. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
244. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
245. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
246. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
247. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
248. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
249. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
250. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
251. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
252. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
253. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
254. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

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Enclosure
255. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

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Follow us on Twitter:
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Enclosure
257. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
258. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
259. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
265. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
266. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
267. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
268. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
269. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
270. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
271. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
272. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
273. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
274. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
275. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
276. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
277. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

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Enclosure
278. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

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Enclosure
280. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
281. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
282. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
288. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
289. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
290. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
291. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
292. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
293. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
294. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
295. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
296. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
297. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
298. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
299. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
300. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

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Enclosure
301. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

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http://twitter.com/turbulenceorg

Enclosure
303. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
304. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
305. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
311. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
312. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
313. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
314. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
315. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
316. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
317. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
318. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
319. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
320. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
321. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
322. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naúl Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.
 
 
 
Bandits & Heros, Poets & Saints:
Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil
Curated by Marion E. Jackson, Ph.D. and Barbara Cervenka, O.P., Curators
Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints explores how the ancient cultures of Africa blended with indigenous and colonial Portuguese traditions to form the vibrant and complex cultural mosaic of modern Brazil. This eclectic collection of popular art—photography, sculptures, paintings, religious objects and books of poetry—depicts the vibrant culture of the Northeast of Brazil and the Nordestinos. The exhibition explores the coming together of diverse traditions of the region through work by historical and contemporary artists.
 
 
SAVE THE DATE
 
Opening Reception
June 18, 6-9 p.m.
Enclosure
323. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Flight Lines”
Date: 14 December 2015, 12:23 pm

Turbulence.org Commission: Flight Lines by Ellie Irons and Dan Phiffer:

Flight Lines is a computer vision project that monitors the sky not just for customary birds and planes, but rapidly multiplying drones and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Emerging from an interest in the ecology of the Anthropocene, Flight Lines is an effort to document the skies as they are today, with the knowledge that they are rapidly evolving and have variable characteristics in different locations at different times.

Irons and Phiffer have created a network of cameras across New York City. Each camera location has its own particular ’sky signature’ that is revealed through algorithmic processing, which would otherwise remain invisible. As you watch, your computer renders the videos into a series of silhouetted frames that trace the arcs of objects that move through them; birds, trash, flying machines. The paths generated by this process are its “flight lines.”

Watch the sky, or leave your browser window open while you attend to other tasks. Either way, you will accumulate hours of processed footage that will provide Irons and Phiffer with material for a series of paintings and videos that respond to this aerial ecology.

Flight Lines is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist and educator based in Brooklyn, NY. She works in a variety of media, from walks to WIFI to gardening, to reveal how human and nonhuman lives intertwine with other earth systems. Recently she has been an artist in residence at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred University.

Recent exhibition venues include Wave Hill, the Queens Botanical Garden, Pioneer Works and the Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture in New York City, Flora Arts and Nature in Bogotá, Colombia, and garden projects at Sure We Can, a redemption center in Bushwick, and 1067 PacificPeople, an art center in Crown Heights. Her recent writing is published in Feral Research, Landscape Architecture Futures, and the Brooklyn Rail.

Ellie teaches part time at the City College of New York and Brown University. She studied Environmental Science and Art at Scripps College in Los Angeles and received her MFA from Hunter College, CUNY.

Dan Phiffer is a new media hacker from California, interested in exploring the cultural dimension of inexpensive communications networks such as voice telephony and the Internet. Dan is currently a fellow at Columbia’s Tow Center of Digital Journalism, and has had projects exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and SFMOMA.

Ellie and Dan have collaborated on a variety of projects over the last ten years, including work with the collaborative group Future Archaeology and individual pieces ranging from public sculptural installations to web sites. They share an interest in the intertwining of technology, ecology, and public access to information.

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
http://facebook.com/turbulence.org

Follow us on Twitter:
http://twitter.com/turbulenceorg

Enclosure
324. Source: Networked_Performance
Item: Turbulence.org Commission: “Killbox” by Joseph DeLappe, et al
Date: 22 September 2015, 8:59 am

Turbulence.org Commission: Killbox by Joseph DeLappe (US) and Malath Abbas, Tom deMajo and Albert Elwin (UK) [To "play" the game download the application to your desktop, and make sure your speakers are on.]

