ArsRSS Calls and Opportunities http://net18reaching.org/artrss/ Current Term Specific News Feed en-us Wed, 18 Jan 2017 03:00:02 -0600 240 <![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






]]>
6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

]]>
6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



.
EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
.
PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
.
Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
.

Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

]]>
2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af
<![CDATA[Request for Proposals: Arts on the Riverwalk Mural - New Castle, PA]]> Found: deadline
$15,000 budget. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
e77a0f869c5929f64d5224186eb875e7
<![CDATA[Made in California Juried Exhibition - Brea, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: March 3, 2017

]]>
0cdad9ea4138157346c59cfbdb1392d5
<![CDATA[20th Annual Rio Brazos Art Exhibition and Sale - Granbury, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
b60896bb430e8a6cb0c8f0d4ddcb1395
<![CDATA[Call For Art: White-Black-Monochrome - Cohasset, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,200 in awards. Deadline: March 1, 2017

]]>
9a5173598f733934fae56483cdb73ec5
<![CDATA[Artists of Yardley Art Center 6th Annual Juried Art Show - Yardley, PA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 28, 2017

]]>
faf5f70ac947868ce3e249557aecc1c1
<![CDATA[Santa Barbara Printmakers 2017 Juried Spring Exhibition - Santa Barbara, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: February 12, 2017

]]>
1d20513959510910c264f7cfe94df737
<![CDATA[Fantastic Fibers 2017 - Paducah, KY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,750 in awards. Deadline: February 4, 2017

]]>
f1431b79a9c920be83e3f784b73cec98
<![CDATA[Stockley Gardens Arts Festival - Norfolk, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $7,000 in awards anticipated. Deadline: February 6, 2017

]]>
b00a6d7cb9e53862fc99e87317657892
<![CDATA[Sculpt Siouxland - Sioux City, IA]]> Found: deadline, award, jury
Participation Honorarium, $1,500; Jury's Choice Award, $1,500. Deadline: January 31, 2017

]]>
866b3add0a18ad7ef57e0b88c5d1e1b1
<![CDATA[32nd Texas and Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition - Irving, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$9,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2017

]]>
ceb0b1ee654717d73bac97373baabc10
<![CDATA[The Alper Initiative's Birthday!]]> Found: submit
The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is one year old!

The initiative promotes an understanding and appreciation of the art and artists of the Washington Metropolitan Area. They provide and staff a dedicated space located within the American University Museum, to present exhibitions, programs, and resources for the study and encouragement of our DMV creative community.

Longer Mission Statement

Alper At A Glance

  • 2,000 square foot space
  • 5 exhibitions of Washington art per year
  • 1 common gathering area and exhibition space
  • The ONLY museum space in DC dedicated to the display, research, and encouragement of the region's art and artistic community
Their presentation of the initiative mission and vision has generated supportive feedback from the community.

"I think there has always been a separation from the National Identity of Washington, DC and the Local Identity of DC. Partnering with the American University Museum helps to soften those boundaries and raise the level of critical attention towards local talent."
— Judy Byron, Local artist\

“The Alper Initiative is in the process of revolutionizing the way that Washington, DC sees its visual artists; this is a game-changer for our area's cultural tapestry.”
— F. Lennox Campello, local artist and art critic

Letter from the Director

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is the gift of Carolyn Small Alper, a Washington artist, AU alumna, and philanthropist. It provides the space and resources to fulfill one of the American University Museums’s primary objectives and meet one of the region’s greatest needs: to promote an understanding and appreciation of our region’s art and artists from our past, present, and future. It is an exhibition space and a place for study and research. But it is first of all a meeting place for people and ideas. Its most important contribution to the Washington region may well be the opportunities it provides for us to exchange perceptions and, perhaps, rewrite the history of Washington art.
The Initiative presents five exhibitions of regional artists each year, creates publications and programming to engage and build the audience for Washington art, and serves as a resource for its study and critical appreciation. Curators are solicited to propose appropriate exhibitions, and artists are invited to submit their work for consideration on our website.
The Initiative is a part of a thriving museum that for ten years has specialized in presenting Washington artists in the larger context of national and international contemporary art. Washington art is strong, intelligent, and relevant, and has earned a prominent place in contemporary cultural discourse. Thanks to the Alper Initiative for Washington Art, we have the means to present serious, focused exhibitions for all the world’s appreciation and enlightenment.
Jack Rasmussen
Director and Curator
American University Museum

]]>
12 January 2017, 4:21 pm e04a84c35fc3d1369f823fbe8029bd21
<![CDATA[Multiple Exposures Gallery looking for new members]]> Found: opportunity, submission, submit, jury
Multiple Exposures Gallery is looking for new members...


