ArsRSS Calls and Opportunities http://net18reaching.org/artrss/ Current Term Specific News Feed en-us Sun, 20 Apr 2014 13:00:01 -0400 240 <![CDATA[Shame on Brandeis University]]> Found: call, entry
Below is a brilliant letter written to Brandeis president Fred Lawrence by historian and UM Professor Jeffrey Herf, who received his PhD from Brandeis, in regards to Lawrence’s decision to withdraw the offer of an honorary degree to Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the courageous Somali-born American who is perhaps the world's leading advocate for women's rights in the Islamic world - and shame on CAIR, for demanding this action and enlisting the drive to kick her to the side:
Dear President Lawrence:

As a scholar whose 1981 PhD comes from Brandeis, I read the news that you rescinded the offer of an honorary degree to Ayaan Hirsi Ali with particular disgust and anger. Your decision is an act of cowardice and appeasement to those 85 faculty members who signed their document of intolerance, and it has done deep and long-lasting damage to a university whose very existence is predicated on redressing the damage that discrimination within the academy had done to American Jews for so many years. Unless you can find some way to repair the damage you have done, I will not identify with or support Brandeis as long as you are its President.

Ms. Hirsi has had the courage to say unpopular things about the religion of Islam and the ideology of Islamism. In two of my prize-winning books, Nazi Propaganda for the Arab World (Yale University Press, 2009) and The Jewish Enemy: Nazi Propaganda during World War II and the Holocaust (Harvard University Press, 2006), I have had occasion to address the role of Islam and Islamism in fanning the flames of Jew-hatred. In publishing work that documents the role of the Islamist interpretation of the Koran in promulgating the most absurd and idiotic ideas about the Jews, I have faced intolerance from scholars working on the Middle East. They have denounced well-founded scholarship as “Islamophobia” or “Zionist propaganda” and denied that the Koran or Islamism could possibly have anything to do with anti-Semitism. 

Like Tony Kushner and Desmond Tutu, to whom Brandeis has given honorary degrees, they have erroneously argued that Arab and Islamist antagonism to Israel is exclusively the result of the alleged sins of Israel. As far as I know, neither has had anything of substance to say about the role of Islam and Islamism in fanning the flames of hatred of the Jews and of Israel. These critics have said that those of us who point to the anti-Jewish elements of the Koran and the Jew-hatred of modern Islamists are guilty of intolerance towards Muslims. I have seen this up close for years now. The last place I expected to find groveling, embarrassing appeasement of this rubbish was from the president of Brandeis University.

No doubt, Hirsi’s comments about Islam offend many believers. The same was true of Sigmund Freud’s Future of an Illusion. Freud, you will recall, dismissed religion as the product of a universal infantile neurosis of humanity. Yet I doubt that if Freud were alive today, those 85 faculty members would have protested his honorary degree. On the contrary, his criticism of religion in general, especially of Judaism or Christianity, would be seen as simply an entry ticket into intellectual respectability.

Your decision reflects a now-widespread double standard of broad criticism of Judaism and Christianity combined with fear—yes it is fear—to write and speak with equal critical spirit about Islam. We historians of modern Germany and Nazism know that the Nazi interpretation of Christianity as well as the core texts of the Christian tradition itself, were used by the Nazis to justify their mass murders. In our own time, Hamas, Hezbollah, the Muslim Brothers, Al Qaeda and the government of Iran, despite their differences, all draw on phrases from the Koran and in the texts of subsequent Islamic commentaries to find theological justification for antagonism to Jews, Zionism and the state of Israel.

Ayaan Hirsi Ali has been willing  to point this out, something Kushner and Tutu have never done. That the president of a university founded by Jews in the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust should have rescinded an honor to a woman who has had the courage to attack the most important source of Jew-hatred in the world today is a disgraceful act and a failure of leadership. Instead of appeasing intolerance in your faculty, you should have taken this moment to reaffirm the values for which Brandeis has stood for so long and reconfirm the place of universities as models of tolerance and enlightenment in our troubled society. Once a proud alumnus, I will be forced to disavow my relationship with Brandeis in the future.

Sincerely,
Jeffrey Herf
Professor, Department of History
University of Maryland
College Park

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15 April 2014, 4:31 pm deb4d79c9046917658c4ab00da1aad2b
<![CDATA[Free Ivan Fernandez Depestre]]> Found: call
The brutal and racist Cuban dictatorship has once again shown its true colors.

Cuban political prisoner Ivan Fernandez Depestre has been brutally beaten and placed in a small, inhumane punishment cell (known as a "tapeada") in the infamous Guamajal Prison of Santa Clara.

Fernandez Depestre, held without charges or trial since July 30th of last year, has been designated by Amnesty International as a "prisoner of conscience."  


He had simply protested against the brutal beating of two fellow black inmates by the Cuban prison authorities.

Once again, I call upon the Black Congressional Caucus to stop treating the racist dictatorship of the Castro Brothers with kid gloves and step up pressure on the Cuban regime to release this brave man and all other prisoners of conscience!

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13 April 2014, 1:05 pm a320fdf3d7977be099b3c0a016172cb8
<![CDATA[A Shared Universe: The Art of Comic Books]]> Found: calling, call, awards, award
Since I have now been curating exhibitions focused on comic book Superheroes for the last four years for the Aqua Art Fair in Miami Beach, Scope Art Fair in New York, Affordable Art Fair, also in NYC and last December at the Context Art Fair in Miami, I am looking forward to this exhibition.
All it takes is more than 130 works and some Wham! Bam! Kapow! For Strathmore to explore the world of comic books—interstellar, terrestrial, and beyond—in A Shared Universe: The Art of Comic Books, on view in the Mansion at Strathmore from Saturday, April 12 through Sunday, June 8, 2014. 

Ever since Superman kicked off the superhero comic genre in 1938, the medium has influenced fine and performing arts as well as pop culture. A Shared Universe charts the rise of comic book culture, the evolution of the art form and its influence on the visual art medium, and peers into the future. The show features a collection of original paintings, graphite and ink-based drawings, prints, comic book covers from the Library of Congress, web-based comics and works by undergraduate Sequential Art students who are shaping the genre in new and imaginative ways. 

A free Opening Reception will be held Thursday, April 24 from 7-9 p.m. For more information, call (301) 581-5100 or visit www.strathmore.org.

Artists Inspired by Comic Book Culture
The first floor of the Mansion illustrates how comic books have influenced other visual artists who incorporate compositional attributes, stylization or heroic themes into their works. JD Deardourff creates abstracted comic book images by silk screening. Compositionally and in their coloring his works resemble comic books, though the pieces themselves lack words or narrative structure, leaving the viewer to prescribe their own story. Mark Newport knits colorful, multi-patterned superhero “uniforms,” complete with names, bios and narratives for the masked crusaders who would wear his clothing. In addition to his outfits, the exhibition features a film of Newport in the process of creating a piece. Inspired by COSPLAY and identity roles, DMV favorite Andrew Wodzianski projects a superhero persona onto everyday people in his Fanboy series of large oil paintings—a man wearing a Ninja Turtles mask or emblazoned with the signature Cobra logo from G.I. Joe—hinting that everyone has a hidden persona of some type.

Comic Book Culture: Past, Present, Future
The second floor of the Mansion is dedicated to ever-expanding comic book culture. Viewers are primed for their experience in the Reading Room, with more than 300 comic books to thumb through that provide a survey of different artistic and narrative styles. The reading Room is furnished by local retailer Beyond Comics, which is opening a pop-up shop in the exhibition beginning Thursday, April 24. The exhibition next features artists Bob McLeod and Joe Rubenstein, both famous inkers and members of comic’s old vanguard, having worked with the industry’s most recognized and celebrated publishers. On loan from Geppi’s Entertainment Museum in Baltimore, five works by the late Warren Kremer provide examples of a different rounded brush style of illustration that defined the appearance of characters from Richie Rich to Casper the Friendly Ghost—originals of Kremer’s character “Stumbo the Giant” will be on view in A Shared Universe.

Meanwhile, Kate Beaton and Phil and Kaja Foglio represent the evolving Web-based comic universe. Prints from Beaton’s Hark! A Vagrant series and originals from the Foglio’s Girl Genius comic represent the changing, extended narrative that Web-based comics enjoy, as well as the trendy “steam punk” or “gaslamp fantasy” artistic style popular in this medium. Gene Luen Yang, author of the critically-acclaimed American Born Chinese graphic novel, represents this literary niche born from comic book art. Luen Yang’s was the first graphic novel to be nominated for a National Book Award and the first to win the American Library Association’s Printz Award. Graphic artist and New Illustration Chair of California College of the Arts Owen Smith bridges the divide between illustration and narration with his cover images for The New Yorker, as well as Sports IllustratedTime, and Rolling Stone. Anthony Fisher, Dean of the School of Communication Arts and Chair of the Sequential Arts Program at Savannah College of Art and Design, melds comic strip and comic book art with an ink and colored pencil work that is humorous and ironic.

Smith and Fisher, both artists, administrators and educators, segue into a portion of A Shared Universe dedicated to the enterprising and imaginative young minds that will forge the future of comic books. Works by 26 students from Sequential Art degree programs will forecast where comic books might be heading, with the proliferation of Web-based comics, online marketplaces for comics, and independent presses allowing infinitely more freedom for these young artists. Four educational institutions are represented: California College of the Arts, Savannah College of Art and Design, the Center for Cartoon Studies, and The Kubert School.

Education Programming
Strathmore will enhance the visitor experience of A Shared Universe: The Art of Comic Books with public education programs. Strathmore brings together a panel of experts for Beyond Text and Line: A Discussion on the Art of Comic Books on Sunday, April 27, 2014 at 2 p.m. Moderated by Greg McElhatton, former Executive Director of the Small Press Expo (SPX,) a founding freelancer for Wizard, and a current reviewer on iComics.com. The discussion includes Emily Gillis of Wayward Studios; JD Deardourff, a local comic-inspired artist; Rafer Roberts of Plastic Farm Press; and Monica Gallagher of EatYourLipstick.com. Admission is $5.

On Sunday, April 27, 2014 at 4 p.m., Strathmore presents Stripped, a feature film documentary illustrating the lives of the world’s best cartoonists. Admission to the screening is $10.

On Saturday, April 26, 2014 at 10:15 a.m., a Children’s Talk & Tour invites children to explore the exhibition and exercise their creativity through a hands-on arts activity led by professional comic illustrator Mark Mariano. At the 1 p.m. Art Talk & Tour, adults learn about the artwork in the exhibition from curator Harriet Lesser. Both events are free. Reservations are required for the Children’s Talk & Tour and can be made online or by calling (301) 581-5100.

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10 April 2014, 3:30 am 5b83ab0415b4067500968297f790a024
<![CDATA[Opportunity for artists]]> Found: call, deadline, entry
Deadline May 1, 2014

Nature’s ARTcade –  A Regional Art Exhibition at Flag Ponds Nature Park – on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay.  June 7 – June 29, 2014.  Indoor Gallery.  $2,000 in Prize Money. 

Curator:  Margaret Dowell, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, College of Southern MD.  

Prize Jurors:  Jayme McLellan, founder/director Washington DC’s Civilian Art Projects and Tom Horton, author and former environmental editor for the Baltimore Sun.  

Artwork may be any aesthetic, size and year of completion.  Artworks should in some way reflect inspiration from the natural world typical of the Southern Maryland Region.  

Entry  information at www.calvertparks.org/callforartists.  

Questions – call Anne Sundermann (Executive Director, Battle Creek Nature Education Society) at 301-204-4730.

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8 April 2014, 6:05 pm 6f09b829609d8e2b70d77d07f8007fb6
<![CDATA[Communications Director]]> Found: calls, call, residence
Activity Details
Call Type: 
Job
Start Date: 
09/17/2012
Time Commitment: 
3 days/wk
On-site: 
On Site
Call Details
get involved
09/04/2012 - 09/16/2012
Status: 
Current

Eyebeam Art + Technology Center is looking for a part time (3 days/week) Communications Director to start August 1. Eyebeam Art + Technology Center is the nation's leading center for art and technology, offering artists and creative technologists paid residences in its Chelsea facility, in addition to a wide range of public programs.  

We are looking for a creative self-starter who can work closely with our staff and artists to tell the Eyebeam story. The candidate should be able to engage with audiences through both traditional and social media. Great writing skills, a good design sense, an ability to think strategically, and a collaborative approach are essential.  

Other criteria include: 

Contact E-mail: 

read more

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13 June 2012, 5:20 pm 214843703e12e61d1f6be9700733cfa8
<![CDATA[Eyebeam 2012 Fall / Winter Residency Call]]> Found: calls, call, residency, deadline
Activity Details
Call Type: 
Residency
Start Date: 
09/17/2012
On-site: 
On Site
Call Details
get involved - residencies
05/24/2012 - 06/22/2012
Status: 
Current

FALL/WINTER 2012 RESIDENCY CALL

APPLICATION DEADLINE: All applications must have been received via online application by 12:00PM (noon) June 22, 2012. All applicants will be informed of their application status by August 13, 2012.

read more

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23 May 2012, 10:43 am b268b68f90324b4c9dd68ec706372f66
<![CDATA[Eye To Eyebeam]]> Found: opportunity

Eye To Eyebeam is a series on Eyebeam's residents and fellows. It includes interviews, photos, and other news and is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro. These interactive posts offer visitors the opportunity to learn more about Eyebeam's diverse community of creative practitioners.

Each week, you'll see interviews profiling individual Eyebeamers. Artists who have already engaged in conversation about their projects include:

Project Created: 
September 2011

read more

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11 October 2011, 12:43 pm a2a09a3ef20e97c75d80e1253a23818e
<![CDATA[International Call for Entry: Transportation - New York, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: May 18, 2014

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61592a6dba9e3daa5423b5e9b190e43d
<![CDATA[2014 Art Kudos International Juried Competition - Online Exhibition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in cash awards. Deadline: June 30, 2014

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681e90da1a9f5237780a25f632901810
<![CDATA[12th Annual Juried Art Show - Boise, Idaho]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: May 16, 2014

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06002be4691dd61e396d9d3a11835539
<![CDATA[Aqueous USA 2014 - Louisville, Kentucky]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Nearly $10,000 in cash, materials and purchase awards. Deadline: June 30, 2014

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59404e8259d1b798f254c5b5e6156445
<![CDATA[Can You See Me Now - Staten Island, New York]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in cash awards. Deadline: June 17, 2014

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73976995b5617d27cb737b15023ca553
<![CDATA[Private ProJECT Outdoor Digital Exhibition - Silver City, New Mexico]]> Found: deadline
$1,000 prize. Deadline: June 14, 2014

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e99899fcbd36143a12fdffe7c9b71f77
<![CDATA[9th Annual Wasatch Plein Air Paradise - Midway, Utah]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $8,500 in cash and purchase awards. Deadline: June 27, 2014

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5afdd7bfee1d1e83064ed998c48eeadc
<![CDATA[Nelson Gallery 15th Annual Juried Show - Lexington, Virginia]]> Found: deadline
Best in Show, $1000. Deadline: June 24, 2014

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9ffb02fda880a2cbed795ed9d5fa2653
<![CDATA[The 3rd Eros Awards - Online exhibition]]> Found: deadline
$2000 Grand Prize. Deadline: June 30, 2014

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e08901f518e9a88c9cc9e68078571c4c
<![CDATA[State of Being: RSI Bank's 3rd Annual Artists Contest - Rahway, New Jersey]]> Found: deadline
$4500 in prizes. Deadline: May 14, 2014

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bfc0cde4dbbd2f1e78b12336ad10afab
<![CDATA[text bites & textual vishyuns: a reeding & dialog with bill bissett]]> Found: award

Join us for a reading by renowned Canadian poet bill bissett, followed by a discussion of his work by publisher Karl Siegler and author Carl Peters.

Organized in conjunction with the exhibition textual vishyuns: image and text in the work of bill bissett at The Reach Art Gallery and Museum in Abbotsford, April 17-June 29.

bill bissett is a renowned Canadian performance poet, painter, and multi-media artist. His most recent book is hungree throat / a novel in meditaysyun (Talonbooks). textual vishyuns: image and text in the work of bill bissett (The Reach Gallery Museum, Abbotsford) is his first solo exhibition since 1984.

Carl Peters is the author of textual vishyuns: image and text in the work of bill bissett (Talonbooks) and the curator of the first major exhibition of bissett’s work since 1984 at The Reach Gallery Museum. His next book, Studies in Description: Reading Gertrude Stein’s Tender Buttons, is forthcoming from Talonbooks. His teaching explores the connections between film and avant-garde poetics, art, and artists.