Killbox is an online interactive game that critically explores the nature of drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV) warfare, its complexities and consequences. It is an experience that explores the use of technology to transform and extend political and military power, and the abstraction of killing through virtualization.

Modern warfare technology disguises the lethal nature of weapons as they become surgical precision instruments producing ‘clean’ destruction within acceptable limits of “collateral damage.” – Jill Berke*

“Killbox” is the Military term used to describe an area on a grid map that a mission planner designates a target to be destroyed. Kill Box involves audiences in a fictionalized virtual environment based on documented drone strikes in Northern Pakistan (executed via satellite from as far away as Las Vegas, Nevada).

The disintegration of the warrior’s personality is at a very advanced stage. Looking up, he sees the digital display (opto-electronic or holographic) of the windscreen collimator; looking down, the radar screen, the onboard computer, the radio and the video screen, which enables him to follow the terrain with its four or five simultaneous targets; and to monitor his self-navigating Sidewinder missiles fitted with a camera of infra-red guidance system. Paul Virilio **

Killbox is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts (USA). Additional funding has been provided by The Phoenix Theatre (Leicester, UK); and The Cutting Room (UK).

BIOGRAPHIES

Joseph DeLappe is an artist/activist with a substantial body of work on the subject of geopolitics and drones and is considered a pioneer in the nascent field of computer games and art. He is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Nevada where he directs the Digital Media program. Joseph is lead artist on Kill Box UAV; dealing with concept/content development, theoretical and historical research into drone warfare and primary lead on installation, development of publicity materials and archiving surrounding the project. Working with electronic and new media since 1983, his work in online gaming performance and electromechanical installation have been shown throughout the United States and abroad. In 2006 he began dead-in-iraq, typing consecutively all the names of America’s military casualties from the war in Iraq into the America’s Army first person shooter online recruiting game. DeLappe also created and directs the crowdsourced memorial project, iraqimemorial.org.

Malath Abbas is an independent game designer, artist and producer working on experimental and meaningful games. Since co-founding the award winning studio Quartic Llama, Malath is establishing Scotland’s first game collective and co-working space in order to support a community of independent game makers. His current work includes Kill Box, an online game and interactive installation that critically explores the nature of drone warfare, its complexities and consequences.

Tom deMajo is a digital artist, electronic musician and sound designer, and lead designer for project drone. Tom is responsible for unifying the conceptual, experiential, visual and audio aspects of the project, driving the aesthetics and sound in the game. Tom’s work has covered film, animation, games, sound installations and music. He has toured globally as part of electronic music duo Warp Technique, and is a co-founder of Quartic Llama; independent games company. He was designer, sound designer, composer and artist on the award- winning game “other” made with Malath Abbas and in partnership with the National Theatre Scotland. He has collaborated extensively with artists, practitioners and institutions in Scotland and locally such as National Theatre Scotland, Museum of Scotland, Sink, and recently Hot Chocolate and Scottish Dance Theatre. Tom has been regularly invited to contribute to NEoN Digital Arts Festival, and is Artist in Residence at Fleet Collective in Dundee.

Albert Elwin is an artist and programmer, responsible for developing the underlying code for the PD, networking and implementation of all art objects into the project. Originally from New Zealand, Albert now lives and works in Scotland. He studied Computer Games Technology at the University of Abertay Dundee and his career began when he took part in Abertay’s 2012 Dare To Be Digital competition. Albert co-founded Space Budgie, an independent games studio in 2013 where he lead the development of Glitchspace, a visual programming game, well known for its aesthetic and game design. Albert was invited to talk about Glitchspace at various international game festivals, most notably the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco in 2014. For the last 6 months Albert has been working on a wide range of projects and collaborations; developing digital experiments for testing human depth perception at St. Andrews University, an audio/visual digital instrument based on Harmonographs.