Multiple Exposures Gallery (MEG), a cooperative fine art photography gallery located in the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, currently has two membership openings — one permanent membership and one limited term membership through January 31, 2018 — for which they are issuing an open call.
Information sessions
Information sessions will be held at MEG on Saturday, January 7th, and Sunday, January 22nd, from 10am-12pm for photographers interested in learning more about the gallery and our selection process. Topics to be covered include: the benefits of MEG membership; roles and responsibilities of a MEG member; expectations for sales; displaying your work at MEG; the application and portfolio submission process and timeline; and “best practices” for submitting a portfolio for membership consideration.


The information sessions, which are optional, will be held at MEG in Studio 312 at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center, 105 North Union Street, Alexandria, VA  22314. You may RSVP for either information session by sending an email to MEG Vice President Eric McCollum.


Application process
To be considered for membership, photographers must complete a four-step process:
  • Notify Eric McCollum of your intention to apply no later than January 28, 2017.
  • Deliver a portfolio of work to MEG between February 4-7, 2017 between the hours of 11am-5pm.
  • Meet with a minimum of three and maximum of five MEG members before February 23, 2017.
  • Pick up portfolios at MEG between February 24-27 during the hours of 11am-5pm.
Key documents
Below are key documents to review and the application for membership that must be submitted with the portfolio of work:




Notification
Jurying for membership will take place on February 23, 2017. Any accepted applicants will be notified soon thereafter.


If you have any questions about this opportunity, please contact Eric McCollum.  






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6 January 2017, 4:30 am 3faaa017b0a613fc25648dea4c77453d
<![CDATA[On the second anniversary of a hero's death]]> Found: opportunity, entr
Two years ago my father died on this day... here's my eulogy from two years ago:
"Hoy se ha caido otro roble en la selva del amargo exilio" is how I always thought that my father's eulogy would begin once he died.

"Today another oak falls in the jungle of bitter exile," began the eulogy for the man whose bloodlines my children and I carry on.

Florencio Campello Alonso died today at age 90 in Miami, the heart of the bitter Cuban Diaspora. Like many Cubans of his generation, he was the son of European immigrants to Cuba. His Galician parents left the scraggy mountains of northern Spain's ancient Celtic kingdom and in the first decade of the 1900s migrated to the new nation of Cuba upon its liberation from Spain.

Galicians have always been uneasy subjects of the Spanish crown, stubbornly hanging on to their ancient Celtic traditions, to their own language and to their bagpipes, so it is no historical surprise that they left their mountain homelands en-masse and headed to the new tropical paradise of Cuba, free from the heavy hand of the Spanish monarchy.

And thus it was never a surprise to me that my father was both a fighter against heavy-handed rulers, a lover of freedom, and one who was never afraid to re-start a life for the better, even if it involved discarding the old. 

My father could have been one of the privileged few who currently rule atop the food chain of Cuba's Workers' Paradise. But instead of accepting the benefits of oppression, this most valiant of men chose the harsh path of right over wrong.

And he paid for it dearly (he spent years in Concentration Camps), but when he died, his soul was clean.

In his youth, my dad worked the brutal hours of the son of an immigrant who was slowly building a small financial empire in eastern Cuba. My father was pulled from school as soon as he learned to read and write, and like his two other brothers and eight sisters, he was expected to work and contribute to building a familial empire.

And he did, as my mother relates the stories of my father's childhood in the fields of eastern Cuba, a blond creole in a land of jingoist natives... he trying to out-Cuban the "real Cubans"... how he organized a labor union of the exploited Haitians who worked almost as slaves at the Los Canos Sugar Mill, how he joined a group of bearded rebels in the mountains of the Sierra Maestra in the fight against a tyrant, how he ran for the leadership of the Sugar Workers' Union and beat the Communists to the post, and how he spent years in a Castro Concentration Camp, jailed for the crime of refusing to join the Party, because he believed in Democracy and not Communism. 

And because of that stubbornness, in the 1960s he was offered the bitter pill of exile, and this brave man decided to choose family... and left his birth place, and thus became another immigrant within two familial generations and brought his wife and child to another new land.

And it is to him that I owe the greatest gift that a father can give a son: the opportunity to grow in freedom in the greatest nation in the history of this planet.

It is because of my father's courage that I was raised in this country and not in a land bloodied by brutality and oppression.

It is because of my father's teachings that I was raised with the conviction that freedom is not free and never to be taken for granted; after all, he fought for freedom and then Castro, the man who inspired the fight, ended up being a worse dictator, eventually destroying all notions of freedom for all of his people.