The former publisher at Talonbooks, Karl Siegler is currently a freelance writer, translator, and cultural policy advocate/consultant. A charter student of SFU, where he earned a BA [Hons], MA, and a Distinguished Alumni Award for Arts and Cultural Achievement, he is currently an Associate of its Centre for the Humanities.

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10 April 2014, 2:00 pm be0d4623d13a24bc8bfcccf146387feb
<![CDATA[Joan Dark]]> Found: residency, awards, award

Taking its title from the lead character in Bertolt Brecht’s 1932 play Saint Joan of the Stockyards, Joan Dark evokes theatrical structures to navigate the slippage between objects and language. With an emphasis on the role of writing within the exhibition space, Joan Dark presents the works of six artists that plot the dialectic of the utilitarian and the lyrical. Joan Dark can be seen as both a title and a character; a reified individual whose agency and identity is both fixed and malleable.

 

Artist Biographies

Carole Itter is an artist, writer, performer, and filmmaker based in Vancouver. Solo exhibitions include Metallic: A Fish Film, grunt gallery, 2007; The Pink Room, grunt gallery, 2000; The Float, Or Gallery, 1995; and Rattles, Western Front, 1984. Her work was also included in WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution at the Vancouver Art Gallery in 2008. Itter’s work is included in the collections of the Canada Council Art Bank, the Vancouver Public Library, and the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Tiziana La Melia is a visual artist living and working in Vancouver. Her artistic practice spans the mediums of painting, sculpture, writing and performance. She received her MFA from the University of Guelph in 2011 and her BFA from the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design in 2008. Recent solo exhibitions include Neck of Thirsty Flower, Exercise Gallery, Vancouver, 2012; Table of Contents (Accompanying Poem), Clint Roenisch, Toronto, 2011; and The Hands of V&U, G Gallery, Toronto, 2011.

Li Liao is a visual artist currently based in Shenzhen, China. Liao’s art experiments with social systems and customs using his self as subject and object. Liao’s recent exhibitions include Art is Vacuum, Whitespace, Beijing, 2012; and Spring, Para Site Art Space, Hong Kong, 2012. Li Liao was a finalist in the 2013 Hugo Boss Asia Art Award for Emerging Chinese Artists.

Ariana Reines is a New York based poet. She has published several books of poetry including Coeur de Lion (Mal-O-Mar, 2007; FenceBooks, 2011) and The Cow (Fence Books, 2006), and her play Telephone produced by The Foundry Theatre in 2009 received two Obie Awards. She has presented performances at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, MoMA, The Swiss Institute, and Stuart Shave Modern Art.  Current projects include The Origin of the World,  a pamphlet commissioned by Semiotext(e) for the 2014 Whitney Biennial and Mortal Kombat, a kung-fu drama, for the Mouvement Biel/Bienne Festival in Switzerland, August 2014.

Bunny Rogers is an artist and poet who lives and works in New York, where she is currently in residency at the Queens Museum of Art. Recent activities include a solo show at Appendix Project Space in Portland, Oregon; an exhibition, with Benjamin Asam Kellogg, at Sandy Brown, Berlin; and a multimedia installation at 319 Scholes, Brooklyn, with Filip Olszewski. A book of her poetry, My Apologies Accepted, is forthcoming from Civil Coping Mechanisms.

Walter Scott is a Vancouver/Montréal based artist working in writing, illustration and sculpture. His ongoing comic book series, Wendy, follows the fictional narrative of a young woman living in an urban centre, whose dreams of contemporary art stardom are perpetually derailed. Recent exhibitions include Mood Valleys, Shudder Gallery, Vancouver, 2012; and Cracker Barrel, Macaulay and Co. Fine Art, Vancouver, 2013.

Exhibition Brochure and Catalogue Essay  (PDF Download)

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27 March 2014, 3:10 pm 14d9b6a77594be540a2df34e04c55ed3
<![CDATA[Shama Khanna]]> Found: residence

Shama Khanna is a London, UK based curator and writer. At Western Front Khanna will continue to develop Flatness, an ongoing research project engaging with the screen based image and immaterial culture in relation to the internet. Originating as a thematic program at the Oberhausen Short Film Festival, Flatness currently operates across multiple platforms including flatness.eu which features contributions by artists, writers and technologists engaging with the possibilities and limitations of the web as a creative site and a space for viewing. While in residence Khanna will convene a reading and discussion group around a weekly screening series. Please check front.bc.ca for forthcoming details.

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27 March 2014, 2:04 pm e65c99e26e3073c7e7012b1b286c02ca
<![CDATA[Living Improvisation: Workshop with Lee Pui Ming]]> Found: call, residence

$10 / FREE Western Front members

Advance registration required. 

To register contact: newmusicadmin@front.bc.ca

Musician-in-Residence with the Sound of Dragon Festival, pianist and composer Lee Pui Ming is recognized for her work in combining contemporary classical, jazz, and traditional Chinese music.

“We improvise all the time. We listen, assess, initiate and respond to what arises within and around us. In this gathering, we will explore more mindfully what we do automatically, and share our individual practices of improvisation. Bring yourself, and bring an instrument if you wish.”

Lee Pui Ming is an artist who is curious about the space where the Known meets the Unknown. Through the years, that exploration has led her to new ways of transforming and integrating Chinese material into her work; creating a live performance gestalt that includes sounding all parts of the piano, engaging her body and her voice; finding fresh ways of weaving tonalities; and diving into the wide expanse of open improvisation. And always, the intent is to communicate and connect with the listener, heart to heart.

In Pui Ming’s performing career, she has played in jazz, new music, and folk festivals in places like Montreal, Ottawa, Vancouver, Toronto, Halifax, Edmonton, White Horse, San Francisco, St. Paul (Minnesota), Honolulu, Berlin, Bern, Worpswede, and Hong Kong. She has been presented by presenters like Honens International Piano Festival in Calgary, Art Gallery of Ontario and The Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Vancouver New Music, and Hong Kong Urban Council. Recently she made concerto appearances performing she comes to shore with The Hopkins Symphony, Windsor Symphony, and The Bay-Atlantic Symphony.

Co-presented by Sound of Dragon: A Festival of Chinese Music.

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27 March 2014, 1:00 pm 6a48af1f2927e6e1f0db314d4c96736f
<![CDATA[Casey Wei]]> Found: residency

Vancouver-based artist/filmmaker Casey Wei will embark on a new body of work at Western Front during a research and production residency. Wei’s collagist practice traverses through the personal and historical narratives through the use of single channel video, appropriated moving imagery and text. Most recently Wei’s first feature length film, Vater und Sohn/Father and Son/ 父与子 takes the form of a video essay that is part travelogue, part documentary, tracing the complex history of the Father and Son comic strip from her own memories of growing up in Shanghai read against its origin in Nazi Germany and Maoist China.

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27 March 2014, 11:00 am 65ae12256bc46e3572e313824f821479
<![CDATA[Circuit Ensemble]]> Found: award

$12 General / $10 Advance / $7 WF Members & Students

The Circuit Ensemble is the musical face of a national grassroots collective of musicians and presenters dedicated to nurturing improvised music in Canada. An all-star lineup of movers, shakers, organizers and musicians convene in Vancouver to participate in a conference and concert performance.

Norman Adams (violin/cello), Coat Cooke (reeds), Chris Dadge (drums), Ellwood Epps (trumpet), Joel Leblanc (guitar), Liz Lima (clarinet/voice), Éric Normand (bass/electronics), Craig Pedersen (trumpet), and Nilan Perera (guitar/fx).

_____________

Artist Biographies

Norman Adams is Principal Cellist of Symphony Nova Scotia, the Artistic Director of suddenlyLISTEN music, and Music Director of Gwen Noah Dance and a musician eager to explore many different styles of music, sound creation and performance.  Norman has been a featured soloist with SNS, and Les Jeunes Virtuoses de Montréal and has performed chamber, and improvised music throughout Canada, the US and the UK. His performances have also been heard across Canada on CBC Radio One and Two. In addition to his work as a classical cellist, Norman is becoming increasingly well known across Canada, as an improviser and electronic musician, playing free and creative music. Norman has collaborated with many leading artists including Lori Freedman, Barry Guy, Eddie Prévost, Pauline Oliveros, Buck 65, Jerry Granelli, Marilyn Crispell and Lee Pui Ming.

Coat Cooke is acclaimed as one of Canada’s leading creative musicians.  Whether appearing with his acoustic trio or leading the legendary NOW Orchestra, his performances throughout Canada, the USA, Mexico and Europe generate inspiration for audiences and musicians everywhere. Coat has performed with many of today’s great improvisors: George Lewis, Marilyn Crispell, Barry Guy, Wadada Leo Smith, Amina Claudine Myers.  Cooke’s collaborations with spoken word, dance and mixed media are legion and his ensembles continue to engage top musicians from the West Coast’s capital of creative music, Vancouver.

Chris Dadge lives in Calgary, Alberta, where he works as a percussionist, producer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record label operator, and concert organizer. As an improvising musician, Dadge has spent the bulk of his years playing percussion, developing a voice based on an increasingly open-ended variety of sound-generating objects, integrating found items and re-purposed strings. This underlying quest for a personalized vocabulary led to the broadening of the instrumental palette, adding violin, broken electronics, crude sampling, and various other small instruments to the list. Dadge has worked with, among others, Peter Evans, Eugene Chadbourne, Jack Wright, Chris Riggs, Eric Chenaux, Mats Gustafsson, Christian Munthe, Ellwood Epps, Chad van Gaalen, Bill Horist, Fossils/David Payne, John Oswald, and Colin Fisher.

Ellwood Epps is an improvising trumpet player, and one of the leading lights of Canada’s creative music scene. He has performed with Steve Lacy, William Parker, Josh Zubot, Henry Grimes,Le Quan Ninh, Joe McPhee, Butch Morris, John Butcher, and Marshall Allen, and appears on more than 50 recordings. He has appeared internationally at the Stone, CBGB’s, The Jazz Gallery, the Guelph, Vancouver, Halifax, and Toronto Jazz Festivals, FIMAV, Festival of New Trumpet (NYC), Earshot (Seattle), Suoni Per Il Popolo, and the Off Festival de Jazz (Montreal).  Ellwood is active in Montreal as a concert presenter; in 2008 he co-founded the space L’envers, where he is artistic director, as well as co-founding and co-directing the weekly Mardi Spaghetti series. Collectively these two organizations present 150-200 concerts each year.

Joel Leblanc is a Fredericton-based guitarist. He toured America and Europe from 1997 – 2009 with the roots trio Hot Toddy. During that period, he performed at major international festivals in the blues, jazz and folk idioms respectively and opened for luminaries such as Bill Frisell and Dolly Parton. Composition and improvised music are his current pursuit. He’s played with a wide range of artists including: Tin Banger (trio), Geordie Haley, Tena Palmer, Mike Stevens, Raymond McLean, Juan Martin, Christine Duncan and The Element Choir, Ken Aldcroft, The Winter Coats, Nicole Rampersaud, Motion Ensemble, Chris Dadge, Suzie LeBlanc, JP Carter and others In 2013 Joel had two CD releases: Releases: “Ken Aldcroft and Joel LeBlanc- The Long and Short of It” and “Tin Banger – Music For Heathrow”

Liz Lima is a vocalist/clarinet player based out of Montréal, Quebec. Originally from Quebec, Lima plays as clarinetist and singer in the improvisational duo Framboos, collective Ample and Ensemble Ko, the Land of Kush and the Land of Kush’s Egyptian Light Orchestra. She is interested in traditional, contemporary music and improvised music.

Éric Normand is a composer, improviser, bassist, instrument designer, songwriter and singer and record and concert producer, all in one. He defines himself as an epidisciplinary musician, a free electron driven by its yearning for meetings. He has collaborated with such players as Philippe Lauzier, Pierre-Yves Martel, Jim Denley, Lori Freedman, Martin Tétreault, and Arthur Bull. His music has been programmed by or performed in several festivals in Canada (Festival de Musiques de Création — Jonquière, Reflux — Moncton, Productions SuperMusique — Montréal, Mois Multi — Québec, etc.), Australia (Nownow, Soundout) and Europe (Festival Rue du Nord — Switzerland, Festival des Musiques Insolentes — France, Les Rencontres à l’Échelle — France, etc). They have also been broadcasted by Radio-Canada, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, CBC, Radio-Grenouille, and several college radio stations.

Craig Pedersen is an award winning trumpet player, composer and educator living in Montréal Quebec.  Pedersen is also one of Ottawa’s busiest creative musicians.  Since moving to Ottawa from Victoria, BC, via Montreal three years ago, he has released three discs, with 2 more in the works, and has co- founded a twice-a-month improvised music concert series which has features the finest improvising musicians of Ottawa/Outaouais. A 2011 Canada Council Professional Musician grant winner, 2009 participant in Dave Douglas’ International Workshop in Jazz and Creative Music in Banff, AB, and 2009 participant at Ed Carroll’s Center for Advanced Musical Studies at Chosen Vale, Craig has quickly become an indispensable musician in the Ottawa music scene.

Nilan Perera is a sonic explorer and improviser whose work expands the language and techniques of experimental electric guitar performance, while attending to the legacy of 20th-century tradition established by such pioneers as Harry Partch and Fred Frith. Perera’s unusual approach to his instrument has earned him a reputation as one of Toronto’s most innovative experimentalists. He plays in a number of cutting-edge ensembles — including Handslang, The Excalceolators, Wiens-Perera Duo and NOMA — and has performed at the Vancouver International Jazz Festival, Toronto International Jazz Festival, for Sound Image Theatre, Autumn Leaf Performance, the Synaptic-Circus project, and with Peter Chin, Anne Marie Hood, and Susanna Hood.

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27 March 2014, 7:00 am 2c647beeb43f8191773ae6407e012aa1
<![CDATA[ArtScene for March 4 2014]]> Found: residence
Dr. Larry Lipkis, professor of music and composer-in-residence at Moravian College, talks about the world premiere of his new work, titled, "Ukioy-e," to be performed by SATORI at 3 p.m. March 9 at the UU Church of the Lehigh Valley, 424 Center St., Bethlehem. concertseries.uuclvpa.org or 610-866-7652 for more information.

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4 March 2014, 12:00 am 762cd7651fd13c0c592ca406c6a7243f
<![CDATA[The Truth podcast: Eat Cake]]> Found: calls, call
Can coconut cake + random phone calls = love? Find out in our alternative Valentine's Day radio drama from US producer Jonathan Mitchell
Francesca Panetta

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14 February 2011, 10:22 am 196e56db861cfa8df85f0beefe71e779
<![CDATA[The Heckle 02: Mistaken identities]]> Found: awards, award
In the Guardian's daily podcast from Edinburgh, Lucy Porter and Brian Logan mull over mistaken identities with Phill Jupitus and Andre Vincent and comedy bigwigs report on this year's if.comedy awards, plus Phil Nichol.

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7 August 2007, 6:35 am c98463d1678f7b9315b468b8d649985e
<![CDATA[Lynne Truss on The Mentalist spin-offs]]> Found: call
A thirsty carrot and a suspected wife-killer? It's time to call the Allotmentalist, says Lynne Truss






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20 April 2014, 7:15 am 8164918c2e6473067153efa322faf830
<![CDATA[Trainspotting, review: 'brave and glorious']]> Found: call
The film was much more than a call for rebellion






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19 April 2014, 5:00 pm 17d9f0f75cdedada526c9dd9f02609bb
<![CDATA[Almeida Theatre director Rupert Goold wants to make MH370 production]]> Found: awards, award
Rupert Goold, artistic director of London's Almeida Theatre, and big winner at this year's Olivier Awards, wants to bring the mystery of the missing plane to the stage






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19 April 2014, 12:00 pm 00956d720b163706824072629d2e792c
<![CDATA[DIGITAL LABOR: SWEATSHOPS, PICKET LINES, AND BARRICADES]]> Found: call
Call for Proposals
DIGITAL LABOR: SWEATSHOPS, PICKET LINES, AND BARRICADES

To be held at The New School, a university in New York City
NOVEMBER 14-16, 2014
#dl14

The third in The New School's Politics of Digital Culture Conference Series
Sponsored by The New School and The Institute for Distributed Creativity

DIGITAL LABOR: SWEATSHOPS, PICKET LINES, AND BARRICADES brings together
designers, labor organizers, theorists, social entrepreneurs, historians,
legal scholars,
independent researchers, cultural producers -- and perspectives from
workers themselves

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11 February 2014, 9:39 pm 8ca5b27f5be66b385768331b4e564d6f
<![CDATA[DIGITAL LABOR: SWEATSHOPS, PICKET LINES, AND BARRICADES]]> Found: call
Call for Proposals
DIGITAL LABOR: SWEATSHOPS, PICKET LINES, AND BARRICADES

To be held at The New School, a university in New York City
NOVEMBER 14-16, 2014
#dl14

The third in The New School's Politics of Digital Culture Conference Series
Sponsored by The New School and The Institute for Distributed Creativity

Digital Labor: The Internet as Invisible Sweatshop, Picket Line, and
Barricade brings together designers, labor organizers, theorists, social
entrepreneurs, historians, legal scholars, independent researchers,
cultural producers -- and perspectives from workers themselves -- to
discuss emerging forms of mutual aid and solidarity.