Related Works:

Commission Control by Andy Deck and Joe Dellinger (1997)
Here and Now by David Crawford (1999)
CONtext by Jo-Anne Green (2004)

* From “War on Words: How Language Obscures Violence”
** From “War and Cinema”

Turbulence.org
http://turbulence.org

“Like” us on Facebook:
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Follow us on Twitter:
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Enclosure
326. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 31st Annual Sculpture Celebration - Lenoir, NC
$11,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 10, 2016
Enclosure
327. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: The Nude Figure - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 9, 2016
Enclosure
328. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Fall Plein Air Event - Blue Ridge, GA
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 8, 2016
Enclosure
334. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: In Your Dreams - San Rafael, CA
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: August 19, 2016
Enclosure
335. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for Artists
Date: 22 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline August 1, 2016.


The Fitton Center for Creative Arts is accepting proposals in all media for solo and group exhibitions for 2017-2018. A community art center on the Great Miami River in arts-driven downtown Hamilton, Ohio, the Fitton Center provides experiences in the arts through exhibitions, classes, performances and other events. Four galleries provide 2,600 square feet of space. Solo artists generally are asked to exhibit 10 – 30 works, depending on scale, media and available space. We also offer group shows of existing guilds or organizations and for individuals willing to be selected into a curated group.


For full requirements, please contact Cathy Mayhugh, mailto:cathy@fittoncenter.org or visit http://www.fittoncenter.org, click on Exhibitions and download the Exhibition Proposal Form. 101 S. Monument Ave., Hamilton OH 45011, (513) 863-8873 ext. 122.
Enclosure
336. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Trawick Prize announces 2016 finalists
Date: 20 June 2016, 4:00 am
Award Winners to be Named during September Exhibit
 
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and the Bethesda Urban Partnership will showcase the work of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards eight finalists in a group exhibition. The exhibit will be on display August 31 – September 24, 2016, at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.

2016 Trawick Prize Finalists


Lauren Frances Adams, Baltimore, MD
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Leah Cooper, Baltimore, MD
Sarah Irvin, Springfield, VA
Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Ben Marcin, Baltimore, MD
Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD
William Wylie, Charlottesville, VA
 
The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit are Wednesday through Saturday, 12 – 6pm.
 
The 2016 Trawick Prize jury includes Stéphane Aquin, Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Hasan Elahi, Associate Professor, Department of Art at University of Maryland and Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
 
The Trawick Prize was established in 2003 by Carol Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda. She is the past Chair of both the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership, and also the Founder of the Bethesda Painting Awards. In 2007, Ms. Trawick founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County.

The Trawick Prize is one of the first regional competitions and largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded $192,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 130 regional artists. Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014 and Jonathan Monaghan, 2015. 
For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.
Enclosure
337. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Come to this opening tonight and get free artwork
Date: 18 June 2016, 6:30 am

You gotta come to this group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it... and there's free art involved... buah, ah, ah!


By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; and she is a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. 

The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.

At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.

Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.


The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).

The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work. And in a shameless act of free artwork distribution, I will be giving a free limited edition lithograph from a set of various lithos (you get to pick one) that I did in art school in the 1980s if you say: "Hi Lenny, where's my print?"

They are all signed and numbered in tiny editions... all circa 1977-1981.

The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.

See ya there! Don't forget to ask me for your free artwork!
Enclosure
338. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Artapedia.com: Launch of new DC Arts writing website
Date: 17 June 2016, 5:52 am
Day Eight is preparing to launch an ambitious new arts blog, Artapedia.com, focused on the D.C. area. Kay Kendall, Chair of the DC Commission on the Arts, and Michael Kaiser, past-president of the Kennedy Center, will be honorary hosts for a free celebration and launch event (rsvp required) Tuesday June 21 5:30-7:00.

The site is launching as part of the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. 2016 D.C. Arts Writing Fellows Jonelle Walker and Michelle Goldchain will cover anything and everything local and artistic. The project was developed to increase coverage of the local arts community and is produced through support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Humanities DC, Brink Media, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, and DCRE Residential.

In addition to writing coverage of arts and humanities activities the Fellows will facilitate a series of community events and receive structured and unstructured mentorship from journalists including Sarah Kaufman (Pulitzer 2010, chief dance critic Washington Post), Jeanette Catsoulis (Film critic, New York Times), and Maura Judkis (culture journalist, Washington Post.) 

