ArsRSS Calls and Opportunities http://net18reaching.org/artrss/ Current Term Specific News Feed en-us Sun, 17 Jan 2021 03:00:01 -0600 240 <![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

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31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

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1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

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ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

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8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

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744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

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df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

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f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

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bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

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16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

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6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

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4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

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26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

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22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























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6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

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26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

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22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























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6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

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31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

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1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

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ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

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8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

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16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

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22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























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6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

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31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

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1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

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ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

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<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

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8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

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<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

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16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

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6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

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4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

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26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

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22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























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6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

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31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

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1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

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ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

]]>
16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

]]>
4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

]]>
26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

]]>
22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

]]>
24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























]]>
6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Galex 55 National Juried Competition and Exhibition - Galesburg, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ede1f1e1087c68048b29789f931f5774
<![CDATA[7th Annual Edna Curry/John Bower Exhibition - Bedford, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibit + $1,525 in awards. Deadline: Jan 24, 2021

]]>
ba88a2c61d240203a549374d12549b93
<![CDATA[CollexArt Grand Prize 2021 - Online]]> Found: deadline, award
$5,000 cash award, $1,000 purchase award. Deadline: Feb 28, 2021

]]>
8fafa503c82153682ade7dce1094070d
<![CDATA[7th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts - Piedmont, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 22, 2021

]]>
744302d4292ad037a53728f7f2c80a2a
<![CDATA[Watercolor USA 2021 - Springfield, MO]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$7,500 in awards + possible Museum Purchase Awards. Deadline: Feb 21, 2021

]]>
df685921cfcb3e14d9997f0fb89d3820
<![CDATA[36th Annual Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: Feb 18, 2021

]]>
7b8cbfa1ee10bd396c512beee1a9e9fb
<![CDATA[Disparity: A Look at Racial Disparities in America - photography and video contest]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in awards. Deadline: Feb 20, 2021

]]>
89334dfbe34132daf68b8819fe751c41
<![CDATA[Academy Center of the Arts Annual National Juried Art Exhibition - Lynchburg, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $3,000 in awards. Deadline: Feb 12, 2021

]]>
f248fd1f32c10f1f15d3cc6735445005
<![CDATA[The Future Generation - Washington, DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400 in awards. Deadline: Feb 9, 2021

]]>
5b1644e794d8e22f228180aa3074fcc8
<![CDATA[Visual Art Open Prize 2021 - Chester, England]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1250 pounds in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2021

]]>
bf9bfb146199ea92d1682806d6feabe2
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Artists]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline, submit, entry, entr

BlackRock Center for the Arts invites artists from the mid-Atlantic region to submit their work to be considered for two exhibition opportunities. The first is their biennial juried printmaking exhibit, INK IT: Contemporary Print Practices, with online entries due this Sunday, January 17.

ENTRY FEE:

$20 - Professional Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

$10 - Student Artists (up to 3 works per entry)

The second opportunity is their annual open call for exhibition proposals, for solo and group shows in all media. Online submissions due by Monday, February 1.

ELIGIBILITY: Resident of MD, DC, VA, PA, DE, or WV. Must be age 18 or older.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 2021 (online submission by 11:59 pm EST)

APPLICATION FEE: $35 (non-refundable)

Details here.

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16 January 2021, 2:32 pm 85657d003dc4cb1820acc66c3a30595f
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Six years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from that date:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 
My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule  atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 
And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired  the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his  nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we  recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna... 
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tuna 
Me he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think  to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

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6 January 2021, 4:00 am e61deab927a7130de345327ad945e52c
<![CDATA[Call For Entry: Hotel Indigo]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline

Quarterly Exhibitions at Hotel Indigo

Application Deadline: Rolling (submissions reviewed bi-annually)

Maryland Art Place (MAP), in partnership with Hotel Indigo is pleased to announce an open ‘Call to Artists’. 