 Over the past decade, advancements in software development, digitization,
an increase in computer processing power, faster and cheaper bandwidth and
storage, and the introduction of a wide range of inexpensive,
wireless-enabled computing devices and mobile phones, set the global stage
for emerging forms of labor that help corporations to drive down labor
costs and ward off

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11 February 2014, 9:21 pm 34c9000287849c117d6d9f8bbf11a67a
<![CDATA[Re: Hyperemployed or Feminized Labor?]]> Found: opportunity
Hi John,

Perhaps there is a misunderstanding but I was referencing the 3rd paragraph in the  introductory email and broad brush introducing the contextualization....and was unduly influenced by Ian's specific backstory.

None the less, it is a on-going debate.  Please understand I believe it to be absolutely necessary - perhaps now more than ever!   We now have convincing (?)  quantitative evidence easily accessible to substantiate the formulation of this new phase of the debate. I, too, believe in  "the enormous opportunity (and need) that exists to invent and test new economic models that there is a lot more value to be gained (of all kinds) from spending our time building those possibilities...." however, we must resist the seduction of naiveté re: the context in which we are all operative and inter-dependent.

ATB,

Chris


On Nov 20, 2013, at 5:23 PM, John Sobol wrote:


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21 November 2013, 4:54 pm 278c24c072f1c6815fad87a8b054db80
<![CDATA[Re: Hyperemployed or Feminized Labor?]]> Found: call, opportunity
Hi Chris,

Hmm, I didn't recall that Ian's article was referring specifically to the video game industry but had the impression it was alluding to all forms of user-generated sharing. Maybe I got that wrong.

But yes I do imagine his article was at least in part driven by the reaction against the blind utopianism you refer to, a response I can definitely understand even at this remove from silicon valley where the resulting disparity is less visible.

And yes this discussion has been going on for a while, and I've disagreed with Trebor in the past around here about whether or not contributing 'user-generated content' to facebook and other social networks constitutes exploitation, in part for the reasons I mentioned in my post. Which is maybe why I thought the argument was about freely contributing to any online community and not the most obviously problematic cases of 'real work' being replaced by freely given labour.

I still believe that given the enormous opportunity (and need) that exists to invent and t

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21 November 2013, 1:23 am cec820d79ce5c47357f41cb02dbebabf
<![CDATA[Wie Gand Photography]]> Found: call
Wie Gand have some very creative photography work in their portfolio, these which I guess I'd call 'Urban Detail' photography were my faves:





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19 October 2012, 9:04 am 0118ecf6741925fc82acaeee9a8fd692
<![CDATA[Scene and herd: Tracking bison with photographer Edgardo Aragón]]> Found: call, residency
Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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The latest video project by Edgardo Aragón – a finalist in the 2013 AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize – tracks bison across North American, in Wood Buffalo National Park in the Northwest Territories, in Yellowstone National Park and near Chihuahua in Mexico, his home country. We talked to him about the project, made possible by his AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize residency.

AGO: Of the three places you visited for your project, which was the most surprising, in terms of defying your expectations? Why?
Edgardo Aragón: I was very surprised and still I am about Fort Smith. Given the conditions under which people live in this place, it could seem impossible that there’s life there, but life exists, along with one of the strangest lights that I will ever see in my life.

Since going to these places, has your plan for the project changed?
Whenever I plan a new project, I always expect that the circumstances change the nature of the project itself. In this case the change happened, without a doubt. Natural conditions modify the project a great deal, complementing and giving body to it in a way that a sketch could not. I’m satisfied.

Many animal species migrate – why did you choose to focus on bison?
I chose the bison for two reasons. The first is that it had a natural frontier that would shift according to the climate conditions, modifying substantially the life of the First Nations people who depended on the bison to survive. They would conform to the bison’s behaviour. That’s why the project is not, in fact, trying to create a portrait of bison so much as one of the invisible men that has ceased to live in harmony with it.

The second reason is that this animal species does’t migrate. After nearly becoming extinct at the hands of the white man, it has endured some sort of domestication. Today it is a species in the process of recuperation in Mexico and Canada. It is curious to note that in the U.S., where there are more reserves, the bison is not a protected species and is limited to its territories. This domestication is an aspect of extermination as well, of the animal and its animal nature and, of course, of what little spirit of the First Nations people remains.

Why did you decide to use video for this project instead of still images?
Video is a more organic tool, more malleable. You can move it in many directions to generate a specific discourse or an open one. I think I choose video because I like having elements that are closer to a sense of physical presence, closer to the movement of the apparatus, to the presence of a witness and specifically to the manipulation of time. Duration plays a fundamental role in establishing the dimensions of the theme. The sounds of the places or the absence of such sounds plays a fundamental role in the atmospheres that I’m trying to convey and generate in the project.

When you gave an interview to the Northern Journal, you said, “In a way, the real subject of the video project does not exist…It’s an invisible phantom.” Can you elaborate on that? What is the real subject?
The subject I am portraying is the human who lived with the presence of the bison. That way of life is poorly understood by Eurocentric cultures. That was what I was interested in discovering or portraying. I followed the path of the bison because it represents the way First Nations people lived. All the vacant spaces left around the bison are the spaces left by earlier lives – lives lived within the cultural shock generated by contact with Europe – and the near-extermination of the bison. The creation of reserves for the native people of the Americas were really the extermination of a spirit that generated a sense of life.

With the westernisation of North America a philosophy of life was destroyed – a loss which we have not been able to fully understand yet. This is why I like to think about this video as a portrait of an invisible human being, a portrait of a philosophy of life inherent to the creative and cultural spirit of a human being that disappeared many years ago. The presence of reserves for human and animal species is only one of its forms of annihilation. This is the central objective of the project.

All photos courtesy of the artist. Keep up with this year’s Aimia | AGO Photography Prize on Twitter and Facebook.

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9 April 2014, 12:37 pm cc3c5e91644a0c601b636fb980c42b20
<![CDATA[The 2014 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize: Meet the jury]]> Found: call, residency, submit, awards, award, jury

Voting won’t begin until late summer, but the 2014 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize is well underway. Over the past few months, individuals around the world have been researching and discussing exciting new ideas and directions in fine art photography and putting forward the names of artists whose recent work has shown extraordinary potential. The nominators — a group of 13 curators, critics and artists — submit two artists each for inclusion on the long list, and then a three-person jury selects a short list of four. Later this year, the shortlisted artists’ work will be exhibited at the AGO and online, and the public vote will decide who wins the $50,000 CAD prize.

We’re happy to introduce you to this year’s jury, led by the AGO’s associate curator of photography, Sophie Hackett, and we hope you’ll follow along as the Prize develops in 2014. Keep an eye out for long-list and short-list announcements in the coming months, and follow the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize on Facebook and Twitter for more news.

This year’s jury:

jurorSophie

Sophie Hackett is the Associate Curator, Photography, at the Art Gallery of Ontario and adjunct faculty in Ryerson University’s master’s program in Photographic Preservation and Collections Management. She has contributed to several Canadian art magazines, international journals and monographs, and she has curated or co-curated several exhibitions and public projects at the AGO, including Suzy Lake: Rhythm of a True Space (2008); Barbara Kruger: Untitled (It) (2010); “Where I was born…”: A Photograph, a Clue and the Discovery of Abel Boulineau (2011); Songs of the Future: Canadian Industrial Photographs, 1858 to Today (2011); Album: A Public Project (2012) and Light My Fire: Some Propositions about Portraits and Photography (2013-2014), a wide-ranging consideration of the photographic portrait, drawn from the AGO’s permanent collection. Upcoming projects include What It Means To be Seen: Photography and Queer Visibility and Fan the Flames: Queer Positions in Photography — both opening in June 2014. She is the lead juror for the 2014 AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize, a role she also held in 2010 and 2012.


Laurie Simmons

Laurie Simmons (b.1949, USA) stages photographs and films with paper dolls, finger puppets, ventriloquist dummies and costumed dancers as “living objects,” animating a dollhouse world suffused with nostalgia and colored by an adult’s memories, longings, and regrets. Simmons’ work blends psychological, political, and conceptual approaches to art-making, transforming photography’s propensity to objectify people, especially women, into a sustained critique of the medium. She has received many awards, including the Roy Lichtenstein Residency in the Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome (2005), and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1997) and the National Endowment for the Arts (1984). She has had major exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Baltimore Museum of Art; San Jose Museum of Art, California; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and she has participated in two Whitney Biennial exhibitions (1985, 1991) and was included in the 2013 Venice Biennial. Her work is represented in many noted collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others.


HDK-Enwezor-Photo-Jeff-Weiner

Okwui Enwezor is a Nigerian-born, German-based scholar, curator, and writer and has been director of Haus der Kunst since October 2011. He was adjunct curator at International Center of Photography, New York, and previously adjunct curator of Contemporary Art, at the Art Institute of Chicago. Enwezor has served as the artistic director of several leading biennials and international exhibitions and in December 2013 he was appointed as director of the Visual Arts Sector of the 56th Biennale di Venezia. Enwezor’s curatorial credits include exhibitions presented in museums and venues across the U.S., Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, including Guggenheim Museum, Tate Modern, Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art Barcelona, Museo Tamayo, Mexico City, Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels, PS1 / MoMA, New York and the National Gallery of Canada. Enwezor has received numerous awards and honors for his work including an honourary fellowship from the Royal College of Art, London (2010) and an award for Curatorial Excellence from Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture, Bard College (2009). He lives in Munich and New York.


This year’s nominators were:

  • Grant Arnold, Audain Curator of British Columbia Art, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver
  • Veronica Cordeiro, curator, Centro de Fotografía de Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Moyra Davey, artist and nominee for the 2010 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize (then called the Grange Prize)
  • Jon Davies, associate curator, Oakville Galleries
  • Gary Dufour, adjunct associate professor, University of Western Australia and former chief curator/deputy director, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth
  • Tamar Garb, Durning Lawrence Professor in the History of Art, University College, London, U.K.
  • Gauri Gill, artist and winner of the 2011 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize (then called the Grange Prize)
  • Marie-Josée Jean, head of the VOX Contemporary Image Centre, Montreal
  • Mami Kataoka, chief curator, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo
  • Beatrix Ruf, director/curator, Kunsthalle Zürich, Zurich
  • Jonathan Shaughnessy, associate curator, Contemporary Art, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa
  • Brian Sholis, associate curator of Photography at the Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati
  • Kim Simon, curator, Gallery TPW, Toronto

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31 March 2014, 10:00 am 53c387052a13298c7f421c0507e7d68e
<![CDATA[Time to party: MASSIVE 10 artist projects and entertainment]]> Found: call, awarded, awards, award
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On April 10, 2014, see artwork by Katie Bethune-Leamen, Bruno Billio, Jorden Blue Doody & David James Doody, Randy Grskovic, Sean Martindale, Hazel Meyer, Talwst and Artistic Director Justin Broadbent created exclusively for MASSIVE 10, the 10th anniversary of the AGO’s Massive Party fundraiser. In addition to these artists, we’re pleased to announce a musical lineup that will keep guests dancing all night long, including DJ Filthy Gorgeous, DJ Soundbwoy, Johnny Hockin and Joseph Of Mercury / Joseph & The Mercurials. Guests will also be treated to a birthday fête at the Aimia Photo Booth by Melanie Cantwell Designs where they will receive a memento of the evening. Guests will also be invited to interact with the Absolut Vodka installation by MAKELAB.

Massive Party tickets have sold out for the past four years running, so get your tickets now!

Artists and project details

Justin Broadbent
Justin Broadbent
Katie Bethune-Leamen
Katie Bethune-Leamen
Bruno Billio
Bruno Billio
Photo: Jade Rude
Jorden & David Doody
Jorden & David Doody
Randy Grskovic
Randy Grskovic
Sean_Martindale
Sean_Martindale
Photo: Cindy Blazevic.
Hazel Meyer
Hazel Meyer
Talwst
Talwst
Melanie Cantwell
Melanie Cantwell

Justin Broadbent
Justin Broadbent is back for his second year as Massive Party’s Artistic Director after the hugely successful Massive Party GOLD in 2013. He is an accomplished Toronto-based multi-disciplinary artist. His portfolio includes works in video performance, poems, funny ideas, illustration, design, shirt design, music video direction and installation. Justin is also a self-taught photographer. As a video director, Justin has worked with bands such as Shad, Metric, Serena Ryder and Classified. He has been nominated for five MuchMusic Video Awards, including Rock Video of the Year and Hip Hop Video of the Year. Justin’s other awards include a Juno for Record Package of the Year and a CBC Bucky Award for Music Video of the Year. Justin makes a point of choosing layered projects that challenge his expectations. His work often centres around meaning-of-life topics, which he delivers with a glimmer of charm and wit. Justin’s work is inspired by the impossibility of a seed becoming a tree, thrift stores, clever lyrics and human perseverance. He spends his spare time outdoors, looking at the world as if for the first time and adding to his collection of porcelain cat figurines that adorn the mantle of his Toronto home. Justin also likes rappers Creemore and David Shrigley.

Katie Bethune-Leamen
Katie Bethune-Leamen works in installation, sculpture, video and drawing. She received a BFA from Concordia University (Montreal) and a MFA from the University of Guelph. Katie has exhibited across Canada, in Iceland, Japan, France, Australia, the USA, the Netherlands, England, Australia and other countries. Recent solo exhibitions include Shiny Object Person (Young Gallery, Art Gallery of Ontario). Recent residencies include Fogo Island Arts (Fogo Island, NL) and SIM (Reykjavik, IS), with ones upcoming at the Illulissat Art Museum (Ilulissat, GD) and The American Museum of Natural History (NYC). In 2012 Rick Rhodes, editor of Canadian Art magazine, listed her as one of the “Top 3 of 2012.” Katie is the recipient of numerous grants and awards. Her writing has appeared in Canadian Art, C Magazine, Border Crossings and others.

At MASSIVE 10 Katie will be bringing 10 artists into the Gallery to participate in art creation throughout the evening. Guests won’t want to miss the chance to watch creativity live as artists interpret the same reference image in 10 different ways.

Bruno Billio
Bruno Billio is a Canadian artist working from an interdisciplinary background. At once an installation artist, a sculptor and a designer, Bruno creates challenging works informed by his command of each of these practices. He is currently living and working in Toronto, and has been the resident artist at the Gladstone Hotel on Queen West, in the fashionable art gallery district in Toronto, for the past few years. Bruno Billio’s artistic practice is informed by the active displacement and staging of the found object, a contemporary art strategy with a historically established lineage. The everyday is reinterpreted through its spatial and contextual re-appropriation by the artist, who presents himself by proxy as both an interventionist and an inventor. Bruno has exhibited internationally in Milan, London, Miami, New York and Los Angeles. Bruno was also Massive Party’s Artistic Director from 2010-12 – shaping the vision for Massive Party Speakeasy, Marchesa Luisa Casati’s Massive Party and #thefutureofartis.

Jorden Blue Doody & David James Doody
Jorden Blue & David James Doody are both graduates from the University of British Columbia in Critical and Creative Studies. Although each artist offers a uniquely individual approach to the discourse of visual arts, they share a common focus on the materialism of cultural codification. Their combined individual practices have been heavily influenced by world travel and the cross pollination of mass media, ritual and fetishistic cultures. Their practice moves freely between new media, sculpture, and painting.

“As a collaborative team for the past seven years, we believe that communication has been the foundation of our artistic relationship. A common thread that can be traced throughout our work is that of collage. By sampling freely from a multitude of different sources, we are able to access unlimited individual histories, societal contexts and cultural symbols. For us, collage is more than just cut and paste, it is an immediate sense of being; it is our way of participating in the re-contextualization of our unfolding culture.” Through their open processes of art-making they allow happenstance to regurgitate cultural intuition in an act of artistic survival.

Randy Grskovic
Randy Grskovic is an artist and curator living in Toronto, Ontario. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts, in Advanced Media communication, from the University of British Columbia, Okanagan. Randy has shown his artwork and curated others in exhibitions across Canada at galleries including Equinox and Centre A in Vancouver, V-Tape in Toronto, L’oeil de Poison in Quebec City and Eastern Edge in St. John’s, NL. Randy is the former owner of experimental short-term galleries including The Age of Info(rmation), Cutty Contemporary and Good Luck Art Gallery.