Project Director Robert Bettmann said, “For centuries arts journalism has played a critical role in the practice and participation of the arts. With declines in quality coverage from the major news institutions publishers like Day Eight are trying to find new models.”

In celebration of launch of the Fellowship and website Day Eight will host a launch party Tuesday June 21 at BRINK (1516 U Street NW) from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; rsvp is required – space is limited.


About Arts Writing Fellow Jonelle Walker
Jonelle Walker is a 2016 DC Arts Writing Fellow with Day Eight. She is also a Theatre History and Performance Studies masters student at the University of Maryland, a freelance theatre writer, and the Artist-in-Residence and Literary Manager for Blind Pug Arts Collective. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Literature and Theatre Arts from American University in 2013.

About Arts Writing Fellow Michelle Goldchain
Michelle Goldchain is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and photographer who covers local news. She is currently one of the DC Arts Writing fellows with Day Eight. She is also Editor of Curbed DC, a real estate and development blog owned by Vox Media. Her works have been seen in Street Sense, Quill Magazine, Whurk Magazine, and Prince William Living Magazine.

About Arts Writing Fellowship Director Robert Bettmann
Robert Bettmann is an arts writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. He's founder of the arts magazine Bourgeon and the non-profit Day Eight. In the last year he's completed projects with funding from the DC Arts Commission and DC Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Arts. Robert is an artist himself, having transitioned into writing after a decade-long career as a performing artist. He trained on scholarship at the Washington Ballet and Alvin Ailey schools and performed modern dance and ballet. His book Somatic Ecology was published in 2009, and he is the editor of an arts anthology, Bourgeon: Fifty Artists Write About Their Work, published recently.

About Day Eight
The mission of Day Eight is to empower participation in the arts through the production, publication, and promotion of creative projects. The organization’s publication program includes the arts magazine Bourgeon, an annual arts writing competition for undergraduates, and the DC Arts Writing Fellowship. http://dayeight.org/

For additional information contact:
Robert Bettmann Robert@dayeight.org (202)210-2181 

Enclosure
339. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Annual Meeting/Party
Date: 17 June 2016, 4:00 am


Monday, June 27, 2016 at 7:00 PM 

Celebrating a year of Arts and Humanities in the District of Columbia.

Featuring performances and presentations by FY15 grant award recipients
Historic Lincoln Theatre
1215 U Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Presentations and Performances by:
Free Minds Book Club
Chloe Arnold and Maud Arnold
Sweater Set
Dana Flor
Spit Dat DC
CityDance
Washington Improv Theater
Levine Music
Story District
dog & pony dc
Hunt Laudi Studio
Admission is free, RSVPs are encouraged. RSVP here.
The Annual Meeting highlights the progress of the arts in 2015. The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities staff and grantees present an overview of the previous year's work and an outline for the future to the general public.

Join us for our rooftop networking social immediately
following the annual meeting at


Lost Society
2001 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
8:00 pm -10:00 pm (RSVP here)
Enclosure
340. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: The Looking Glass: Artist Immigrants of Washington
Date: 13 June 2016, 5:00 am


Let me plug an upcoming group show at American University’s Katzen Art Museum, since I am honored to be part of it. 



By the way, that gorgeous museum was built thanks to a major gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, he a brilliant collector of art who could teach lessons on how to collect; she a very talented artist with a refined eye for great artwork. The Katzen’s head honcho, Jack Rasmussen, continues to shame all other DMV museum directors and curators when it comes to them tending their own artistic back garden.


At the risk of repeating myself: most DMV museum curators would rather take a cab to Dulles Airport to fly to Berlin in order to visit an emerging artist’s studio than to take a cab to the Gateway Artists’ Studios, or to any area artists’ studios, to look at local artists.


Are you hearing me Stéphane Aquin? Taína Caragol? E. Carmen Ramos? Eleanor Jones Harvey?, etc. Learn to tend your own artistic back garden.




