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1. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
2. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
3. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
5. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
7. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
9. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
10. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
13. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
14. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
15. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
16. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
17. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
18. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
19. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
20. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
21. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
22. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
24. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
26. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
28. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
29. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
32. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
33. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
34. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
35. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
36. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
37. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
38. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
39. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
40. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
41. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
43. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
45. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
47. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
48. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
51. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
52. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
53. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
54. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
55. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
56. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
57. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
58. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
59. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
60. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
62. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
64. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
66. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
67. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
70. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
71. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
72. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
73. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
74. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
75. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
76. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
77. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
78. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
79. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
81. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
83. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
85. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
86. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
89. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
90. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
91. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
92. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
93. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
94. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
95. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
96. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
97. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
98. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
100. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
102. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
104. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
105. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
108. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
109. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
110. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
111. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
112. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
113. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
114. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
115. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
116. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
117. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
119. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
121. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
123. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
124. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
127. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
128. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
129. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
130. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
131. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
132. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
133. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
134. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
135. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
136. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
138. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
140. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
142. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
143. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
146. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
147. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
148. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
149. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
150. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
151. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
152. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
153. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
154. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
155. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
157. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
159. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
161. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
162. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
165. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
166. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
167. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
168. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
169. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
170. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
171. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
172. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
173. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
174. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
176. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
178. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
180. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
181. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
184. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
185. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
186. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
187. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
188. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
189. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
190. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
191. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
192. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
193. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
195. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
197. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
199. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
200. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
203. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
204. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
205. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
206. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
207. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
208. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
209. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
210. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
211. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
212. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
214. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
216. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
218. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
219. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
222. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
223. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
224. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
225. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
226. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
227. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
228. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
229. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
230. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
231. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
233. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
235. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
237. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
238. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
241. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
242. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
243. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
244. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
245. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
246. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
247. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
248. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
249. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
250. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
252. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
254. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
256. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
257. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
260. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
261. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
262. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
263. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
264. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
265. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
266. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
Enclosure
267. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

Enclosure
268. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

Enclosure
269. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Enclosure
271. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
Enclosure
273. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
Enclosure
275. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
276. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
Enclosure
279. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
280. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
281. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

Enclosure
282. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
283. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
284. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
285. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
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286. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: Black Bodies and Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse
Date: 10 March 2016, 5:21 pm

By Elissa Favero

At the Seahawks-Vikings football game several weeks ago, players exhaled clouds of heat and moisture as they lined up for the snap. Their breaths swelled from their mouths, spread away, and then disappeared into the frigid Minnesota air. Welcome to Jupiter, sportscaster Al Michaels quipped.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, 2006-2008, digital chromogenic print mounted on Sintra. Image courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery.

A galaxy away, at the Henry Art Gallery,Bl artist Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse presents sixteen black-and-white photographs, oblique self-portraits of the African-American artist, in a tidy four-by-four grid. But much as you’d like to, you can’t read them as you would a scientific chart, a neat unfolding of instances over time. They are unlike the highlights of a come-from-behind athletic victory, or the successive shots of Eadweard Muybridge’s nimble horses accelerating to make the beginnings of cinema at the end of the nineteenth century, or even the daily photo documents of Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1972), which methodically show her figure, front, back, and sides, as it slowly diminishes in response to her weeks-long crash diet. And, their title notwithstanding, Oliver’s photographs certainly don’t read like the orderly progress of an astronomical eclipse, with one celestial body moving toward, overlapping, and then obscuring another.

Eadweard Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, 1878. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division.

Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972. Image courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

No, in Eclipse, we see partial views of the round shape of Oliver’s head and his tight black curls from above, but either camera or head moves from image to image so that our relative position, our relationship to his figure, is always shifting away from and back toward. Meanwhile, a bright white cone of air sprays and spreads out around the surface in each, illuminating his head, limning it with a vaporous halo, and obscuring it, partly, beneath an opaque density that will soon dissolve. An eclipse, we know, is an alignment of two bodies before a viewer, but it’s also a struggle for the power of visibility, a question of which body gets seen and which falls out of view, if only for a moment. A thing eclipsed is that which falls into obscurity or decline. But the kind of linear narrative seen in lunar and solar movement, or athletic competition, or equine dynamism, or gradual weight loss, does not appear in Oliver’s photographs. We read in them not a sequence but a perpetual struggle, a black head and black hair coming forward into the light only to be shrouded by it, like a ghost from a nineteenth-century spirit photograph.

The writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, like Oliver, insists on the black body over and over even as he fears for its dematerialization, even as he struggles against its becoming obscured in the myth-making of the American dream or, worse yet, brought down and pried open by the violence that is so often visited upon black bodies, especially black men, in our country. And in his recent book Between the World and Me, that ardent but tender letter to his teenage son, Coates won’t let the black body be lost either to the smoothness of politically correct language or academic erudition. “But all our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy,” he writes, “serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience, that it dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscles, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth. You must never look away from this. You must always remember that the sociology, the history, the economics, the graphs, the charts, the regressions all land, with great violence, upon the body.” (Between the World and Me, page 10)

In the mysterious photographs of Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse, there is not the clear violence of the stand-your-ground laws and police brutality Coates writes about, nor the repeated head trauma that many professional football players, mostly African American, sustain. There’s just a black crown that won’t disappear into the white light.

Demetrius Oliver’s Eclipse is on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle through April 10, 2016.

 

Elissa Favero is a recent recipient of the Art Writing Workshop Award from the International Art Critics Association/USA Section (AICA/USA) and the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. In this essay, Favero puts in Oliver’s Eclipse in conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coate’s writing from Between the World and Me. This essay is reprinted with the permission of the author. http://elissafavero.com

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287. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Henry Announces Jason Hirata as Winner of the 2015 Brink Award
Date: 12 June 2015, 5:54 pm

The Henry is delighted to announce Jason Hirata as the recipient of the 2015 Brink Award.

The award was established with the generous support of longtime Henry benefactors and Seattle philanthropists John and Shari Behnke, and provides financial support, increased exposure, and critical validation from an internationally recognized arts institution, with the aim of fostering the artistic and professional development of emerging artists in the region. Mr. Hirata will receive a prize of $12,500 and be given a solo exhibition at the Henry, accompanied by a publication next spring. In addition, a work of art will be acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“Jason Hirata’s work is multilayered and spans different media to explore questions related to the conditions of our contemporary, networked society and globalized economy,” says Nina Bozicnik, Juror and Henry Assistant Curator. “His practice is an ongoing questioning of what constitutes a work of art and the processes and forms it can take.”

Among Hirata’s concerns are the behavior of images and how they accumulate cultural meaning, technological innovation and effects on perception, and systems of valuation in art and culture. His art has taken form in flat screen monitors, the architectural details and volume of a gallery, and a meet up of audiophiles.

Jason Hirata was born and raised in Seattle. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Photography from the University of Washington and has shown locally at the Frye Art Museum, James Harris Gallery, 4Culture Gallery, and Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery. He works in Seattle and New York.

The 2015 cycle of the Brink Award relied on nominations made by invited members of the regional arts community.  Nominators were chosen with an eye to ensuring diversity in the selection process. This group of arts professionals and academics has a strong commitment to recognizing, promoting, and supporting emerging artists in our area.

This year, 57 nominations were received from a group of art professionals across the Pacific Northwest. The jurors conducted studio visits with all of the finalists in late May before selecting the award winner. The 2015-16 Jury was comprised of Dan Webb, artist; Robert Snowden, Curator at Yale Union in Portland; Helga Pakasaar, Curator at Presentation House Gallery in Vancouver, B.C.; Nina Bozicnik, Assistant Curator at the Henry; and founders John and Shari Behnke.

The Brink is in its fourth biennial cycle. In 2009, The Brink was awarded to Isabelle Pauwels, Vancouver, B.C.; in 2011, to Andrew Dadson, Vancouver, B.C., and in 2013, to Anne Fenton, Seattle, WA.

The Brink Award complements the Henry’s role as a catalyst for the exhibition and creation of contemporary art, while simultaneously demonstrating the museum’s commitment to artists working in our region.