For MASSIVE 10, Randy will be honouring the AGO on a milestone event, congratulating all the Massive Party attendees who help make programming at the gallery possible, as well as cheering on the artists who helped create MASSIVE 10. His piece will provide encouragement to all involved while highlighting the spectacle inherent in the event. Don’t miss out on receiving the recognition you deserve as a Massive Party attendee.

Sean Martindale
Sean Martindale is an emerging and internationally recognized interdisciplinary artist and designer currently based in Toronto, Canada. His interventions activate public and semi-public spaces to encourage engagement, often focused on ecological and social issues. Sean’s playful works question and suggest alternate possibilities for existing spaces, infrastructures and materials found in the urban environment. Frequently, Sean uses salvaged goods and live plants in unexpected ways that prompt conversations and interaction.

Sean’s projects have been featured on countless prominent sites online, as well as in traditional media such as print, radio, broadcast television and film. His practice has a global following and has been written about in countries all around the world, and in multiple languages. Sean was profiled for the first episode of the CBC’s Great Minds of Design, one of his lectures was filmed by TVO for their Big Ideas series, and his work was also included in the feature-length documentary This Space Available, released in 2011.

Hazel Meyer
Hazel Meyer is a visual artist and sports enthusiast based in Toronto. She draws pictures, text and comics, makes letterpress prints, screen-printed multiples, broadcasts and constructs physical environments that are used for performance, collaboration, workshops and amateur athletics. From the monumental to the modest her projects range from immersive installations, to small woven tags meant for an audience of one. Much like the tag line of The Litter Game, a collaborative project she started with Lucy Pawlak and Jim Skuldt in 2013, her practice is devoted to a forever shifting ratio of endurance, transgression and laughs, as ways of being in one’s body and the world. She holds an MFA from OCAD University (Toronto), a BFA from Concordia University (Montréal) and shows her work in galleries, artist-run centers and festivals inter/nationally.

Keep an eye out throughout MASSIVE 10 for Hazel’s presentation of NADIA! NADIA! The piece centres around the 1976 Montréal Olympic Games and 14 year old Romanian gymnast Nadia Comăneci who received what was then the first ever 10 to be awarded at the Olympics. The scoreboard used at the time had not been engineered for the four numbers that make up an Olympic 10 (10.00), so it was displayed as 1.00. This moment of utter physical prowess and domination is made even more radical by the inability of the technology to be able to represent it. This discord is the starting point for NADIA! NADIA!.

TALWST
His practice is a study in extremes. As a musical performer, TALWST (né Curtis Santiago) is larger-than-life. As a visual artist, he has spent the better part of six years building miniature dioramas, entire worlds that fit in the palm of your hand. TALWST creates exquisite landscapes inhabited by vivid characters—hand-painted and reconstructed Preiser’s figurines—freezing memories and moments inside reclaimed ring boxes. From 2007 to 2010, he apprenticed under Aboriginal artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun. In the past six years, TALWST has had six solo exhibitions in Toronto, New York, Edmonton and Vancouver. As a recording artist, he’s collaborated with Grammy-winning producer Illangelo to release his fourth solo album, Alien Tentacle Sex, to international acclaim in 2012.

For MASSIVE 10, TALWST is scaling up and exploring interactivity and spectatorship in a one-night-only piece. Dynasty 10-0 plays off the Massive party theme, 10, and builds on previous artwork examining Canadiana, race and identity construction. For Dynasty 10-0, TALWST is incorporating new media, textiles and performance. Influenced more by Trinidad and Tobago’s Carnival than participatory art, TALWST seeks to create the same spirit of role-play, interaction and fete. Instead of traditional Carnival characters he has cast actors to portray hockey players and coach dressing for the fictional team the Massives. The participation of event attendees will play a pivotal part in how this happening unfolds.

Melanie Cantwell
Melanie Cantwell is an interior decorator, stylist and set designer. Originally from Prince Edward Island, Melanie now resides in downtown Toronto and has a number of art and interior design-based projects on her list of accomplishments, ranging from residential clients and styling for a variety of design-based photo shoots. Melanie is currently the set decorator on the Steven and Chris show on CBC where she oversees the set styling and manages the look and aesthetic of each individual segment. Melanie studied fine arts and graduated with accreditations in advertising and marketing from Sheridan College and interior decorating from George Brown College.

At MASSIVE 10, see Melanie’s set design at the Aimia photo booth. Guests will be able to have their photos taken while wishing the AGO’s Massive Party a “Happy 10th Birthday” surrounded by sweet confections, balloons and other special touches befitting of this milestone celebration.

Filthy Gorgeous
Filthy Gorgeous is the seductive alias of Toronto born DJ, Kristin Leeder. After bursting onto the scene in 2007, Filthy Gorgeous forged an identity with sensual, rhythmic styles that immediately set her apart from her peers. With sets that draw on cutting edge dance music Filthy Gorgeous has become known for a sound that is both rich and complex. She has performed with and received praise from the world’s top international superstar musician/DJs such as Skrillex, Drake, Disclosure, Annie Mac, Nero, Flight Facilities, The Twelves, Tensnake, Theophiles London, Fred Falk and Alvin Risk.

From playing at local Toronto hot spot, The Hoxton, to sold out shows at The Fillmore Miami Beach, New York’s Webster Hall, a regular at various SOHO House locations and special events during Winter Music Conference (WMC), Filthy Gorgeous always leaves the crowd wanting more. A favourite amongst the fashion crowd she has developed long-lasting relationships and played events for some of the world’s leading Fashion and Lifestyle brands. Filthy Gorgeous continues to win fans by building her reputation as an exciting international DJ talent. Constantly evolving and never afraid to take risks, she has made it clear that Filthy Gorgeous is one to watch out for.

Johnny Hockin
Johnny Hockin is a Canadian DJ, musician and multimedia producer. He is a local Toronto fixture, using his wide-ranging taste and an eclectic repertoire to link classic soul, disco, rock, hip hop and electronic music into a sound uniquely his own. He consistently plays for high-end corporate clients and some of the city’s favourite rooms (from Soho House to Thomson to the Drake Hotel to L’Oreal Fashion Week).

He is also known to many Canadians as the former face of movies on MTV Canada, interviewing hundreds of filmmakers and stars. Over the course of 5 years, Ryan Gosling brooded with him, Nic Cage looked at him funny, George Clooney charmed him, Jason Bateman made fun of his name and Justin Timberlake sang to him. Werner Herzog follows him on twitter.

DJ Soundbwoy
Wake up world. Wake up to the aural mindtrip that is the Soundbwoy experience. Born and raised in Toronto, Canada – the city that comes alive when everyone else is asleep – Soundbwoy is the embodiment of what is needed to lead the next generation of music connoisseurs into a new dimension of existence. Unbound by convention, Soundbwoy offers those in attendance the ability to transcend the dance floor and travel on paths only found in dream sequences. He is far from mash up yet incapable of being categorized by any one genre; a musical everyman blessed with the gift of virtuosity behind the turntables. From soulful gems found through countless hours of crate digging to the most ominous of house anthems from the sun swept beaches of Ibiza, a Soundbwoy party is like travelling with a master storyteller crafting his latest fairytale while touching the deepest parts of your imagination. Feel the party transform into your personal looking glass and let Soundbwoy guide you through his universe like no one else can.
Wake up world.

Joseph & The Mercurials / Joseph Of Mercury
Born to the dying synthesized bells of the 80s. Reincarnated from the velvet gentleman of the 50s. Stark Dark & Echo Heavy. Influenced more by the haunting sounds of nature & cinema than by music itself, Joseph spins cavernous worlds of light & ocean, longing & romance… all with nothing more than his voice & the mournful call of a swooning guitar. Seduced by the beauty of fashion & design, enraptured in its drama & detail, Joseph cloaks himself in the colours of their world, as they are enveloped by the echoes of his sound. Each song has found its rightful place among the works of Victoria’s Secret, RW&Co., Members Only, Stockholm S/S/A/W, Fashion Magazine, & V Spain. As if by desire & fate. Desire is everything.

For more information about MASSIVE 10, visit massiveparty.ca.

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21 March 2014, 3:07 pm c572ad285d4f84f7e090e03a985be71d
<![CDATA[Saying goodbye to The Great Upheaval (and thanks to our visitors)]]> Found: opportunity

More than 140,000 people visited The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910-1918 at the Art Gallery of Ontario between November 30, 2013, and March 2, 2014. The exhibition was a rare opportunity to see works by a large group of outstanding artists — including Chagall, Kandinsky, Matisse, Modigliani, Mondrian and Picasso — from the collection of the Guggenheim Museum, New York.

The exhibition’s attendance ranks it close to other recent popular exhibitions at the Gallery: Ai Weiwei: According to What? and David Bowie is both drew crowds of about 145,000 each.

Thanks to everyone who helped bring it together, inside and outside the Gallery, especially to our friends at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, lead sponsor BMO Financial Group, generous supporters Gail & Mark Appel and Joan & Jerry Lozinski and hotel partner Eaton Chelsea Toronto. And to all 142,360 of you who visited the exhibition: we hope you’ll be back. Keep sharing your thoughts with us on Facebeook and at @agotoronto on Twitter and Instagram.

The Guggenheim exhibit at the @agotoronto was the best exhibit I've seen at the AGO yet! Definetly worth a visit if your in #Toronto #Art

— Jessica Lim (@jessica_m_lim) February 17, 2014

Very cool to see @agotoronto's Great Upheaval exhibition jam-packed today. Stunning collection and such a great way to spend a Sunday.

— ashley bursey (@ashbursey) February 9, 2014

The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910-1918 was made possible by lead sponsor BMO Financial Group, generous supporters Gail & Mark Appel and Joan & Jerry Lozinski and hotel partner Eaton Chelsea Toronto.

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20 March 2014, 9:00 am 05ac2fd9bc7157ed88ee345d37ed6f73
<![CDATA[Conservation Notes: Kress Fellow Tessa Thomas and posters of the Belle Époque]]> Found: calls, call, opportunity, awards, award
Tessa Thomas and a Toulouse-Lautrec poster.

Tessa Thomas and a Toulouse-Lautrec poster.

The Samuel H. Kress Foundation provides yearly grants to cultural heritage institutions to support a conservation training fellowship; only nine awards for Kress Conservation Fellowships were presented for the 2013/2014 year and the AGO is pleased that the foundation selected us to receive a grant. Maria Sullivan, manager of Conservation at the AGO, calls the fellowship for emerging conservators — administered by the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation — “a unique opportunity for the AGO and for conservation training in Canada.”

“Having a Kress Fellow here in the AGO Paper Conservation Lab is such a wonderful way to engage with our fabulous collection, with dynamic discussion and sharing of conservation principles and techniques within a large collecting institution,” says Joan Weir, the AGO’s conservator, Works on Paper.

DSC_1198
Fabric lining on the verso of a poster, 'Le Photographe Sescau' by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.
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Top edge with visible threads from poster lining. 'Le Photographe Sescau' by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

As our Samuel H. Kress Fellow in Conservation, Tessa Thomas’s work is focused on the conservation of Ross R. Scott and Donald R. Muller’s recent remarkable donation to the Gallery: more than 75 posters, prints and drawings by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and artists in his circle. The poster revolution of the late 19th century transformed the city of Paris, created an obsession with colour lithography among leading artists and shaped the future of printmaking, poster design and advertising. More than a century later we are still captivated by images of the notorious celebrities of the Belle Époque and with the ambiance of the cabarets, cafés and dance halls.

To begin, Thomas completed a condition survey of the collection to identify the overall condition of works within the donation and to distinguish the unique characteristics of each work by visual examination. The initial survey gave insight into the broad spectrum of materials within the collection and provided interesting findings. For example, there are a few posters that have revenue stamps that denote which posters may have been displayed publicly when they were first printed in the late 19th century. Many of the posters show ink stamps, but one poster in the collection has a unique paper stamp, as seen below.

DSC_1029_supp

The range in size of the posters is also quite significant, with the largest posters measuring between 160 to 164 centimetres high by 115 to 122 centimetres wide. Any major conservation treatment of these works is sure to present unique challenges and require special considerations. As a result, the next step for the treatment of the collection will be to determine treatment priorities and develop a treatment methodology for the posters. Thomas’s research into the production of Belle Époque posters includes looking into the history and practice of the lining of posters, including past and present preservation techniques. Look out for more posts on her progress as the project continues.

About Tessa
Tessa Thomas is the current Samuel H. Kress Fellow in Conservation at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Tessa is a graduate of the Queen’s University Master of Art Conservation Program and was the recipient of the 2011 Emerging Conservator Award presented by the Canadian Association for Conservation of Cultural Property (CAC). Tessa specializes in the conservation of paper objects and brings with her experience in conservation and collections care from cultural heritage institutions in Canada and abroad, including The National Archives, London, England; the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Royal Ontario Museum and the Archives of Ontario.


Curious about Conservation?
If you have a burning question about Conservation, leave a comment below. We’ll do our best to give you an answer in an upcoming Conservation Notes post.


Signature Partner of the AGO’s Conservation Program


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19 March 2014, 10:28 am fe9756d6e55bab97a320837b75d11f8a
<![CDATA[Listen: Meet the Artist, with Paul Graham]]> Found: awarded, award
Paul Graham, Untitled (Smoking girl in orange light)Paul Graham,
Untitled (Smoking girl in orange light), 1996–98, from the series end of an age.
Chromogenic print, 179.5 x 133.7 cm.
Gift of Alison and Alan Schwartz, 2000. 2000/1348 © Paul Graham; courtesy Pace Gallery and Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York.

Click to play:

Download 57.1MB MP3

Recorded: Oct. 17, 2013, at Jackman Hall, Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 1:23:13

Paul Graham is a British photographer based in New York. Lauded as “a profound force for renewal of the deep photographic tradition of engagement with the world,” he was awarded the 2012 Hasselblad award for major achievements in photography.

In conjunction with the exhibition Light My Fire: Some Propositions about Portraits and Photography

Generously supported by Penny Rubinoff

Signature Partner, Photography Collection Program

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10 March 2014, 10:00 am 007d3c123c112569002a8298619a0984
<![CDATA[ART: Where to buy artist-made Christmas gifts in Brighton]]> Found: opportunity

Still struggling with the seasonal shopping? It doesn't all have to be trawling through Amazon or fighting the crowds at Churchill Square. Christmas is the perfect opportunity to support the arts and buy something truly special. Here are three of the best places in Brighton to buy creative Christmas gifts.

The post ART: Where to buy artist-made Christmas gifts in Brighton appeared first on Brighton Culture.

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10 December 2011, 10:32 am 3ace158fdd854ffc3bea34b33a717291
<![CDATA[Emerging artists wanting to participate in the Splendid festival read on...(May 2011)]]> Found: calling, call
Calling creatives of all stripes who have an inquisitive mind, an innovative approach and a desire to collaborate to participate in the 2011 Splendid program.