The show is titled The Looking Glass:  Artist Immigrants of Washington and it runs June 18–August 14, 2016. It is part of the amazing Alper Initiative for Washington Artists (if you don’t know what that it, and you are a DMV artist, you should! – contact the Katzen).



The opening is June 18 from 6-8PM. There will be plenty of adult beverages and munchies, and the artists will be there to talk about their work.




The exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years – primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity – and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region.



Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Ric Garcia, Los Santos, 2012.
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30.
Photo by Pete Duvall, Anything Photographic.
They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, Jose Ygnacio Bermudez, and yours truly from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from El Salvador/Honduras, Irene Clouthier from Mexico, and Naul Ojeda from Uruguay. They brought with them artistic traditions that took root and bore fruit here in the United States.


See ya there!
Enclosure
341. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Spokane Arts Commission call for submissions for the Chase Gallery
Date: 12 June 2016, 1:44 pm
Deadline:  September, 16 2016  - 5 PM PST     
    
The Chase Gallery submissions are open for the 2017 season and they are seeking artists of color for the Winter and Fall Exhibition schedules.



Winter: Spokane Arts Commission is seeking work from Artists of Color for the Winter exhibition schedule (January through March.) The reception will take place on the February Visual Arts Tour.


Identities of race and culture are fluid, ancient, or new. Whether your work directly addresses your cultural experience or not we are interested in sharing it with a wide audience.


The artwork will be selected by a diverse panel of jurors.


Apply entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3522" target="_blank">here.
Enclosure
342. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: New Pop Up Art Space
Date: 11 June 2016, 4:00 am
The DMV has a new rental pop up art space available... details below from the news release:
Bridging the gap between artists and collectors  
As an artist, I have found myself struggling to find the right place to showcase my artwork.  I know firsthand how truly frustrating it can be to not have any gallery representation and only have the opportunity to show in restaurants, coffee shops, and other venues that are not designed for the ambiance that pieces of art need to be fully appreciated. 
For that reason, I created White Cloud Pop-Up Art Space. In this space, walls, ceiling and floors are united in harmony by the purest white color. Combined with a generous amount of natural light, there is a clean, simple background to truly let your work stand out.
White Cloud is conveniently located in the heart of the U Street corridor, only 2 blocks from the U Street metro and within walking distance to some of DC’s most popular restaurants and coffee shops. All day and night, potential clients are just footsteps from the gallery.
In addition, White Cloud provides this amenities: 
•        Over 400 sq ft of art space
•        Heavy railing hanging picture system to easily hang and remove art
•        Track lighting to spotlight your pieces
•         Modern desk that can also be used as a service area
•         Nicely renovated bathroom
•         Fully functional HVAC unit
•         Large refrigerator and microwave 
Below is information on our Pricing and Frequently Asked Questions about the gallery. We look forward to working with you! 
Pricing:
Weekdays: (Monday through Thursday) $300 for two hour public show.  
This price also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and    remove pieces. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on the day of the show. All exhibitions must  end by 11 PM. 
Weekends: (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) $500 for two hour public show. This price   also includes two hours for set-up and one hour after closing to clean and remove  pieces.   Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by
11:00 PM 
Two-day weekend show: (Friday, Saturday, Sunday) $800.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM  on the first and second days of the show. Set-up can begin at 10 AM on any day of the   show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM.  
Full weekend show: (Friday through Sunday) $1000.  Set-up can begin at 10 AM on    any day of the show. All exhibitions must end by 11 PM. 
FAQS 
WHERE IS THE GALLERY LOCATED?
Our address is at  1843 14th street NW 2nd floor, Washington DC, at the corner of 14th
and T St NW. 
WHAT ARE THE GALLERY HOURS?
White Cloud opens at 11 AM. Until 7pm, but better to make an appointment first. 
CAN I TOUR THE STUDIO BEFORE RENTING IT?
Of course!  White Cloud Gallery can occasionally accommodate walk-in tours, but it’s  always best to schedule an appointment. Give Miguel a call . 
WHAT IF I NEED MORE TIME TO SET UP OR REMOVE MY ART?
No problem. I’m happy to work with you. This is negotiable. 
IS THERE A SERVICE ELEVATOR?
White Cloud Gallery is on the second floor of the building and we do not have a service  elevator - please come prepared to carry any equipment/props up a flight of stairs.
WHERE CAN I PARK?
A new public parking lot just opened across the street from White Cloud Gallery at 14th
St NW and Swann St. NW). There is street parking on 14th Street and the surrounding  neighborhood blocks.  
INSURANCE
Artists are responsible for insurance that covers damage to their artwork.  We do  require a $300 deposit in cash for all exhibitions to cover any incidentals and clean/up.
This deposit will be returned at the end of the exhibition 
DO YOU CHARGE A COMMISSION?  Nope!            
HOW DO I RESERVE THE GALLERY?
Gallery reservations are on a first come first serve basis. A non-refundable deposit of  50% of the total cost is required to hold the space. The remaining 50% of the balance is  due seven days before the exhibition.
1843 14th street NW, Washington D.C. 20009
(202) 288 1391 whitecloudgallery@gmail.com
Artist Director Miguel Perez Lem 
Enclosure
343. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists
Date: 10 June 2016, 4:30 am
Deadline: July 11, 2016