As an extension of MAP’s annual IMPACT public art partnership projects, MAP is working with Hotel Indigo to offer rotating exhibitions in Hotel indigo’s library and Poets Modern Cocktails and Eats. This opportunity is available to visual artists living or working in Maryland. Maryland Art Place will curate four exhibitions a year based on submissions entered through a rolling basis. Hotel Indigo, Baltimore Downtown is a boutique hotel located in Baltimore, MD. MAP has been working closely with the hotel since it opened, selecting and installing the hotel’s permanent artwork collection including works by Jared Ragland, Gary Kachadourian and Christos Palios. 

Hotel Indigo and MAP share the same vision of supporting working artists in the region, and both look forward to their continued partnership and the rotation of quarterly exhibitions. 

For more information, visit www.baltimoreindigohotel.com

General Guidelines & Information: Details and application here.

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4 January 2021, 8:17 pm 95ef4bfe6187d5579f6ea98dab06f6c4
<![CDATA[Mortgage and Rent Relief]]> Found: submission, deadline

In accordance with the Arts and Humanities Capital Funding Emergency Amendment Act of 2020, the Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) has established the FY21 FAB: Mortgage & Rent Relief (FAB-R) grant program to assist DC-based arts and humanities organizations with rent or mortgage expenses. Funding is being offered in response to the financial impacts related to COVID-19 to help ensure arts and humanities organizations remain in place, vibrant, and viable to open when safe to do so. The complete Request for Applications (RFA) is available online.


Submission Deadline: Friday | January 29, 2021 | 11:59 pm

Prospective applicants should read through the Request for Applications (RFA) in its entirety before initiating an application.

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26 December 2020, 8:46 pm 8b7741c57c8e367c0ee413300b281093
<![CDATA[GASP at Artists in Middleburg]]> Found: awarded, award, juror

 

Earlier today I stopped at the Artists in Middleburg art gallery in Middleburg, Virginia (which is one of the nicest and cutest little towns less than an hour's drive from the DMV.

The Artists in Middleburg (AiM) is "a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Based out of a small art gallery in Middleburg, AiM hosts themed exhibitions each month for local artists as well as offers art classes, from Plein Air experiences to sculpting instruction."

On exhibition was GASP (GREAT ART SMALL PRICES), which features artwork under $500 and which runs through January 10, 2021.  This is a terrific show, loaded with exceptional art and clearly worth the short drive to Middleburg between now and Christmas if you're looking for that most super special of gifts: original art!

The show was juried - not sure who the juror was, but as readers of my writing know by now, I love to not only tell you who the prizewinners were, but also who I'd would have given the prizes to... this is always a healthy exercise (in my opinion anyway), as it is a great example of a Campellification of that well-established art saying: "art is eyes of the beholder... in this case "it depends who the juror is."

By now I have juried hundreds of art shows at all levels of the art cabal food scale, and I am always honored to be a juror, no matter for what of for whom.  I am also an opinionated juror, but that opinion always comes from a good place.

Best of Show was awarded by the juror of GASP to Greek Man, a stone, Smalti, 14k gold, and Swarovksi crystals mixed media piece (14.25 x 13 x .5 and selling for $475) by artist Charlene Sloan.

First place went to Winter's Day End, a lovely oil landscape painting by Laura Hopkins.

The second place award went to Hanging on the Vine, Mixed Media (20 x 25, $500) by Maribe Chandler-Gardiner, and third place to a spectacular sunset oil painting by Sharon Clinton titled (of course) Sunset (oil, 12x19 and $375).

Congratulations to all the prizewinners - well deserved!

Now... for my personal choices.  

First and foremost, I really, really liked all the paintings in the show by that same Sharon Clinton, including that prizewinning Sunset, and also After the Storm, a highly demanding and superbly executed small (8x10 inches) oil - I would have chosen either of those two as Best in Show.

That's Sunset to the right - showcasing the power of color when executed by a talented painter.

The paint application shows an exuberance of that certainty in applying and mixing paint that only comes after a thousand mistakes - each one a learning episode in the glorious path to dominance over the medium.

