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1. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

Enclosure
2. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
triumph_will_poster.jpg
via uncp.edu


Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

Enclosure
3. Source: ArtCal Zine
Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

Enclosure
8. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
$3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
Enclosure
9. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
$10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
Enclosure
14. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
  • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
  • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
  • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
  • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
  • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
  • All art must be wall mountable
  • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
  • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
  • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
Enclosure
15. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
"Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
Free, Open to Public
Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
Enclosure
16. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: Art Howard County 2017
Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
 
Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
 
Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
Enclosure
17. Source: Daily Campello Art News
Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
Deadline: July 21, 2017


The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    18. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    19. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    20. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    21. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    26. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    27. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    32. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    33. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    34. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    35. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    36. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    37. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    38. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    39. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    44. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    45. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    50. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    51. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    52. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    53. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    54. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    55. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    56. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    57. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    62. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    63. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    68. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    69. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    70. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    71. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    72. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    73. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    74. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    75. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    80. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    81. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    86. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    87. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    88. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    89. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    90. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    91. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    92. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    93. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    98. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    99. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    104. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    105. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    106. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    107. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    108. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    109. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    110. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    111. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    116. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    117. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    122. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    123. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    124. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    125. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    126. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    127. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    128. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    129. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    134. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    135. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    140. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    141. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    142. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    143. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    144. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    145. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    146. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    147. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    152. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    153. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    158. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    159. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    160. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    161. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    162. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    163. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    164. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    165. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    170. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    171. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    176. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    177. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    178. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    179. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    180. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    181. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    182. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    183. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    188. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    189. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    194. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    195. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    196. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    197. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    198. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    199. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    200. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    201. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    206. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    207. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    212. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    213. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    214. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    215. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    216. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    217. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    218. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    219. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    224. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    225. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    230. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    231. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    232. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    233. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    234. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    235. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    236. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    237. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    242. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    243. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    248. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    249. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    250. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    251. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    252. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    253. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    254. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    255. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    260. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    261. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    266. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    267. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    268. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    269. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    270. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure
    271. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Burgers at the Laundromat
    Date: 31 July 2009, 3:50 pm
    ZelwiesBurger.jpg
    Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


    Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

    Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

    Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

    The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

    Enclosure
    272. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Triumph of the Will at Anthology
    Date: 10 July 2009, 1:39 am
    triumph_will_poster.jpg
    via uncp.edu


    Somewhere towards the beginning of Leni Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of the Will, in the middle of a long and tedious sequence of military men addressing the party congress on matters of public policy, Goebbels, in a suit, rises to the microphone to speak about propaganda. “May the bright flame of our enthusiasm never be extinguished,” he says, looking somewhat more comfortable in front of the crowd then you might imagine. “It alone gives the creative art of modern political propaganda its light and warmth. From the depths of the people it rose aloft. And into the depths of the people in must descend… It may be good to have power based on arms, but it is better and more joyful to win and to keep the hearts of the people.” It’s a telling moment, especially in light of Riefensthal’s insistence, for the remainder of her life, that Triumph was not and is not a propaganda film, but instead a work of ‘total art’ or of ‘cinema verite.’ Technically speaking, she is correct, insofar as Hitler had chosen her precisely for her pedigree as an artist, and she only agreed to make the film when he promised to keep Goebbels and his minions at the ministry entirely out of its production.

    And yet, watching the film today, it is clearly not only a piece of propaganda, but the apogee of the genre. By turns horrifying and deadly dull, it is wholly without irony or self-reflection of any sort. Quite literally a masterpiece, it is responsible for creating an entire arsenal of cinematic techniques later employed by everybody from Josef Stalin to Barack Obama. In effect then, the distinction, between art and propaganda, which mattered so much to Reifenstahl in the films production, has in some sense vanished. Art not only became propaganda but perfected it, the distance she fought to maintain damning her all the more for preserving the unique power of her vision. Triumph plays at Anthology this Saturday at 6 and 8:30, its worth seeing, if you haven’t before; even if the technical achievements no longer impress, the relentlessness of thing remains striking and, god willing, singular.