It is because of my father that I was taught that every citizen owes his nation some form of service, and that's the main reason that I signed (at age 17) to serve in the US Navy.

It is because of my father that I despise anyone who hides behind the mask of victimism to excuse failures and shortcomings.

When our family arrived in New York in the 1960s, my father began to work in a factory three days after he landed at the airport; my mother (who came from a privileged Cuban family and had never worked a day in her life) found a job as a seamstress five days later. That pattern was repeated for decades as they worked their way in a new nation.

"We thought we'd be back within a few years," was the answer given to me when I once asked the question about leaving their birthplace. When that didn't materialize, they became fierce Americans in the "United States of Americans" sense... these were the "America None Better!" set of immigrants, and in my Dad's case, you better be ready to fight if you dissed the USA.

"Americans"!

Always a fighter he was... and always for the right reasons.

Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.

And my Dad loved this nation even more than he once loved Cuba... perhaps it is the genetic disposition of the serial immigrant. After all, his father had left his own ancient Celtic lands and kin for a new land... which he learned to love dearly.

My father always wanted to make sure that I knew that I was an "Americano" and not another forced-on label.

"Labels," he'd say, "are just a way to separate people."

By labels he meant "Hispanic" or "Latino" or anything with a "-" between two ethnic words.

I also remember as a kid in New York, when he bought a huge Hi-Fi record player-color-TV console... that thing was huge. He bought it "lay-away" and he'd pay $10 a week to the store and him and I would walk all the way from our house on Sackman Street to the store on Pitkin Avenue to make the payments every Saturday - he never missed a single payment, and that taught me a lesson.

It was soon playing my Dad's favorite music, which oddly enough was Mexican music (Cuban music was a close second)... and he knew all the words to every charro song.
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...
Guadalajara en un llano, Mejico en una laguna...Me he de comer esa tunaMe he de comer esa tuna.... aunque me espine la mano.
That Jorge Negrete song... being shouted often on weekends at the top of his lungs from our apartment in a mostly Italian neighborhood in East New York in Brooklyn must have raised some eyebrows.

My dad and I watched Neil Armstrong land on the moon on that TV set... we also watched loads of Mets games... and in 1969 and 1972 went to Shea Stadium to see the Mets win in '69 and lose in '72. He really loved baseball and he really loved those Mets!

When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, so my Dad decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

He and my mother spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

When I visited him today in Miami, he looked good and freshly shaven... this is a good thing, as my father was a freak about hygiene... and that's a common "creole" trait.

The Hospice nurse almost teared up when I told her that my parents have been married for 60 years.

I looked at this old "gallego"... his skin as white as paper, his eyes as blue as the sky, and his head (once full of blond hair) as bald and shiny as the old Cuban sing song ("Mira la Luna, mira al Sol... mira la calva de ese.....") and I saw the generations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Gallego Homo Sapiens that led to my bloodlines... the generations of fighters, of strugglers, and of tough guys who didn't take no for an answer and who made a better place for others. 

And I felt at peace and grateful.

And as my father died tonight, after an extubation,  all that I can think to say to him is "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Dad... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children and it is no coincidence that you died on El Dia de Los Reyes.

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6 January 2017, 1:30 am 5ef7ca39bd064a0c0cf9b42cc80d2813
<![CDATA[Emulsion deadline next week!]]> Found: deadline, submit, entry, entr

DEADLINE: MONDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 11:59:59 P.M. EST


APPLY HERE

DOWNLOAD A PROSPECTUS HERE



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EMULSION 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

  • New, BIGGER Location—To accommodate the increase in the number of applicants for EMULSION, we have contracted the use of the 5,000 square foot PEPCO Edison Gallery. We hope to show a minimum of 40 artists.  This increases your chance to participate.
  • More Prize Money—We have increased the first prize purse from $1,500 to $2,000. We have also added two additional cashes prizes of $250 in the new honorable mention category.
  • Extended Viewing and Extended Programming—EMULSION 2017 opens on Fri., March 3 and runs through Thu., March 16. That’s two full weeks of viewing plus weeknight programming.
  • Television Coverage—WETA (DC PBS Affiliate) will be filming the drop-off, installation and opening reception.
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PRIZES

  • $2,000 First Place Prize
  • $1,000 Second Place Prize
  • $500 Third Place Prize
  • Two (2) $250 Honorable Mentions
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Entry Fee

An entry fee of $42.5 paid to East City Art via Submittable
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Location
Pepco Edison Gallery located at 702 8th Street NW in the heart of Downtown Washington DC

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2 January 2017, 3:37 pm ddb5088e56e209393a8d11426b29b6af