Another prizewinner for me would have been Jill Garity - her End of Summer (Oil, 16 x 12 for $485) was exceptionally well painted and clearly she has mastered also the palette knife . Garity writes that most of her paintings are "a combination of places that are both real and imagined.They are begun with rough shapes and a pattern of light and dark and are then developed with layers of opaque paint and glazes. Underlayers peeking through providing interest and visual texture. Use of the palette knife in places also provides a randomness that provokes creativity and often takes me on a path I had not planned."  Another winner would have been Contemplating Jackson Falls (Oil, 8 x 6 for $285).

Besides Clinton and Garity, an artist named Anne Reid also caught my eye.  Reid is what my art school professors would have described as a "painter's painter." Her brushwork is forceful and skilled, and it is the application of paint that makes her work stand out.  I quite liked Afternoon Drive (Mixed Media, 5 x 7 for $175) and The Farmer (Mixed Media, 9 x 12 for $450).

That's The Farmer to the right - note the way that Reid has decided to define the road just trod by the tractor.  Notice that colors, and shapes, and texture define the road, in an abstract way that once inside the entire composition becomes a highly realistic road! And yet, if you put a roughly square frame around that foreground road, you have quite an intelligent abstract work!

What else did I like?

I liked Margaret Cassidy's photos, Peggy Weed's Chicks (which was the rest of the Campello family's top pick!), Karen Merkin's Purple Onion, and a few others.

Some constructive criticism: I want several of the artists in this show - including some of my prizewinners - to read this article from over a decade ago: How to Sign Your Artwork.

This is a jewel of a small, intimate show in a memorable small town full of cool little shops and top of the line restaurants - the fried oysters at King Street Oyster Bar are really good, and the Thai food at Thaiverse Restaurant was among the best Thai food that our family has ever had.

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22 December 2020, 8:51 pm 9445be69c1743cb6968baaf549785392
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

 The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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21 December 2020, 6:00 pm 2e025fbd2831700d951484b30b8f33f4
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: submit, entry, entr

The Shining a Light International Photography Contest is organized by the Muhammad Ali Center. 

The topic of this year's contest is “Water”. 

The Muhammad Ali Center requests submitted photographs pertinent to the above described topic. Images should relate to women's work, lives, sanitation, and hygiene involving water. 

Photographs from this contest will be used to produce a documentary-style exhibition of 30-45 photographs, which will be exhibited at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky beginning Saturday, March 6, 2021.

For more details, please see the section "contest theme" here.

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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4 December 2020, 8:00 pm 0ed5d013f77375d7dbddea71d9836d5d
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Photographers]]> Found: awards, award, entry, entr

The Sony World Photography Awards are organized annually by World Photography Organization and sponsored by Sony. 

The Sony World Photography Awards features four competitions: 

1. Professional competition

2. Open competition

3. Youth competition

4. Student competition

No Entry Fee. 

Details here.

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24 November 2020, 9:56 am f52979c9bac2bdcf7849169b92338e18
<![CDATA[The Sonoma Ballet Conservatory Drawings]]> Found: juror

These are some of the drawings that I did as a fundraiser for the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory in early 1993 - there were almost a couple of hundred of them! I exhibited about 30 of them at the Chevrier's Presidio Gallery in Sonoma, and they all sold out on opening night!

I used some of these in 1994 or 1995 to apply for a studio at the Torpedo Factory.

I was rejected, and one of the reasons given for the rejection was that the drawings were "clearly copies of Degas' works." 

I was furious that someone's lack of art history knowledge had disqualified my application, but later I realized that whoever that erroneous and anonymous juror had also taught me an unintended lesson: there are some subjects in art (in this case ballerinas) that are so imprinted into the collective mind as coming from a particular artist (in this case Degas), that the subject has been signed off into eternity as not to be re-done by anyone else!

That was a harsh lesson to learn, but a very valuable one! 
























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6 November 2020, 10:00 pm 1105caafaa5230fef20e1c4698c38e1c