    Enclosure
    273. Source: ArtCal Zine
    Item: Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"
    Date: 1 July 2009, 6:49 pm
    NYC6 017.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


    Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

    Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

    Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

    In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

    AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

    KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
    and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

    NYC6 030.jpg
    Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

    AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

    KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
    through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

    Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

    AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

    KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

    Enclosure
    278. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: Art Quilt Elements 2018 - Wayne, PA
    $3,000+ in awards. Deadline: Oct 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    279. Source: Art Competitions provided by Artshow.com
    Item: NOAPS Holiday Small Works Show - Parkville, MO
    $10,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Sep 10, 2017
    Enclosure
    284. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Wanna go to an opening tomorrow?
    Date: 20 July 2017, 5:00 am
    1460 Wallmountables 2017 at DC Arts Center


    Opening Reception: Friday, July 21 from 7pm to 9pm


    DC Arts Center at Adams Morgan Day: September 10, 2017
    Installation: July 19th 3-8 pm, July 20th 3-8 pm, and July 21st 3-6 PM
    Deinstallation: September 16th – 17th 2-7 pm



    The DC Arts Center (DCAC) announces the return of 1460 Wallmountables, DCAC’s annual open exhibition. One of their most popular and inclusive exhibits is also one of their oldest traditions.


    Since 1989, 1460 Wallmountables has offered the opportunity for artists of all disciplines and abilities to show in this open hanging. They divide their wall space into 2 foot by 2 foot squares with strings, which creates a floor to ceiling grid on which artists hang their work. The work must fit into the space, and while artists can acquire more than one space, the work may not overlap the squares.


    The result is a most remarkable salon-style show that, despite its diversity, has a distinct rhythm. On the last day of hanging, the strings come down, they clean up the gallery, and have one of the busiest openings in town. On Wednesday, July 19th, DCAC will open its doors at 3 pm, beginning a three-day installation process during which artists can purchase up to five 2′ x 2′ spaces to hang their work.


    Spaces sell on a first-come, first-served basis for $15 per square, with DCAC members receiving one free space and brand new members receiving four spaces for their membership fee of $30. Work is accepted from a wide range of media created by artists at various stages in their careers. There is no curating; if it fits, it shows. To sweeten the deal, a $100 “Best Use of Space” prize is presented during the opening reception to the artist who makes the most innovative use of their 2’ x 2’ squares. Since the first Wallmountables in 1990, the exhibition has become a celebrated summer tradition at DCAC.


    One of the Center’s most important fundraising events, the open exhibition runs from July 21st – September 10th. DCAC is especially excited that Sunday, September 10, the final day of the exhibition, coincides with the annual Adams Morgan Day festival, giving our neighbors and all Adams Morgan day visitors one final chance to see the show.


    DCAC is a 28-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting budding artists in the Washington, DC area. Their 800 square foot gallery and 42 seat theater provides a professional venue for both visual and theatre artists. They also provide a structured program through which artists in all media can practice both the craft and the business of art. Today, DCAC is one of the only grassroots organizations available to artists looking to break into the mainstream. Just as artists have come to depend on their support, so too has the community come to associate DCAC with outstanding and original artistic expression.


    General Regulations for 1460 Wallmountables:
    • Each 2′ x 2′ space is $15 for non-members (maximum 5)
    • DCAC members receive 1 free space. Additional spaces are available for $10 (maximum 5)
    • Become a DCAC member at the event and receive 3 free spaces for a total of 4 (Regular membership starts at $30)
    • Each artist can purchase up to 5 spaces
    • Each piece must be 2′ x 2′ or smaller. Spaces may not be combined to accommodate larger pieces (if larger pieces can be divided, they can be placed in adjacent squares)
    • All art must be wall mountable
    • No painting or writing directly onto the wall
    • No adhesive materials can be used for hanging (i.e. 3M hooks, spray mount, adhesive Velcro, 2-sided tape or wallpaper glue)
    • Artists must bring their own materials for hanging their work (hammer, nails etc.)
    There are no reservations; artists show up with their work on the day(s) of hanging within the listed hours. Spaces are claimed on a first-come, first-served basis as artists enter DCAC’s doors and process their paperwork. There are no age limits or medium constraints so long as the art is wall mountable.


    DC Arts Center (DCAC), 2438 18th Street NW, Washington DC. For more information, visit dcartscenter.org.
    Enclosure
    285. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art of Engagement at Touchstone
    Date: 18 July 2017, 5:00 am
    "Art of Engagement" at Touchstone Gallery

    A conversation using the universal language of art about today's important issues and concerns.


    Juror: Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator, American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center.