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20 March 2011, 2:03 pm a0ec52e369c8df0b4b378ef64b241d2e
<![CDATA[Lowry Art Trickery?]]> Found: calls, call
Wigan Today reports that an art lover from Cheshire accused of tricking a dealer into buying a fake LS Lowry has told a court he thought the painting was genuine. Maurice Taylor - who calls himself Lord Taylor Windsor after buying the title on the internet for £1,000 - sold the Mill Street scene to businessman David Smith during a meeting in a Ritz hotel room in 2007. Mr Smith, managing director of Neptune Fine Arts, paid over £230,000 before discovering the work was bogus. Taylor, 60, who lives in a mansion near Congleton, had bought the snowy scene featuring matchstick-style figures three years earlier through friend and Lowry expert Ivan Aird. Mr Aird acted as an agent for the previous owner Martin Heaps who, the crown say, sold the picture for £7,500 with an invoice describing it as "After Lowry" because it was created by artist Arthur Delaney. Prosecuting at Chester Crown Court, Sion Ap Mihangel, said Taylor knew the picture was fake, invented history to boost its provenance, and doctored the invoice so it appeared he was sold a genuine work. Taylor admitted telling his buyer and auctioneers Bonhams he bought the painting several decades earlier from industrialist Eddie Rosenfeld. He said he did not know why he lied but claimed Mr Aird asked him not to say he bought the painting through him. He said Mr Aird told him the painting was genuine and said: "When he sold me that picture there was never a question in his mind. I didn't question him, he told me it was original." A team of experts from Bonhams later assessed the work and were taken in by it. They provided a £600,000 insurance valuation and laid on the red carpet treatment, hoping Taylor would sell it through them. Mr Mihangel said Taylor acquired the Bonhams valuation to strengthen his selling position and to ensure a private sale. Taylor denies denies six counts of fraud and one of forging an invoice. The trial continues. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

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3 March 2009, 2:23 pm 742b0215e6c8dc96600e8ca9f935efd4
<![CDATA[Caged Art Recognised]]> Found: awarded, award
The New York Times reports that 1974 Tehching Hsieh, a young Taiwanese performance artist working as a seaman, walked down the gangplank of an oil tanker docked in the Delaware River and slipped into the United States. His destination: Manhattan, center of the art world. Once there, though, Mr. Hsieh found himself ensnared in the benumbing life of an illegal immigrant. With the downtown art scene vibrating around him, he eked out a living at Chinese restaurants and construction jobs, feeling alien, alienated and creatively barren until it came to him: He could turn his isolation into art. Inside an unfinished loft, he could build himself a beautiful cage, shave his head, stencil his name onto a uniform and lock himself away for a year. Thirty years later Mr. Hsieh’s “Cage Piece” is on display at the Museum of Modern Art as the inaugural installation in a series on performance art. But formal recognition of Mr. Hsieh (pronounced shay), who is now a 58-year-old American citizen with spiky salt-and-pepper hair, has been a long time coming. For decades he was almost an urban legend, his harrowing performances — the year he punched a time clock hourly, the year he lived on the streets, the year he spent tethered by a rope to a female artist — kept alive by talk. This winter, owing to renewed interest in performance art, new passion for contemporary Chinese art and the coinciding interests of several curators, Mr. Hsieh’s moment of recognition has arrived from many directions at once. The one-man show at MoMA runs through May 18. The Guggenheim is featuring his time-clock piece in “The Third Mind: American Artists Contemplate Asia, 1860-1989” through April 19. M.I.T. Press is about to release “Out of Now,” a large-format book devoted to his “lifeworks.” And United States Artists, an advocacy organization, has awarded Mr. Hsieh $50,000, his first grant. He is gratified by the exhibitions. But he judges the book, which is 384 pages and weighs almost six pounds, to be the definitive ode to his artistic career. “Because of this book I can die tomorrow,” said Mr.Hsieh. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

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1 March 2009, 5:44 am fd7169cf5c1136b48458b08bac45ae05
<![CDATA["Nazi" Picasso's Stay In NY]]> Found: jury
Time/CNN reports that it may have been possible for Picasso's boy to lead that horse without a rein, but it appears that the Museum of Modern Art didn't have the famous painting on as tight a leash as you might have thought. For more than a year that 1906 picture, one of the high points of MoMA's art collection, has been the focus of a Holocaust restitution fight that also involved another Picasso, Le Moulin de la Galette, this one hanging at the Guggenheim. Yesterday both museums settled out of court with three plaintiffs seeking return of the paintings, which they claim had been relinquished under duress by their Jewish owner in the 1930s. As with most settlements the details of this one are sealed, so we may never know whether or how much money changed hands. And by itself the mere fact that the two art museums chose to settle doesn't mean they didn't have faith in their own arguments. (Or, for that matter, that the plaintiffs didn't have faith in their's.) But jury trials are a crapshoot and for the museums at least, the paintings were too important to lose. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

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10 February 2009, 4:42 am bc8182e962bd4b6e9594ac931c5d7831
<![CDATA[Joe Boyle's Art at Waterfront Hall, Belfast]]> Found: call, opportunity
There is a small number of artists that savvy Irish Art collectors should carefully track in 2009 - and Joe Boyle (a previous Conor Prize Winner at the Royal Ulster Academy) - is one of them. This Belfast Waterfront exhibition fuses three themes. The first is Boyle's response to a trip to China investigating 17th century dry brush calligraphy combined with Chinese contemporary aspiration for a western iconography. The second is the notion that the fragment can intentionally signify the whole - as part of an ancient object may be considered a work of art - despite that not being the original artistic intention. In this exploration Boyle chooses the Eye as the part that signifies the whole in a meaningful manner - presenting an opportunity to explore different ways of seeing aspects of change in Irish Society. The final theme is a response to Landscape which employs notions of metaphor, edge and parameter to explore emotions which we experience and are challenged by what is often a familiar and sometimes threatening environment. Joe Boyle - Solo Gallery 2 Waterfront Hall 2 Lanyon Place, Belfast Tel: 028 9033 4400 Opens Tuesday 3rd February (7pm- 9pm) until 27th February 2009 Irish Art

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25 January 2009, 5:10 pm 4b446c25110586cb155c74a9f1c63bcf
<![CDATA[Irish Art Thieves Took Taxi]]> Found: residence
Bungling Irish art thieves led Gardai to their door last weekend when they brought their loot home in a taxicab. Two men were apprehended at a residence in Kilmore following the theft of three paintings. It is believed that the thieves were easily located after they hired a taxi to ferry them, and two of the paintings home following the robbery. According to Gardai a plate glass window in Greenacres was smashed and paintings removed from the display. Gardai this week said that while investigations into the matter are 'not yet complete', they are 'not looking for anyone else in connection with the matter'. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

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10 November 2008, 12:43 am 8b31fd7fd4d3a323e3af8af918d320de
<![CDATA[V&A CultureCast: July 2006 (no images)]]> Found: residence
The July 2006 edition of CultureCast features design historian David Crowley discussing the image of Che Guevara within the context of 1960s culture and politics. It also has an extract from a tapestry gallery talk given by Sue Lawty, V& A artist in residence and an article about the cast of the Portico de la Gloria in the Cast Courts.

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10 July 2006, 5:00 am 7f45194f7191090b5a3e8a16ef4292f4
<![CDATA[V&A CultureCast: July 2006 (enhanced with images)]]> Found: residence
The July 2006 edition of CultureCast features design historian David Crowley discussing the image of Che Guevara within the context of 1960s culture and politics. It also has an extract from a tapestry gallery talk given by Sue Lawty, V& A artist in residence and an article about the cast of the Portico de la Gloria in the Cast Courts.

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10 July 2006, 5:00 am fcc19779ff82a9ae2204dc9125804c34
<![CDATA[Norwich City v Liverpool live!]]> Found: calling, call, opportunity, jury

That second half must have been torture for Liverpool fans. The sight of this won't be:

90+5 mins: It's over! An impressive performance from Norwich, a brilliant result for Liverpool.

11 - Liverpool have won 11 games in succession within a single season for only the 2nd time in their top-flight history (+ May 1982). Surge.

90+4 mins: It's cleared, but there's no stroke-it-into-the-empty-net breakaway. Norwich pump the ball forward again, and that's cleared too!

90+4 mins: Sterling and Lucas combine to concede a free-kick, and Ruddy runs up for it!

90+3 mins: Double miss from Liverpool! Moses passes to Suárez, exploiting the inevitable gaps in Norwich's back-line now most of their defenders are actually attacking. He squares to Lucas, whose first effort is saved and whose follow-up flies wide.

90+1 mins: We're going to have four minutes of stoppage time, and they start with an optimistic long-range effort from Suárez that flies well wide, and continue with Sakho falling over straight into Snodgrass's legs, and bizarrely not conceding a free-kick.

90 mins: Johnson pumps a percentage ball down the line, and it's headed out for a throw-in. This is what Liverpool have come to.

88 mins: This has been an excellent, in-yer-face second-half display from Norwich, and Liverpool haven't liked it one bit. They have, though, started to fall over the inevitable whole-hearted challenges that come their way, and are winning free-kicks as a result.

87 mins: Liverpool have a free-kick on the half-way line, and are extremely grateful for it.

85 mins: Crikey, but this is tense.

83 mins: Redmond skips past Johnson and plays in Murphy, whose driven cross is cleared. From the throw-in Redmond swings in another cross, and Van Wolfswinkel surely offside, but not given heads low towards the corner, and Mignolet saves. Liverpool hearts in mouths. "Fers challenge on Suarez was a clear straight red card for me," roars Andrew Parry in Bangkok. "His studs were up and it was dangerous. How Suárez reacted to it is irrelevant." It was irrelevant, but funny.

81 mins: Whittaker lifts the ball into the box. Norwich are continually testing Mignolet's confidence now.

80 mins: Norwich have brought on Van Wolfswinkel for Hooper, and now Liverpool bring on Agger and take off Allen.

79 mins: Now Flanagan is booked for giving Snodgrass a very gentle nudge, which the Norwich player made a big deal of.

A long ball down the left is worked to Redmond, whose cross is headed by Snodgrass, and the ball loops in at the back stick. A slightly scruffy goal, and the contest is back on!

77 mins: Lucas finds Sterling in all sorts of space on the right, but for all that his cut-back is poor and the ball is cleared.

20 - Liverpool have now scored 3+ goals in 20 Premier League games this season, matching Man City's PL record set two seasons ago. Spree.

76 mins: The first substitution of the match sees Victor Moses replace Coutinho.

75 mins: Liverpool try to play their way out of defence again, and it leads to Lucas conceding a dangerous free-kick. Nothing comes of it.

72 mins: Howson is booked for a foul on Sterling. "I was sweating until Liverpool's third went in," notes, well, someone who doesn't sign their emails. "Actually I still am, in Bali and it's 30 degrees here."

71 mins: Norwich win another corner, headed just over by Martin.

@simon_burnton having seen the replay of Fer's tackle on Suarez, Suarez did well to race to his feet again. Studs all over his calf #tough

68 mins: The corner brings another great header from Johnson, but this one is deflected wide. The next corner is headed clear by Sakho.

67 mins: Coutinho plays the ball to Suárez, but the attempted first-time return ball is overhit. Down the other end, Snodgrass forces a save with a 23-yard low, bouncing shot.

65 mins: Skrtel gets booked, for shoving Redmond as the two chased the ball down Norwich's left flank.

63 mins: Suárez perhaps gets a little kick from Fer, and goes down rolling about and clutching his ankle. Then the ball rolls in his direction, and he springs up and hares off towards goal. It comes to nothing, except that is a fair amount of vicious criticism from the stands.

Sterling cuts out Johnson's pass in his own half, runs down the right, cuts inside and finally shoots from 15 yards. Johnson, having raced back to put in a last-ditch challenge, sees the ball deflect off him and loop over Ruddy and into the net.

60 mins: Mignolet will get criticised for the goal, but a) Johnson's challenge, and the commitment he showed in making it, was excellent; b) the ball deflected to Hooper off the back of Skrtel's head, which was a bit unfortunate; and c) he can hardly be blamed for the incoherence elsewhere in Liverpool's team after that wonderful opening.

59 mins: Chance for Liverpool! Johnson pulls the ball back to Suárez, lurking at the edge of the area, and he beats two defenders in checking back onto his right foot and then sends a shot six inches wide of goal.

56 mins: Liverpool attack, Suárez jinking into the area and shooting low but not very hard, and Ruddy saves with Sterling hovering menacingly.

56 mins: Liverpool are rocking now. Whittaker's low, diagonal cross from the right provokes a fair amount of panic, and a clearance.

1 - Liverpool have kept only one clean sheet in their last six Premier League games. Susceptible.

Norwich swing in the ball from the right. Mignolet comes out to fist clear but is outjumped by Johnson, and the ball rolls to Hooper, in front of an empty net.

53 mins: Skrtel engages in his routine matchly shirt-tugging, with Turner the victim. As usual, he gets away with it. I wonder how many penalties Liverpool might have conceded this season if Skrtel had his own referee. Incidentally, I forgot to say, in response to Gary Naylor, that in the last 25 years or so I think only Keegan's Newcastle at their peak have approached the attacking standards set by this Liverpool side, but they only ever did it for the wrong half of a season.

51 mins: A lovely cross from Fer on the right brings another Norwich corner. Johnson heads clear.

@Simon_Burnton Liverpool (2014 only) have been as exciting as any team in English football history, likely to be 9 points ahead of the rest.

49 mins: Suárez picks out Coutinho with a crossfield wonderpass. The ball is played back to Sterling, on the 18-yard line, but his left-foot, first-time shot floats high.

48 mins: Norwich again steal the ball from Liverpool as they attempt to play their way out of defence, and end up with a corner. Mignolet catches it.

46 mins: Liverpool get the second half under way, and immediately concede possession.

The players are back on the pitch. After the first half, Liverpool are now 7-1 on for the Premier League title with Ladbrokes (and others), who make Manchester City 5-1 second-favourites and Chelsea 28-1 outsiders.

If words and, possibly, moving pictures are simply not enough ways to follow this match, may I offer you some still pictures? Here's a gallery.

45+3 mins: Peeeeeep! A shrill blast of the referee's whistle brings an end to a half which was 66.6666666% engrossing and competitive, and 33.3333333% embarrassingly one-sided.

45+1 mins: We've launched into the first of two minutes of stoppage time.

45 mins: Another booking for Norwich, with Turner taking out a mid-flow Sterling just outside the centre circle. To be fair to Turner, though he was definitely attempting to tackle him, I'm not convinced he had any idea where Sterling was at the time.

44 mins: "Re Flanagan and Allen songs, as a Liverpool fan, I hope its going to be a case of Strollin and Roll on Tomorrow, and definitely NOT Yesterdays Dreams," notes Andrew Parry, as Liverpool again just about escape from their defence with a series of heart-in-mouth passes, zip down the other end and find Coutinho, who curls a shot just wide.

42 mins: Suárez tries to play in Allen, but the pass is a little too strong and the midfielder can do little more than win a corner. Which he does. Sakho heads it wide.

39 mins: Redmond has now switched to the right, giving Flanagan some stressful moments and leaving Olsson to swing in the crosses from the left.

37 mins: We've now had 25 minutes of fast-paced, entertaining and closely-contested football. If you can manage to put to one side the period that Liverpool massively dominated and in which they scored twice, this is a finely-balanced and intriguing match.

33 mins: Now Redmond has an excellent long-range shot saved by Mignolet, the ball pushed back into danger but falling to a defender.

32 mins: Now Norwich do steal the ball, from Sakho, as Liverpool mess about with it in dangerous positions. Moments later it took an excellent Skrtel interception to deny Hooper a tap-in. Come on Liverpool, you can't score from row Z you know.

29 mins: Snodgrass is booked for a nasty late lunge on Allen. It didn't quite deserve a red, but it was as close as you can get. A yellow and a half.

28 mins: Another free-kick from the left for Norwich comes to nothing. They're focusing their attacking down that side, clearly seeing Redmond v Johnson as a battle their man can win.

26 mins: Joe Allen, who is doing a passable impression of the complete midfielder in these early moments, sees a 25-yarder dip just wide of goal.

26 mins: Liverpool have barely mounted an attack since the second goal. Of course they don't really need to, but they really should give it a go they're quite good at it.

@Simon_Burnton Aggregate score in our 6 league games v Liverpool since coming back up now stands at 21-3. More to follow I'm sure.

23 mins: Liverpool play the ball out of defence, as Norwich hare about gamely trying to close them down. "And to think that Rodgers never did anything at Reading," notes Simon Pearce. A case of the right piece in the wrong jigsaw puzzle, I think. He was impressive at Watford, even if he didn't win many friends with the manner of his departure, and we all know about Swansea and Anfield.

21 mins: Don't get too excited, Norwich fans. Liverpool clear.

20 mins: Norwich are definitely having a spell here. They've now won another free-kick on the left. Redmond will take.

19 mins: Liverpool are good, but they're not perfect. Mignolet messes about with the ball at his feet and plays Sakho into trouble, and for a moment Norwich flood forward. Then Joe Allen pops up again, steals the ball and gets himself fouled.

17 mins: Chance for Norwich! A free-kick from the left is cleared to the other flank but re-centred. Turned heads down to Hooper, who checks inside, cleverly making space, only for Allen to arrive and get in his way twice!

16 mins: Norwich win a corner, and provoke a little bit of panic in the Liverpool defence if not, in the end, a chance. "If Liverpool win the title," notes Tony Cowards, "Brendan Rogers will become the first manager to win the Premier League title without first winning a national title with another club. Fergie - Aberdeen; Dalglish - Liverpool (pre-Prem); Wenger - Monaco; Mourinho - Porto; Ancelotti - AC Milan; Mancini - Inter"

12 mins: Norwich mount an attack, which ends with an over-driven cross from the left. Liverpool looked brilliant in the first half against Manchester City; against Norwich they look just incredible.

Luis Suárez: Has now scored 12 goals in his last 5 apps against Norwich, 7 of them at Carrow Road #LFC

Amazing! Flanagan's pass to Sterling, running down the left wing, is good, but Sterling's pass across goal is magnificent, and the finish is splendidly assured.

9 mins: Chance for Liverpool! Allen it is, making a run from deep and picked out with a pass by, I think, Coutinho, but his first touch, neat enough, carries him a little wide and Ruddy saves the shot.