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288. Source: Henry Art Gallery — Blog
Item: The Week Ahead @ Henry
Date: 6 May 2015, 6:20 pm

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
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290. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Nature Exhibit - online competition
Over $1,500 in cash awards. Deadline: August 29, 2016
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292. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale 2017 - South Korea
KRW116,000,000 (~101,500 USD) in awards. Deadline: October 31, 2016
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294. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: RED Biennial - Cambridge, MA
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: September 15, 2016
Enclosure
295. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Scottsdale Arts Festival - Scottsdale, AZ
$1000 Best of Show. Deadline: October 10, 2016
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298. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: 88th Grand National Exhibition - New York, NY
$20,000 in awards. Deadline: September 24, 2016
Enclosure
299. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Call for Artists: Shockoe Artspace
Date: 24 July 2016, 8:26 pm
Shockoe Artspace’s mission is to provide a vital platform for both student, emerging and professional artists from local and regional backgrounds as well as international. 
We are looking to promote a diverse array of works and exhibitions. Furthermore we exist to cultivate community through various forms and outlets that will deeply impact our city. We think it is vital to generate new and relevant dialogue surrounding the arts of all kinds that stimulates growth in the artist and increases interest and appreciation from patrons and supporters.
Through a diverse array of exhibitions, forums, and open critiques, we hope to extend the already flourishing artistic foundation and culture here in Shockoe Bottom and Richmond as a whole.

Submissions:
Artist submissions are welcomed. Submissions will be reviewed several times a year. If upon review, we have further interest, we will be in touch with you directly. Artists should include a C.V., and artist statement, along with a personal web address and or 5 to 10 jpeg images with captions. Submissions must be emailed to submissions@shockoeartspace.com.
Enclosure
300. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Opportunity for artists of LA area African ancestry
Date: 22 July 2016, 5:00 am
Deadline: August 15, 2016
Fee: $15

Through the Emerging Artists Program, MoAD (The Museum of the African Diaspora) is committed to providing local LA artists the opportunities to generate and exhibit work reflecting the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora... Bummer that it's just artists from the City of Angels...

The EAP is a call for artists to submit a solo exhibition proposal of their work. Competitive proposals will present innovative artwork to activate the salon space. 

This multipurpose space is the heart of the museum where they hold public programs, education workshops, and events. 

Four final artists will be selected. Each artist will have a 2 month solo show as part of the Emerging Artists Program to display their work in a solo exhibition.
We will hold two information sessions to review the application process and to answer any questions. These sessions will be held on June 1st and June 29th at 6pm in the MoAD salon and include a gallery tour.
Selected artists will be notified on August 31, 2016, after which artists will then work with the exhibitions team at the museum and have 2 months to finalize and prepare work.

http://www.moadsf.org/connect/emerging-artists-program/call-for-emerging-artists/

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301. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gallery B accepting applications
Date: 20 July 2016, 4:30 am
The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District and Bethesda Urban Partnership are accepting applications for Gallery B 2017 exhibitions!

This gallery, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E in downtown Bethesda, is available to interested artists and arts organizations for one-month rentals. All media including, but not limited to, painting, photography and sculpture is eligible to use the space. Gallery B does not take a commission on any artwork sold during the exhibition.  
 
We are seeking applications from local artists and arts organizations for month-long exhibitions in 2016. Gallery B has approximately 1,500 sq. feet of available exhibition space. The deadline for submission is July 29, 2016.

To be considered for a solo or group exhibition, and to review the gallery requirements, please
submittable.com/" target="_blank">complete this application.
 
Questions?  Please send them an email to artist@bethesda.org.
Enclosure
302. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: City Paper review and other thoughts...
Date: 14 July 2016, 8:24 pm
CP art critic John Anderson pops in with a nice review of the current show at American University's Katzen Museum... read it here.

And also just home from a packed, sold out lecture on the show at the Katzen... moderated by the amazing Jack Rasmussen and some excellent questions by AU Prof Adrienne Pine who wrote the very left-wingy but interesting essay for the exhibition's catalog.
There were also some interesting questions to my Colombian peeps Carolina Mayorga, whose performance at the openings, which you can also see on the video at the exhibition, raised a lot of interesting points.

Third use of the word "interesting" in the last two paragraphs.