    Opening Reception: August 4, 6 - 8:30 pm
    Free, Open to Public
    Cocktails Courtesy of Green Hat Gin
    Gourmet Frozen Desserts by Moorenko's Ice Cream
    Classical Violinist: Nakisa Karimian



    Participating artists: Bob Allen, Jenny E. Balisle, E. Balme, Willette Battle, Jennifer Becker, Rachael A. Bohlander, Madison Bolls, Mason Bondi, Silas Boyd, Chad Brady, Annie Broderick, Christine Cardellino, Sabine Carlson, Roberto Salgado De Carvalho, Megan Atwood Cherry, Bret Christopher, Cheryl Clayton, Irene Clouthier, K. M. Copham, Ali Corser, Chris Corson, Delna Dastur, Manal Deeb, Tenley DuBois, Anna Fine Foer, Michael Fischerkeller, Lindsay Garcia, Parisa Ghaderi, Ebrahim Soltani, Roberta Glick, Sonja Heldt Harris, Susan Hazard, Courtney Heather, Erlene Hendrix, Yumiko Hirokawa, Erin Hoffman, Lynn B. Hogan, Rik Holden, Michael Patrick Holt, Robert S. Hunter, Esther Iverem, Warren Alan Jackson, Jay Jacobs, Barbara Januszkiewicz, Amanda Johnson, Timothy Johnson, Sally Kauffman, Jeffrey Kent, Diane Kresh, Amani Lewis (CLR'D), Andrea Limauro, Sandra Malamed, Penny Mateer, Marla McLean, Judith Peck, James Penfield, Alessandra Ricci, Gabrielle Robinson, Jim Roldan, Stephanie Z. Ruyle / Spontaneous Threads, Beverly Ryan, M. R. Shebesta, Ann Stoddard, Grant Strudwick, Sally Schluter Tardella, Patricia Anderson Turner, Andre Veloux, Vidya Vijayasekharan, Jenny Wu, John J. Young.
    Enclosure
    286. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Art Howard County 2017
    Date: 16 July 2017, 2:29 pm
    The Howard County Arts Council is now accepting submissions for Art Howard County 2017. If you are a visual artist, 18 years of age or older, who lives, works or studies in Howard County, MD, you are eligible to apply to this biennial, juried exhibit.  The juror for Art Howard County 2017 is Thomas Engleman, Gallery Director and Professor of Visual Arts at Howard Community College. Details for entry are available in the Exhibit Opportunities section of the Arts Council website, for pick-up at the Howard County Center for the Arts, or by mail by calling 410-313-2787 or emailing info@hocoarts.org. The deadline for submissions is 11:59p.m. on Thursday, August 31, 2017.
     
    Art Howard County 2017 will be on display in Gallery I at the Howard County Center for the Arts from November 3 through December 15, 2017. A free public reception on November 10 from 6-8 p.m. will include juror remarks as well as the presentation of a minimum of $500 in juror awards. 
     
    Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10AM - 8PM, Saturday 10AM - 4PM, and Sunday 12 - 4PM.  To learn more about HCAC programs and exhibits, call 410-313-ARTS (2787) or visit www.hocoarts.org.
    Enclosure
    287. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award
    Date: 7 July 2017, 5:30 am
    Deadline: July 21, 2017


    The deadline for Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC) 2018 Individual Artist Award (IAA) applications is fast approaching. 

    These highly competitive awards recognize outstanding artistic achievement, honor the unique contributions of Maryland artists to the state's creative economy, and include grants of $1,000-$6,000 to support artists as they advance their craft. 

    MSAC is accepting 2018 IAA applications in the following categories: 


  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts
  • Visual Arts: Photography


  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF) administers MSAC's IAA program.

    Applicants can access IAA guidelines, application, and application assistance resources by clicking the "Maryland" tab here on MAAF's website. 

    The deadline for 2018 applications is
    Friday, July 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm EST
     
    All applications must be submitted online.

    MSAC and MAAF will offer one additional webinar before the deadline to guide IAA applicants through the application process. Advance registration is required. 

    Saturday, July 8, 2017, 10:00-11:30 AM - Register here
    Enclosure
    288. Source: Daily Campello Art News
    Item: Bootcamp for Artists Seminar
    Date: 5 July 2017, 5:00 am

    Early heads up!


    On September 30, from 2-4:30 pm, The Brentwood Arts Exchange and I will be once again hosting my well-known “Bootcamp for Artists” seminar at no cost to the artists.



    This seminar is suitable for all visual artists interested in taking their careers to the next level.



    Ever wondered how to maximize the attention your work gets from the press, galleries, and museum curators? How to present your work in a professional manner and save money in the process? How to tap into grants, awards and residencies? How to approach a gallery?



    Then this is the seminar for you! This program is free, but space is limited to 40 persons, and last year lots of artists were turned away because it filled up so quickly!


    As soon as they start taking reservations (and I will announce that soon), I recommend that interested people reserve early, as this seminar always books up very quickly!



    This program will be held in MNCPPC’s Brentwood Arts Exchange on the 1st Floor of the Gateway Arts Center, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue, Brentwood, MD 20722, just over the District line on Rhode Island Avenue.



    See ya there!
    Enclosure