9 mins: A half-chance for Norwich. Perhaps a quarter-chance. Hooper got his head to the ball deep in the penalty area, that's for certain. It flew out of play.

7 mins: With the ball bobbling around the Norwich penalty area, Sterling senses an opportunity to poke it with his toe and then fall over a defender's leg. He gets the ball, Fer provides him with the leg, but the referee is unimpressed.

6 mins: "We're going to win the league!" scream the Liverpool fans. Their side has scored a first-half goal in each of their last 25 games, we're told. Crikey.

Liverpool take the lead! From nowhere! The ball is shuffled from the left wing into the centre, where Sterling cuts onto his right foot and slams in a shot which takes the slightest deflection off Turner's butt-cheeks and flies in at the near post!

3 mins: A short delay while Olsson has treatment to a sore knee.

@Simon_Burnton Did quick tot, #LFC KO's later than Top 4 clubs (and #MUFC) most gameweeks this year. Knowing what's required = an advantage?

1 min: Norwich earn an immediate throw-in deep into Liverpool territory, but the league leaders play the ball out nicely, and Allen wins a free-kick on the halfway line.

1 min: Norwich do the honours in the centre circle, and the game has begun!

The players are out and busily shaking hands. This is about to happen. Deep breath everyone.

Brendcan Rodgers spoke earlier this week of Jordan Henderson's continued importance to his side, despite his three-match suspension:

Even though well lose him on the field we cant lose his personality off the field as well which is why hell still travel and be a part of what were doing. Jordan will still travel with the team. Ive told him hes a vital member of the group and he might not be able to effect the next three games on the field but hes going to be very important for our changing room, our travelling and our hotels because hes very much a part of us.

"Good to see Flanagan and Allen next to each other in the team sheet," notes Martin Treacy. "Looking through a list of their songs, and hoping we dont fall victim to the slips Chelsea and City have had, 'Dont walk in the shadows' seems rather appropriate. If all goes well this afternoon, 'well smile again' would fit!"

Brendan Rodgers has now also had a chat with Sky. Here are some highlights:

On everyone else slipping up: "There's always warning signs. It's a very difficult league to get results in. We're fully concentrating on the job today."

Neil Adams has been chatting to Sky. He's a pretty rapid talker, it must be said, so I didn't get every word, but here are the bits I did get:

On Norwich's relegation-haunted predicament: "We've got to win points. We've got to sort ourselves out. I don't think you can rely on other people. If you do, it's a dangerous game. We've got to make sure we're at it first and foremost."

Who buys these one-match-only scarves? Their existence, outside perhaps the occasional showpiece final, makes no sense to me whatsoever.

Daniel Sturridge is out with a hamstring injury and Jordan Henderson is suspended, so Joe Allen and Lucas Leiva come in for Liverpool. Norwich bring in Gary Hooper, with Ricky van Wolfswinkel on the bench and Sebastien Bassong cold-shouldered by Neil Adams.

Norwich: Ruddy, Whittaker, Martin, Turner, Olsson, Snodgrass, Howson, Johnson, Redmond, Fer, Hooper. Subs: Van Wolfswinkel, Bunn, Gutierrez, Garrido, Ryan Bennett, Tettey, Murphy.
Liverpool: Mignolet, Johnson, Skrtel, Sakho, Flanagan, Allen, Gerrard, Lucas, Sterling, Suarez, Coutinho. Subs: Brad Jones, Toure, Agger, Alberto, Aspas, Moses, Cissokho.
Referee: Andre Marriner

Morning. There are things that make sense, that look as they should be. Blossom on the apple tree in spring. A hawk tearing a rabbit to pieces and calling it lunch. Rain falling on London. These things might not always be a pleasure to watch, but they are somehow right. Other things, well, they just look weird. Unnatural. Stuff, for example, like this: Continue reading...

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20 April 2014, 8:56 am 83bf241e15935aeed176716695a3a8a6
<![CDATA[Sunderland 2-1 Chelsea: Gus Poyet on crucial win - video]]> Found: calls, call, awarded, award
Sunderland manager Gus Poyet says his side's win against Chelsea at Stamford Bride on Saturday was desperately needed in order to stay in the Premier League. The bottom-placed team ended José Mourinho's unbeaten home record and severely hampered their chances of winning the Premier League title. Poyet also calls the controversial penalty awarded to his team as 'difficult' Continue reading...

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20 April 2014, 8:28 am 09f5f92c40b9667e765b1ee90d1ee654
<![CDATA[Danny Welbeck considering his future at Manchester United]]> Found: opportunity
Striker unhappy under David Moyes
Potential target for Arsenal and Spurs

Danny Welbeck is considering his future at Manchester United after becoming dismayed at his lack of opportunity as a striker under David Moyes and unsure of his relationship with the manager.

Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur are two clubs interested in signing Welbeck whose pedigree as a Premier League winner and established international make him an attractive target in the close season. Continue reading...

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20 April 2014, 6:09 am d3defc63838b42a06baa263b2cb1644e
<![CDATA[Treasury must urgently explain plans to sell taxpayers' details, says Labour]]> Found: call
Shadow Treasury minister says plan could 'compromise the privacy of individuals simply complying with their tax obligations'

The Treasury must urgently explain its plans to allow HM Revenue and Customs to sell the personal data of millions of taxpayers to private companies, Labour has said.

The call comes after the Guardian revealed that ministers were planning to change the law to allow the sharing of anonymised data with third parties, where there is a public benefit. They are currently examining charging options. Continue reading...

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20 April 2014, 5:24 am 191fb99b78c76291dca4d0701b4c00ca
<![CDATA[LBC: from heartbreak to banter to political hot potatoes]]> Found: call, awards, award
Last month's live debate between Nick Clegg and Nigel Farage was a coup for LBC, the one-time London talk-radio station that has just gone national. It sees itself as an antidote to an elitist BBC, with its presenters free to be as opinionated as they like. Is this why so many of us are tuning in?

Nick Ferrari, the presenter of the LBC breakfast show, makes for a somewhat alarming prospect first thing in the morning, his hail-fellow-well-met manners and his pugilistic confidence coming at you like a triple espresso with too much sugar in it, whether you happen to be listening at home or in the station itself, as I am today. At home, however, you can only imagine what the king of the talk radio jungle must look like when he's in full flight. I'd pictured a red face and an air of deep must-do-my-best concentration, but observing him now from the other side of the glass that separates him from his producers, I'm struck by his studied macho nonchalance: hands behind his head, elbows flapping, belly out and proud. If he had a pint and a fag on the go, you'd hardly be surprised. It makes for an oddly old-fashioned sight given that, in radio circles, 53-year-old Ferrari is currently the man of the moment.

Ferrari is on a high, still coming down from the first of the debates between Nick Clegg and Nigel Farage, the leader of Ukip, which LBC staged on 26 March and he moderated. Opinions vary as to who exactly won this somewhat hammy altercation; it may be, the commentators insist, that Clegg is playing a long game and Farage's bloodying of his nose will work in the deputy prime minister's favour at some point in the future. But on one thing most are agreed: this was a win both for LBC, whose patriotic red, white and blue branding could be seen all over the 10 o'clock television news programmes, and for Ferrari, who acquitted himself brilliantly given that he has so much less television experience than David Dimbleby, the chair of the second debate. Today, moreover, Ferrari has been nominated for a whole clutch of Radio Academy (formerly Sony) awards. Call Nick Clegg, the half-hour phone-in he hosts with the deputy prime minister each Thursday, is on the shortlist for best speech programme and best news and current affairs programme, while he is on the shortlist in his own right for speech radio personality of the year and for presenting the breakfast show of the year. No wonder he's inclined to tell anyone who will listen that "apart from being a dad, this is the greatest bloody job in the world". Continue reading...

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19 April 2014, 8:08 pm 1c11b25a416dae95371ee5d3b07877e3
<![CDATA[Sophie Hannah: 'It's surprising how many poems turn out to be about sex']]> Found: award
The crime writer and poet on contrasting literary disciplines, the poetry of sex and the genius of Agatha Christie

Sophie Hannah's talents are unusual: she is a bestselling crime writer (author of nine novels) and prize-winning poet (her fifth collection, Pessimism for Beginners, was shortlisted for the TS Eliot award). Her poetry is studied by GCSE, A-level and university students. And all her writing is characterised by a zestful intelligence. Her new crime novel The Telling Error explores the psychology of an erring middle-class mother without diluting a bold plot about the stabbing of a newspaper columnist. It is a novel in which hi-tech and low behaviour collide. She has also just edited The Poetry of Sex for Penguin  the sort of idea that, in the wrong hands, could be a fiasco; with Hannah at the helm, it's a triumph.

How far apart are crime writing and poetry? Continue reading...

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19 April 2014, 7:05 pm 151cc8d53bc6a6f2ce37d3d2afca3972
<![CDATA[Jonathan Aitken calls for prison 'mentors' to tackle reoffending]]> Found: calls, call
Drawing on his own experience, former cabinet minister calls for new network of 15,000 mentors

Former cabinet minister Jonathan Aitken is drawing on his personal experience of befriending and helping a former prison inmate to quit crime and find a stable job, as he calls on ministers to establish a new national network of 15,000 mentors to slash reoffending rates.

In a report on mentoring for the Centre for Social Justice thinktank, Aitken tells for the first time how he helped Leroy Skeete, a fellow inmate in Belmarsh prison in 1999, where Skeete was serving an 11-year sentence for aggravated bodily harm, to end his cycle of reoffending and find full-time work a decade later. Continue reading...

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19 April 2014, 5:09 pm 7f0b19cec7f8dcd5ba3da623121504cd
<![CDATA[Scots, rise up against this great rock'n'roll swindle]]> Found: calling, call
All true fans should bemoan the lack of a radio station devoted to classic rock music

One of the advantages of living in Scotland's west central belt these last few years has now wretchedly, and without warning, been taken from us. Returning from abroad the other week, I discovered that, in the few days I had been away, the UK's only radio station dedicated to pure and unalloyed classic rock music had been replaced by something altogether more fey and watery, called X-FM.

By classic, I mean music where the musicians actually put their heart and soul into their work instead of deploying the plinkety-plonk guitar strumming that proliferates on all music stations these days and which too many people insist on calling rock. X-FM is an excrescence. Continue reading...

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19 April 2014, 2:04 pm feab2696543eb7fcbc293ab1d74d6b94
<![CDATA[Cardiff City's Peter Whittingham spot-on after Stoke's own penalty]]> Found: award

Cardiff had not gained or conceded a penalty all season, but Howard Webb put a stop to that, awarding one apiece on an afternoon that lifted the Welsh club above Fulham on goal difference but left them still precariously placed in the relegation places.

England's World Cup referee was centre stage, where he loves the limelight, disallowing what would have been a Cardiff winner as well as enabling first Stoke City's Marko Arnautovic and then Peter Whittingham to score from the spot. Continue reading...

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19 April 2014, 12:07 pm b39f401ed622d0e5a74a37526c113445
<![CDATA[This column will change your life: stop being busy]]> Found: call, deadline
'Most time management advice rests on the unspoken assumption that it's possible to win the game: to find a slot for everything that matters. But if the game's designed to be unwinnable, you can permit yourself to stop trying'

In her recent book Overwhelmed, about the modern epidemic of busyness, Brigid Schulte describes her testy encounters with John Robinson, an academic who insists we have oodles of leisure time, really, if only we'd let ourselves see it. Robinson says glib things such as, "A day without live music is like a day without sunshine" and Schulte, unsurprisingly, gets annoyed. After all, he's a divorced older male with grown children and a comfortable university post; Schulte is a mother of young kids with a deadline-driven job and a husband who doesn't do 50% of the chores. Yet by the book's end, it's hard not to conclude that Robinson has a point. For relatively well-off middle-class busy people, at any rate, the state of "overwhelm" isn't an objective fact about your life, like your height or bank balance or level of education. It's the result of a mismatch between what you expect of yourself and what you manage to get done. If you don't give a stuff about having a clean home, you won't feel overwhelmed by not having vacuumed in months.

The problem, of course, is that we set those expectations as a culture, not as individuals. You can't merrily decide one morning to opt out of everything that's demanded of you as a woman, man, parent or employee. Worse, the whole thing's rigged: the expectations keep getting bigger. Get on top of your email, and you'll find people send you more. Figure out how to spend sufficient time with your kids and at work, and you'll suddenly feel some new social pressure to spend more time exercising, cultivating a hobby or locating ethically sourced vegetables. Don't you just love consumer capitalism? This constant shifting of the goalposts isn't a flaw in the system. It's how the system works. Continue reading...

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19 April 2014, 4:00 am 2453a19d30ee9ad279faf70d614482e1
<![CDATA[Ayelet Waldman: Motherhood has become an Olympic sport]]> Found: calls, call
Maternal ambivalence has long been a central theme of Ayelet Waldman's work she thinks parenting is now ultra competitive

One day in spring 2005, Ayelet Waldman opened her inbox to discover 1,000 new messages. Must be a mistake, she thought. In fact, it was the start of a deluge that would include venomous online comment threads, angry notes left on her front gate, an appearance before a furious Oprah Winfrey Show audience, and calls for her children to be removed by social services.

The root of all this was an essay she had written for an anthology on motherhood, which she expected to be little-read. But it was picked up by the New York Times and, one Sunday, millions of people learned over breakfast that she loved her husband "more than I love my children". She often engaged in a pastime she called "God Forbid" she added, in which she imagined what would happen if she lost a family member. "I imagine myself consumed, destroyed by the pain. And yet, in these imaginings, there is always a future beyond the child's death ... But my imagination simply fails me when I try to picture a future beyond my husband's death. Of course, I would have to live. I have four children, a mortgage, work to do. But I can imagine no joy without my husband." Continue reading...

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19 April 2014, 2:45 am 878db2bc1ddc7337524ff1b725753203
<![CDATA[Weekend readers' best photographs: dive]]> Found: entry
From underwater to sky-high: your best pictures on this week's theme, dive

The next topic is low (to appear 3 May). Email a hi-res image (one per entry), plus a sentence or two about what inspired you to take your photo, to in.pictures@theguardian.com by noon on Wednesday 23 April; please supply a daytime telephone number. Conditions apply go to theguardian.com/theguardian/weekend/in-pictures-terms-and-conditions for full terms and conditions Continue reading...

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18 April 2014, 11:30 am c24f7b1f3392241452cebfe34d45fb86
<![CDATA[PFA Player of the Year award shortlist: Gerrard and Lallana nominated]]> Found: award
Hazard, Sturridge, Suárez and Touré also on shortlist
Barkley and Sterling among nominations for youth award

Steven Gerrard, Eden Hazard, Adam Lallana, Daniel Sturridge, Luis Suárez and Yaya Touré are the six players nominated for this year's Professional Footballers' Association's Players' Player of the Year award.

Continue reading...

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18 April 2014, 7:15 am 6ec8aac586e972e147eeab11a2cd1251
<![CDATA[Nami Yokoyama Exhibition]]> Found: awarded, award

poster for Nami Yokoyama Exhibition
Nami Yokoyama Exhibition
at Harmas Gallery (Kiyosumi, Ryogoku area)
(2014-03-15 - 2014-04-26)

The Nami Yokoyama was awarded the Toru Kuwakubo Prize at Petit Geisai #15 in 2011 and is featured as a young artist in the “Reaching for Realism” exhibition at the Toyota Municipal Museum of Art. Focusing on still lifes, Yokoyama does not conceal her respect for modern Japanese artists. The simple and everyday nature of the motifs in their works resonates deeply with her, and she too has turned her attention to the commonplace, choosing bean sprouts as a subject of her art. Although only a single sprout spreads across the canvases of many of her works, these paintings stir strong and lingering emotions, as if projecting the life experiences of the viewer. In addition to her beansprout paintings, which display her growing compositional skills, this exhibition presents works with new motifs. This assembly of old and new works demonstrates Yokoyama’s steady progress an artist taking an earnest look at daily life in Japan.

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f8ccce09c82f9afdd71696e39d6fb5e0
<![CDATA[POCORART Declares! 2014]]> Found: call

poster for POCORART Declares! 2014
POCORART Declares! 2014
at 3331 Arts Chiyoda (Chiyoda area)
(2014-04-05 - 2014-05-18)

54 artists who have featured in the 4 POCORART National Open Call Exhibitions to date, are especially selected for an exhibition which goes beyond the definitions of artist, people with disabilities and those without, going beyond age, background and experience, to return to a more central core of relations between people and art work. POCORART opens up a world beyond that of art brut and outsider art, revealing a pure form of art which transforms our perceptions of the everyday. [Related Events] POCORART Talk Show 1 Date: 4/5(Sun) 14:00-16:00 Speaker:Kenjiro Hosaka (Chief curator of The National Museum of Western Art) POCORART Talk Show 2 Date: 4/13(Sun) 14:00-16:00 Speakers: O Jun, Masato Kobayashi, Masato Nakamura For further details please refer to the official website.