National and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the entry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=3542" target="_blank">Oregon Art in Public Places Roster. The Oregon Arts Commission and the Regional Arts & Culture Council manage the percent for art programs for the State of Oregon, Multnomah County, and City of Portland. The Roster is a resource for public art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for their community and specific project needs.


Enter here.
Enclosure
344. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Another tree falls
Date: 4 June 2016, 2:01 am
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muera, sin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!
Enclosure
345. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: At American University's Katzen Museum
Date: 3 June 2016, 1:35 pm

Contemporary North Korean Art:
The Evolution of Socialist Realism

Curated by BG Muhn
The forms and structure of contemporary North Korean art, a central and highly developed dimension of the national culture, are largely unknown to the outside world. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the US, seeks to broaden understanding of North Korean art beyond stereotypes of propaganda and kitsch to show sophisticated and nuanced expressive achievements. It investigates previously unrevealed evidence of North Korean artistic experimentation and the evolution of Socialist Realism within this culturally homogeneous context. The works in the exhibition focus on the development of Chosonhwa, North Korea’s predominant painting medium that is revered as the nation’s most refined. The exhibition is curated by BG Muhn, artist and Professor at Georgetown University.
 
 
South Korean Art:
Examining Life Through Social Realities
Curated by GimChoe Eun-yeong
Examining Life Through Social Realities documents and examines life and the social realities of people living on the Korean peninsula through the Realist paintings of ten South Korean contemporary artists. As explained by exhibition curator GimChoe Eun-yeong, definitions of Realism have changed over time, but the Realism of South Korea closely approximates 19th century French Realist painter Gustave Courbet’s use of the term: to manifest artists’ perspectives of the world through expressive techniques and methods.

 
Art Cart:
Honoring the Legacy
Curated by Pamela Harris Lawton and Adjoa Burrowes
This exhibition ties together two cities - Washington, DC and New York City - in an inter-generational, inter-disciplinary project. Professional visual artists aged 62 and older are matched with students of art, healthcare, and aging to document and preserve their artistic legacy. The exhibition includes painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and installation by ART CART artists that highlight turning points in the artists’ lives including the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements.

ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY is a DC and New York based project that helps older professional artists and provides mentorships to students. ART CART: HONORING THE LEGACY features Alonzo Davis, Cheryl Edwards, Annette Fortt, Cianne Fragione, Pauline Jakobsberg, E.J. Montgomery, Annette Polan, and Terry Svat.
 
 
The Looking Glass:
Artists Immigrants of Washington
Alper Initiative for Washington Art
This exhibition celebrates ten artists who left Latin America for many different reasons over the last sixty years—primarily for safety, freedom, and opportunity—and made their homes, and their artistic careers and contributions, in the Washington region. They include Joan Belmar and Juan Downey from Chile, Carolina Mayorga from Colombia, Ric Garcia, F. Lennox Campello, and Jose Ygnacio Bermudez from Cuba, Muriel Hasbun from El Salvador, Frida Larios from Honduras