Muriel Hasbun brought live heart beats from El Salvador, delivered dynamically across cyberspace and played in the background of the discussion... all part of her ever evolving mixed medias presentations.
I discussed what I call "Cuban privilege", which I define (since I invented the term), as the superior attitude that us Cubans have towards all other immigrants to the US.
Notice that I said "all", not just Latin American immigrants (legal or otherwise).
Cuban privilege: Immediate welcome, quick green card status, middle class entry (thanks to a well established and wealthy Cuban-American community infrastructure), educational/cultural inprints, solid familial and clannish unity, and a lack of "victimism" as an attitude.
Of course, that attitude is defined by a set of singularly unique characteristics that defined the Cuban mass migration the the US in the 1960s: a migration of the upper and middle classes, rather than the impoverished poor strata of most historical migrations to the US, a racial welcome of a mostly white immigrant wave, and the fact that most Cubans identify as Republicans certainly didn't hurt.
A far cry from the daily stresses and legal issues that most illegal immigrants face around our region, mostly very poor Central Americans looking North for a better life away from violence and poverty.
The audience gasped when I told them that my father didn't identify as a "Hispanic" or as a "Latino."
"I am a Cuban," he'd say proudly. And when he became a US citizen he changed that to "En mi corazon siempre sere Cubano, pero desde hoy, en mi alma soy Americano." 
Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation with a passionate, sometimes dangerous love that often clouds our perspectives and opinions. 

Nuff said!
Enclosure
303. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Gen-Y 3.0
Date: 11 July 2016, 4:00 am
VisArts presents a juried exhibition of artists ages 17 – 27 in the Kaplan Gallery from July 22 – August 28, 2016. The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a professional gallery. Though there are many labels aimed at describing the current generation of 17 to 27 year olds, such as Screenagers, Millennials, and Echo Boomers, VisArts is maintaining the Gen-Y name for its annual juried group exhibition of aspiring artists in this age group.


Drawing, photography, fiber, ceramics, painting, video, sculpture, and interactivity fill the Kaplan Gallery reflecting a variety of approaches to a wide range of content within the context of the digital age.


The 2016 Gen-Y 3.0 artists include: Sobia Ahmad, Katherine Akey, Susie Bae, Amy Berbert, Abbie Fundling, Jared Green, Ashley Ja’nae, Kern Lee, Emmanuel Mones, Richard Munaba, Angelique Nagovskaya, Raheel Raad, Yoon Sun Shin, Qin Tan, and Vivien Wise.

The annual Gen-Y exhibition offers young artists an opportunity to bring their artwork to the public and to experience the process of exhibiting in a gallery. The exhibition was developed to address this demographic of artists who are seriously making art and have little to no experience exhibiting their work in a professional gallery. Many are uncertain about how to proceed with a career in art or what it takes to be an artist. Many are under financial, social and educational pressures that might preclude further study in art. Others are committed to a non-art career track yet are passionate about making art. Most are working under the art world radar of the region. 

A dedicated team of gallery interns and volunteers plan and realize the annual juried exhibition with guidance from the VisArts gallery staff.  “From the call for entry to the preparation and installation of the artwork, the entire process is a learning experience- for the first time exhibitors as well as the organizers of the exhibition,” says Main. “Watching this exhibition take shape is inspiring. The interns embrace the vision to seek out the undiscovered young artists in our community. They are passionate about bringing their peers’ artwork into the public light.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held on Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 PM in the Kaplan Gallery. The reception and exhibition are free to the public.    

Gen-Y 3.0 
July 22 – August 28
Opening Reception: Friday, July 22, 7 – 9 PM
Enclosure
304. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications
Date: 9 July 2016, 2:24 pm
Don't miss your chance to apply! The deadline for 2017 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is rapidly approaching. The Individual Artist Awards are grants awarded to practicing Maryland artists through an anonymous, competitive application process to encourage and sustain their pursuit of artistic excellence.

Categories offered for the 2017 Awards are:

  • Classical Music: Composition
  • Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Dance: Choreography
  • Dance: Solo Performance
  • Poetry
  • Visual Arts: Sculpture
  • World Music: Composition
  • World Music: Solo Performance
All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can access the guidelines, application, and other application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab HERE on Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation's website.

The deadline for 2017 applications is 4:30 PM on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Questions about Fellowships? Please review the program guidelines and contact Kimberly Steinle-Super at
kimberly@midatlanticarts.org.
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