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<![CDATA[“Hoki Museum Award Exhibition Vol. 1”]]> Found: award

poster for “Hoki Museum <U>Award</U> Exhibition Vol. 1”
“Hoki Museum Award Exhibition Vol. 1”
at Hoki Museum (Greater Tokyo area)
(2013-11-15 - 2014-05-18)

Showcasing 56 selected works from the first Hoki Museum Award competition, including the grand prize winner Makoto Yamamoto’s intimate depictions of women, along with Akiko Kawarada’s tracing through history and memory through the image of her grandmother, as well as the work of Makoto Ogiso exploring embodiments of life and death. [Image: Makoto Yamamoto “Memories of April 3rd”]

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<![CDATA[Tsubaki-kai 2014— Shoshin (Beginner’s Mind)]]> Found: opportunity

poster for Tsubaki-kai 2014— Shoshin (Beginner’s Mind)
Tsubaki-kai 2014— Shoshin (Beginner’s Mind)
at Shiseido Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-04-10 - 2014-05-25)

The Tsubaki-kai is a group show held at Shiseido Gallery every year since 1947. While its members change, the exhibition has continued for nearly 70 years. Last year’s joining members were Genpei Akasegawa, Naoya Hatakeyama, Rei Naito, Zon Ito, and Ryoko Aoki. With the March 11th, 2011 disaster prominently in their minds, these new members chose the exhibition subtitle “Shoshin”. According to the New Shinmeikai Kokugo Jiten (Sanseido), the phrase “shoshin” (beginner’s mind) refers to that purity of thought and feeling occurring when one first sets out to do something new. The 14th century Noh actor and playwright Zeami explained the expression “keep a beginner’s mind” as maintaining, throughout all the stages of life, that same spirit of challenge first experienced when first taking up a new endeavor. In the wake of such an unexpected disaster as the earthquake on March 11th in 2011, the process of picking up the pieces and moving forward has furnished these new Tsubaki-kai members with an opportunity to reconsider questions like what a beginner’s mind means, and what their reasons have been for creating things, and this mutual awareness among all of the members led them to select this as the theme for their coming exhibitions. Genpei Akasegawa presents dozens of pencil drawings of classic cameras, Naoya Hatakeyama displays two series of photographs capturing the artificial in natural environments, Rei Naito unveils “Color Beginning”, a new work expressing the origins of color with vivid overlapping hues, Zon Ito exhibits new drawings for “Architecture of Invisible Lands”, a work about the lives of living things that exist alongside human beings, and Ryoko Aoiki offers new watercolors of plants. [Related Event] Special Talk: Naoya Hatakeyama × Kiyokazu Washida (Philosopher, Director of Sendai Mediatheque,Professor at Otani University) Date & Time: May 9th, 2014 18:00 - 20:00 Venue: Shiseido Hanatsubaki Hall (Shiseido Ginza Building 3F) Capacity:150 guests (reservations required) Free Please see the official website for details.

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<![CDATA[“Collection of Museo Poldi Pezzoli: The Aristocratic Palace and its Beauty Milano the Magnificent Collection of the Nobleman”]]> Found: residence

poster for “Collection of Museo Poldi Pezzoli: The Aristocratic Palace and its Beauty Milano the Magnificent Collection of the Nobleman”
“Collection of Museo Poldi Pezzoli: The Aristocratic Palace and its Beauty Milano the Magnificent Collection of the Nobleman”
at Bunkamura Museum of Art (Shibuya area)
(2014-04-04 - 2014-05-25)

The Museo Poldi Pezzoli was originally the residence of the prominent Milanese nobleman Gian Giacomo Poldi Pezzoli and is now open to the public as one of the most significant art museums in Italy. This is the first exhibition in Japan to show the Poldi Pezzoli family’s outstanding collection of art works and ornamental pieces; built up and handed down over many generations. In this exhibition of numerous fine articles, including the masterpiece “Portrait of a Woman” by Piero del Pollaiolo, an important painter of the early Renaissance, one may trace the development of European art from the Renaissance to the 19th century and gain new insights into the magnificence of aristocratic culture. [Image: Piero del Pollaiolo “Portrait of a Woman”]

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1a65217270741f1cf8a8ebed8f2bcde6
<![CDATA[Voices Calling from the Unusual: Hirano Keiichiro’s Selection of Western Art Masterpieces]]> Found: calling, call

Voices Calling from the Unusual: Hirano Keiichiro’s Selection of Western Art Masterpieces
at National Museum Of Western Art, Tokyo (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2014-04-08 - 2014-06-15)

Since his debut novel in 1998, L’Eclipse, the major young writer Keiichiro Hirano has published a string of works reflecting his deep knowledge of Western culture, as well as displaying an visual experimentation with text through letter spacing and margins. Here Hirano takes on the role of guest curator and presents his artistic vision through a selection of works drawn primarily from the NMWA collection. Brought together under the title “Voices Calling from the Unusual”, the works here speak of Hirano’s personal artistic and visual sensibilities, with scenes of wonder and fascination, extending beyond the ordinary, accompanied by Hirano’s own analysis, bringing the visitor’s gaze to meet with that of his own.

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<![CDATA[“Balthus: A Retrospective”]]> Found: entry

poster for “Balthus: A Retrospective”
“Balthus: A Retrospective”
at Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2014-04-19 - 2014-06-22)

Born as Balthasar Michel Klossowski de Rola, Balthus(1908-2001) is respected as one of the last great masters of the 20th century, put on par with Picasso. His silent landscapes which appear to be frozen in time and interior images inhabited by young girls, his ideal of beauty’s perfection, are filled with a mysterious tension which continues to enchant wide audiences. But with his work dispersed between collections across the globe, there have only been rare chances to see collections of his oeuvre in Japan, making this exhibition, the largest retrospective of his work since his death, of marked importance, showcasing 40 oil paintings amongst, sketches and other familiar objects. [Related Event] Family Day Every 3rd Saturday and following Sunday of the month is family day, with half price entry for families with children under 18 years old. Dates: 4/19(Sat), 4/20(Sun), 5/17(Sat), 5/18(Sun), 6/14(Sat), 6/15(Sun)

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<![CDATA[2D Work Award Winners Exhibition]]> Found: award

2D Work Award Winners Exhibition
at Tokyo Wonder Wall (Shinjuku area)
(2013-10-10 - 2014-09-29)

12 artists selected for the Wonder Wall Award from 479 competitors present their work in a relay of solo exhibitions held between October 2013 - September 2014, with an artist talk held each month. Exhibition Schedule Chie Sannami Exhibition Period: 10th October-31st October Opening Talk: 10th October 17:30-18:30 Issei Nishimura Exhibition Period: 7th November-28th November Tsuyoshi Matsunami Exhibition Period: 5th December-26th December Opening Talk: 5th December 17:30-18:30 Mayu Hirota Exhibition Period: 9th January-30th Janurary Opening Talk: 9th January 17:30-18:30 Momi Abe Exhibition Period: 6th February- 27th February Opening Talk: 6th February 17:30-18:30 Shizuka Mitsui Exhibition Period: 6th March-28th March Opening Talk: 6th March 17:30-18:30 Eijiro Saito Exhibition Period: 10th April-30th April Opening Talk: 10th April 17:30-18:30 Saiko Kasajima Exhibition Period: 8th May-29th May Opening Talk: 8th May 17:30-18:30 Hiroaki Ito Exhibition Period: 5th June-26th June Opening Talk: 5th June 17:30-18:30 Narumi Sasaki Exhibition Period: 3rd July-25th July Opening Talk: 3rd July 17:30-18:30 Nanako Mukai Exhibition Period: 7th August-28th August Opening Talk: 7th August 17:30-18:30 Shiro Ishibashi Exhibition Period: 4th September-29th September Gallery Talk: 11th September 12:15-13:00

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e7f90ca18d847a43ec4cea2a7ab8600c
<![CDATA[“Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi 2014”]]> Found: award, jury

poster for “Art <U>Award</U> Tokyo Marunouchi 2014”
“Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi 2014”
at Gyoko-dori Underground Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-04-26 - 2014-05-25)

The “Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi” (hereafter “a.a.t.m.”) is an exhibition of contemporary art which aims to discover and nurture new talent. Besides opening up careers of young artists, the “a.a.t.m.”, held at the Gyoko-dori Underground Gallery, which is directly linked to Tokyo Station and located between the Marunouchi Building and Shin Marunouchi Building, provides even wider encounters with art and encourages artists to achieve their full potential. With a total of 275 artists having been featured in the seven exhibitions held to date, many of these creators have taken this platform as a stepping stone from which to launch their careers nationally and internationally and this year brings a whole new line up placing a spotlight on the cutting edge artists of the next generation. [Related Events] Public Jury Review(open to the public) Date: 4/26(Sat) 10:30- Venue: Gyoko-dori Underground Gallery a.a.t.m Talk Date: 5/10(Sat) Venue: Marunouchi Cafe Seek For further information please refer to the official website.

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<![CDATA[SICF15: Spiral Independent Creators Festival 15]]> Found: awarded, award, jury

poster for SICF15: Spiral Independent Creators Festival 15
SICF15: Spiral Independent Creators Festival 15
at Spiral (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2014-05-03 - 2014-05-06)

This year golden week is set yet again to welcome a flood of over 100 creators upon Spiral Hall as part of the Spiral Independent Creators Festival (SICF). With a tide of unique creativity pouring across the numerous booths and grand prizes awarded by jury panel and audience votes, this show searches out the leading artists and designers of the future. Schedule A 3rd May (Sat)- 4th May (Sun) 11:00-19:00 B 5th May (Mon)- 6th May (Tues) 11:00-19:00 Venue: Spiral Hall (Spiral 3F)

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<![CDATA[Scene and herd: Tracking bison with photographer Edgardo Aragón]]> Found: call, residency
Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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Photo courtesy José Teodoro
Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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Photo courtesy José Teodoro

The latest video project by Edgardo Aragón – a finalist in the 2013 AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize – tracks bison across North American, in Wood Buffalo National Park in the Northwest Territories, in Yellowstone National Park and near Chihuahua in Mexico, his home country. We talked to him about the project, made possible by his AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize residency.

AGO: Of the three places you visited for your project, which was the most surprising, in terms of defying your expectations? Why?
Edgardo Aragón: I was very surprised and still I am about Fort Smith. Given the conditions under which people live in this place, it could seem impossible that there’s life there, but life exists, along with one of the strangest lights that I will ever see in my life.

Since going to these places, has your plan for the project changed?
Whenever I plan a new project, I always expect that the circumstances change the nature of the project itself. In this case the change happened, without a doubt. Natural conditions modify the project a great deal, complementing and giving body to it in a way that a sketch could not. I’m satisfied.

Many animal species migrate – why did you choose to focus on bison?
I chose the bison for two reasons. The first is that it had a natural frontier that would shift according to the climate conditions, modifying substantially the life of the First Nations people who depended on the bison to survive. They would conform to the bison’s behaviour. That’s why the project is not, in fact, trying to create a portrait of bison so much as one of the invisible men that has ceased to live in harmony with it.

The second reason is that this animal species does’t migrate. After nearly becoming extinct at the hands of the white man, it has endured some sort of domestication. Today it is a species in the process of recuperation in Mexico and Canada. It is curious to note that in the U.S., where there are more reserves, the bison is not a protected species and is limited to its territories. This domestication is an aspect of extermination as well, of the animal and its animal nature and, of course, of what little spirit of the First Nations people remains.

Why did you decide to use video for this project instead of still images?
Video is a more organic tool, more malleable. You can move it in many directions to generate a specific discourse or an open one. I think I choose video because I like having elements that are closer to a sense of physical presence, closer to the movement of the apparatus, to the presence of a witness and specifically to the manipulation of time. Duration plays a fundamental role in establishing the dimensions of the theme. The sounds of the places or the absence of such sounds plays a fundamental role in the atmospheres that I’m trying to convey and generate in the project.

When you gave an interview to the Northern Journal, you said, “In a way, the real subject of the video project does not exist…It’s an invisible phantom.” Can you elaborate on that? What is the real subject?
The subject I am portraying is the human who lived with the presence of the bison. That way of life is poorly understood by Eurocentric cultures. That was what I was interested in discovering or portraying. I followed the path of the bison because it represents the way First Nations people lived. All the vacant spaces left around the bison are the spaces left by earlier lives – lives lived within the cultural shock generated by contact with Europe – and the near-extermination of the bison. The creation of reserves for the native people of the Americas were really the extermination of a spirit that generated a sense of life.

With the westernisation of North America a philosophy of life was destroyed – a loss which we have not been able to fully understand yet. This is why I like to think about this video as a portrait of an invisible human being, a portrait of a philosophy of life inherent to the creative and cultural spirit of a human being that disappeared many years ago. The presence of reserves for human and animal species is only one of its forms of annihilation. This is the central objective of the project.

All photos courtesy of the artist. Keep up with this year’s Aimia | AGO Photography Prize on Twitter and Facebook.

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9 April 2014, 12:37 pm cc3c5e91644a0c601b636fb980c42b20
<![CDATA[The 2014 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize: Meet the jury]]> Found: call, residency, submit, awards, award, jury

Voting won’t begin until late summer, but the 2014 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize is well underway. Over the past few months, individuals around the world have been researching and discussing exciting new ideas and directions in fine art photography and putting forward the names of artists whose recent work has shown extraordinary potential. The nominators — a group of 13 curators, critics and artists — submit two artists each for inclusion on the long list, and then a three-person jury selects a short list of four. Later this year, the shortlisted artists’ work will be exhibited at the AGO and online, and the public vote will decide who wins the $50,000 CAD prize.

We’re happy to introduce you to this year’s jury, led by the AGO’s associate curator of photography, Sophie Hackett, and we hope you’ll follow along as the Prize develops in 2014. Keep an eye out for long-list and short-list announcements in the coming months, and follow the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize on Facebook and Twitter for more news.

This year’s jury:

jurorSophie

Sophie Hackett is the Associate Curator, Photography, at the Art Gallery of Ontario and adjunct faculty in Ryerson University’s master’s program in Photographic Preservation and Collections Management. She has contributed to several Canadian art magazines, international journals and monographs, and she has curated or co-curated several exhibitions and public projects at the AGO, including Suzy Lake: Rhythm of a True Space (2008); Barbara Kruger: Untitled (It) (2010); “Where I was born…”: A Photograph, a Clue and the Discovery of Abel Boulineau (2011); Songs of the Future: Canadian Industrial Photographs, 1858 to Today (2011); Album: A Public Project (2012) and Light My Fire: Some Propositions about Portraits and Photography (2013-2014), a wide-ranging consideration of the photographic portrait, drawn from the AGO’s permanent collection. Upcoming projects include What It Means To be Seen: Photography and Queer Visibility and Fan the Flames: Queer Positions in Photography — both opening in June 2014. She is the lead juror for the 2014 AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize, a role she also held in 2010 and 2012.


Laurie Simmons

Laurie Simmons (b.1949, USA) stages photographs and films with paper dolls, finger puppets, ventriloquist dummies and costumed dancers as “living objects,” animating a dollhouse world suffused with nostalgia and colored by an adult’s memories, longings, and regrets. Simmons’ work blends psychological, political, and conceptual approaches to art-making, transforming photography’s propensity to objectify people, especially women, into a sustained critique of the medium. She has received many awards, including the Roy Lichtenstein Residency in the Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome (2005), and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1997) and the National Endowment for the Arts (1984). She has had major exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Baltimore Museum of Art; San Jose Museum of Art, California; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and she has participated in two Whitney Biennial exhibitions (1985, 1991) and was included in the 2013 Venice Biennial. Her work is represented in many noted collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others.


HDK-Enwezor-Photo-Jeff-Weiner

Okwui Enwezor is a Nigerian-born, German-based scholar, curator, and writer and has been director of Haus der Kunst since October 2011. He was adjunct curator at International Center of Photography, New York, and previously adjunct curator of Contemporary Art, at the Art Institute of Chicago. Enwezor has served as the artistic director of several leading biennials and international exhibitions and in December 2013 he was appointed as director of the Visual Arts Sector of the 56th Biennale di Venezia. Enwezor’s curatorial credits include exhibitions presented in museums and venues across the U.S., Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, including Guggenheim Museum, Tate Modern, Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art Barcelona, Museo Tamayo, Mexico City, Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels, PS1 / MoMA, New York and the National Gallery of Canada. Enwezor has received numerous awards and honors for his work including an honourary fellowship from the Royal College of Art, London (2010) and an award for Curatorial Excellence from Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture, Bard College (2009). He lives in Munich and New York.


This year’s nominators were:

  • Grant Arnold, Audain Curator of British Columbia Art, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver
  • Veronica Cordeiro, curator, Centro de Fotografía de Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Moyra Davey, artist and nominee for the 2010 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize (then called the Grange Prize)
  • Jon Davies, associate curator, Oakville Galleries
  • Gary Dufour, adjunct associate professor, University of Western Australia and former chief curator/deputy director, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth
  • Tamar Garb, Durning Lawrence Professor in the History of Art, University College, London, U.K.
  • Gauri Gill, artist and winner of the 2011 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize (then called the Grange Prize)
  • Marie-Josée Jean, head of the VOX Contemporary Image Centre, Montreal
  • Mami Kataoka, chief curator, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo
  • Beatrix Ruf, director/curator, Kunsthalle Zürich, Zurich
  • Jonathan Shaughnessy, associate curator, Contemporary Art, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa
  • Brian Sholis, associate curator of Photography at the Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati
  • Kim Simon, curator, Gallery TPW, Toronto

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31 March 2014, 10:00 am 53c387052a13298c7f421c0507e7d68e
<![CDATA[Time to party: MASSIVE 10 artist projects and entertainment]]> Found: call, awarded, awards, award
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On April 10, 2014, see artwork by Katie Bethune-Leamen, Bruno Billio, Jorden Blue Doody & David James Doody, Randy Grskovic, Sean Martindale, Hazel Meyer, Talwst and Artistic Director Justin Broadbent created exclusively for MASSIVE 10, the 10th anniversary of the AGO’s Massive Party fundraiser. In addition to these artists, we’re pleased to announce a musical lineup that will keep guests dancing all night long, including DJ Filthy Gorgeous, DJ Soundbwoy, Johnny Hockin and Joseph Of Mercury / Joseph & The Mercurials. Guests will also be treated to a birthday fête at the Aimia Photo Booth by Melanie Cantwell Designs where they will receive a memento of the evening. Guests will also be invited to interact with the Absolut Vodka installation by MAKELAB.

Massive Party tickets have sold out for the past four years running, so get your tickets now!

Artists and project details

Justin Broadbent
Justin Broadbent
Katie Bethune-Leamen
Katie Bethune-Leamen
Bruno Billio
Bruno Billio
Photo: Jade Rude
Jorden & David Doody
Jorden & David Doody
Randy Grskovic
Randy Grskovic
Sean_Martindale
Sean_Martindale
Photo: Cindy Blazevic.
Hazel Meyer
Hazel Meyer
Talwst
Talwst
Melanie Cantwell
Melanie Cantwell

Justin Broadbent
Justin Broadbent is back for his second year as Massive Party’s Artistic Director after the hugely successful Massive Party GOLD in 2013. He is an accomplished Toronto-based multi-disciplinary artist. His portfolio includes works in video performance, poems, funny ideas, illustration, design, shirt design, music video direction and installation. Justin is also a self-taught photographer. As a video director, Justin has worked with bands such as Shad, Metric, Serena Ryder and Classified. He has been nominated for five MuchMusic Video Awards, including Rock Video of the Year and Hip Hop Video of the Year. Justin’s other awards include a Juno for Record Package of the Year and a CBC Bucky Award for Music Video of the Year. Justin makes a point of choosing layered projects that challenge his expectations. His work often centres around meaning-of-life topics, which he delivers with a glimmer of charm and wit. Justin’s work is inspired by the impossibility of a seed becoming a tree, thrift stores, clever lyrics and human perseverance. He spends his spare time outdoors, looking at the world as if for the first time and adding to his collection of porcelain cat figurines that adorn the mantle of his Toronto home. Justin also likes rappers Creemore and David Shrigley.

Katie Bethune-Leamen
Katie Bethune-Leamen works in installation, sculpture, video and drawing. She received a BFA from Concordia University (Montreal) and a MFA from the University of Guelph. Katie has exhibited across Canada, in Iceland, Japan, France, Australia, the USA, the Netherlands, England, Australia and other countries. Recent solo exhibitions include Shiny Object Person (Young Gallery, Art Gallery of Ontario). Recent residencies include Fogo Island Arts (Fogo Island, NL) and SIM (Reykjavik, IS), with ones upcoming at the Illulissat Art Museum (Ilulissat, GD) and The American Museum of Natural History (NYC). In 2012 Rick Rhodes, editor of Canadian Art magazine, listed her as one of the “Top 3 of 2012.” Katie is the recipient of numerous grants and awards. Her writing has appeared in Canadian Art, C Magazine, Border Crossings and others.

At MASSIVE 10 Katie will be bringing 10 artists into the Gallery to participate in art creation throughout the evening. Guests won’t want to miss the chance to watch creativity live as artists interpret the same reference image in 10 different ways.

Bruno Billio
Bruno Billio is a Canadian artist working from an interdisciplinary background. At once an installation artist, a sculptor and a designer, Bruno creates challenging works informed by his command of each of these practices. He is currently living and working in Toronto, and has been the resident artist at the Gladstone Hotel on Queen West, in the fashionable art gallery district in Toronto, for the past few years. Bruno Billio’s artistic practice is informed by the active displacement and staging of the found object, a contemporary art strategy with a historically established lineage. The everyday is reinterpreted through its spatial and contextual re-appropriation by the artist, who presents himself by proxy as both an interventionist and an inventor. Bruno has exhibited internationally in Milan, London, Miami, New York and Los Angeles. Bruno was also Massive Party’s Artistic Director from 2010-12 – shaping the vision for Massive Party Speakeasy, Marchesa Luisa Casati’s Massive Party and #thefutureofartis.

Jorden Blue Doody & David James Doody
Jorden Blue & David James Doody are both graduates from the University of British Columbia in Critical and Creative Studies. Although each artist offers a uniquely individual approach to the discourse of visual arts, they share a common focus on the materialism of cultural codification. Their combined individual practices have been heavily influenced by world travel and the cross pollination of mass media, ritual and fetishistic cultures. Their practice moves freely between new media, sculpture, and painting.

“As a collaborative team for the past seven years, we believe that communication has been the foundation of our artistic relationship. A common thread that can be traced throughout our work is that of collage. By sampling freely from a multitude of different sources, we are able to access unlimited individual histories, societal contexts and cultural symbols. For us, collage is more than just cut and paste, it is an immediate sense of being; it is our way of participating in the re-contextualization of our unfolding culture.” Through their open processes of art-making they allow happenstance to regurgitate cultural intuition in an act of artistic survival.

Randy Grskovic
Randy Grskovic is an artist and curator living in Toronto, Ontario. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts, in Advanced Media communication, from the University of British Columbia, Okanagan. Randy has shown his artwork and curated others in exhibitions across Canada at galleries including Equinox and Centre A in Vancouver, V-Tape in Toronto, L’oeil de Poison in Quebec City and Eastern Edge in St. John’s, NL. Randy is the former owner of experimental short-term galleries including The Age of Info(rmation), Cutty Contemporary and Good Luck Art Gallery.

For MASSIVE 10, Randy will be honouring the AGO on a milestone event, congratulating all the Massive Party attendees who help make programming at the gallery possible, as well as cheering on the artists who helped create MASSIVE 10. His piece will provide encouragement to all involved while highlighting the spectacle inherent in the event. Don’t miss out on receiving the recognition you deserve as a Massive Party attendee.

Sean Martindale
Sean Martindale is an emerging and internationally recognized interdisciplinary artist and designer currently based in Toronto, Canada. His interventions activate public and semi-public spaces to encourage engagement, often focused on ecological and social issues. Sean’s playful works question and suggest alternate possibilities for existing spaces, infrastructures and materials found in the urban environment. Frequently, Sean uses salvaged goods and live plants in unexpected ways that prompt conversations and interaction.

Sean’s projects have been featured on countless prominent sites online, as well as in traditional media such as print, radio, broadcast television and film. His practice has a global following and has been written about in countries all around the world, and in multiple languages. Sean was profiled for the first episode of the CBC’s Great Minds of Design, one of his lectures was filmed by TVO for their Big Ideas series, and his work was also included in the feature-length documentary This Space Available, released in 2011.

Hazel Meyer
Hazel Meyer is a visual artist and sports enthusiast based in Toronto. She draws pictures, text and comics, makes letterpress prints, screen-printed multiples, broadcasts and constructs physical environments that are used for performance, collaboration, workshops and amateur athletics. From the monumental to the modest her projects range from immersive installations, to small woven tags meant for an audience of one. Much like the tag line of The Litter Game, a collaborative project she started with Lucy Pawlak and Jim Skuldt in 2013, her practice is devoted to a forever shifting ratio of endurance, transgression and laughs, as ways of being in one’s body and the world. She holds an MFA from OCAD University (Toronto), a BFA from Concordia University (Montréal) and shows her work in galleries, artist-run centers and festivals inter/nationally.

Keep an eye out throughout MASSIVE 10 for Hazel’s presentation of NADIA! NADIA! The piece centres around the 1976 Montréal Olympic Games and 14 year old Romanian gymnast Nadia Comăneci who received what was then the first ever 10 to be awarded at the Olympics. The scoreboard used at the time had not been engineered for the four numbers that make up an Olympic 10 (10.00), so it was displayed as 1.00. This moment of utter physical prowess and domination is made even more radical by the inability of the technology to be able to represent it. This discord is the starting point for NADIA! NADIA!.

TALWST
His practice is a study in extremes. As a musical performer, TALWST (né Curtis Santiago) is larger-than-life. As a visual artist, he has spent the better part of six years building miniature dioramas, entire worlds that fit in the palm of your hand. TALWST creates exquisite landscapes inhabited by vivid characters—hand-painted and reconstructed Preiser’s figurines—freezing memories and moments inside reclaimed ring boxes. From 2007 to 2010, he apprenticed under Aboriginal artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun. In the past six years, TALWST has had six solo exhibitions in Toronto, New York, Edmonton and Vancouver. As a recording artist, he’s collaborated with Grammy-winning producer Illangelo to release his fourth solo album, Alien Tentacle Sex, to international acclaim in 2012.

For MASSIVE 10, TALWST is scaling up and exploring interactivity and spectatorship in a one-night-only piece. Dynasty 10-0 plays off the Massive party theme, 10, and builds on previous artwork examining Canadiana, race and identity construction. For Dynasty 10-0, TALWST is incorporating new media, textiles and performance. Influenced more by Trinidad and Tobago’s Carnival than participatory art, TALWST seeks to create the same spirit of role-play, interaction and fete. Instead of traditional Carnival characters he has cast actors to portray hockey players and coach dressing for the fictional team the Massives. The participation of event attendees will play a pivotal part in how this happening unfolds.

Melanie Cantwell
Melanie Cantwell is an interior decorator, stylist and set designer. Originally from Prince Edward Island, Melanie now resides in downtown Toronto and has a number of art and interior design-based projects on her list of accomplishments, ranging from residential clients and styling for a variety of design-based photo shoots. Melanie is currently the set decorator on the Steven and Chris show on CBC where she oversees the set styling and manages the look and aesthetic of each individual segment. Melanie studied fine arts and graduated with accreditations in advertising and marketing from Sheridan College and interior decorating from George Brown College.

At MASSIVE 10, see Melanie’s set design at the Aimia photo booth. Guests will be able to have their photos taken while wishing the AGO’s Massive Party a “Happy 10th Birthday” surrounded by sweet confections, balloons and other special touches befitting of this milestone celebration.

Filthy Gorgeous
Filthy Gorgeous is the seductive alias of Toronto born DJ, Kristin Leeder. After bursting onto the scene in 2007, Filthy Gorgeous forged an identity with sensual, rhythmic styles that immediately set her apart from her peers. With sets that draw on cutting edge dance music Filthy Gorgeous has become known for a sound that is both rich and complex. She has performed with and received praise from the world’s top international superstar musician/DJs such as Skrillex, Drake, Disclosure, Annie Mac, Nero, Flight Facilities, The Twelves, Tensnake, Theophiles London, Fred Falk and Alvin Risk.

From playing at local Toronto hot spot, The Hoxton, to sold out shows at The Fillmore Miami Beach, New York’s Webster Hall, a regular at various SOHO House locations and special events during Winter Music Conference (WMC), Filthy Gorgeous always leaves the crowd wanting more. A favourite amongst the fashion crowd she has developed long-lasting relationships and played events for some of the world’s leading Fashion and Lifestyle brands. Filthy Gorgeous continues to win fans by building her reputation as an exciting international DJ talent. Constantly evolving and never afraid to take risks, she has made it clear that Filthy Gorgeous is one to watch out for.

Johnny Hockin
Johnny Hockin is a Canadian DJ, musician and multimedia producer. He is a local Toronto fixture, using his wide-ranging taste and an eclectic repertoire to link classic soul, disco, rock, hip hop and electronic music into a sound uniquely his own. He consistently plays for high-end corporate clients and some of the city’s favourite rooms (from Soho House to Thomson to the Drake Hotel to L’Oreal Fashion Week).

He is also known to many Canadians as the former face of movies on MTV Canada, interviewing hundreds of filmmakers and stars. Over the course of 5 years, Ryan Gosling brooded with him, Nic Cage looked at him funny, George Clooney charmed him, Jason Bateman made fun of his name and Justin Timberlake sang to him. Werner Herzog follows him on twitter.

DJ Soundbwoy
Wake up world. Wake up to the aural mindtrip that is the Soundbwoy experience. Born and raised in Toronto, Canada – the city that comes alive when everyone else is asleep – Soundbwoy is the embodiment of what is needed to lead the next generation of music connoisseurs into a new dimension of existence. Unbound by convention, Soundbwoy offers those in attendance the ability to transcend the dance floor and travel on paths only found in dream sequences. He is far from mash up yet incapable of being categorized by any one genre; a musical everyman blessed with the gift of virtuosity behind the turntables. From soulful gems found through countless hours of crate digging to the most ominous of house anthems from the sun swept beaches of Ibiza, a Soundbwoy party is like travelling with a master storyteller crafting his latest fairytale while touching the deepest parts of your imagination. Feel the party transform into your personal looking glass and let Soundbwoy guide you through his universe like no one else can.
Wake up world.

Joseph & The Mercurials / Joseph Of Mercury
Born to the dying synthesized bells of the 80s. Reincarnated from the velvet gentleman of the 50s. Stark Dark & Echo Heavy. Influenced more by the haunting sounds of nature & cinema than by music itself, Joseph spins cavernous worlds of light & ocean, longing & romance… all with nothing more than his voice & the mournful call of a swooning guitar. Seduced by the beauty of fashion & design, enraptured in its drama & detail, Joseph cloaks himself in the colours of their world, as they are enveloped by the echoes of his sound. Each song has found its rightful place among the works of Victoria’s Secret, RW&Co., Members Only, Stockholm S/S/A/W, Fashion Magazine, & V Spain. As if by desire & fate. Desire is everything.

For more information about MASSIVE 10, visit massiveparty.ca.

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21 March 2014, 3:07 pm c572ad285d4f84f7e090e03a985be71d
<![CDATA[Saying goodbye to The Great Upheaval (and thanks to our visitors)]]> Found: opportunity

More than 140,000 people visited The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910-1918 at the Art Gallery of Ontario between November 30, 2013, and March 2, 2014. The exhibition was a rare opportunity to see works by a large group of outstanding artists — including Chagall, Kandinsky, Matisse, Modigliani, Mondrian and Picasso — from the collection of the Guggenheim Museum, New York.

The exhibition’s attendance ranks it close to other recent popular exhibitions at the Gallery: Ai Weiwei: According to What? and David Bowie is both drew crowds of about 145,000 each.

Thanks to everyone who helped bring it together, inside and outside the Gallery, especially to our friends at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, lead sponsor BMO Financial Group, generous supporters Gail & Mark Appel and Joan & Jerry Lozinski and hotel partner Eaton Chelsea Toronto. And to all 142,360 of you who visited the exhibition: we hope you’ll be back. Keep sharing your thoughts with us on Facebeook and at @agotoronto on Twitter and Instagram.

The Guggenheim exhibit at the @agotoronto was the best exhibit I've seen at the AGO yet! Definetly worth a visit if your in #Toronto #Art

— Jessica Lim (@jessica_m_lim) February 17, 2014

Very cool to see @agotoronto's Great Upheaval exhibition jam-packed today. Stunning collection and such a great way to spend a Sunday.

— ashley bursey (@ashbursey) February 9, 2014

The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910-1918 was made possible by lead sponsor BMO Financial Group, generous supporters Gail & Mark Appel and Joan & Jerry Lozinski and hotel partner Eaton Chelsea Toronto.

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20 March 2014, 9:00 am 05ac2fd9bc7157ed88ee345d37ed6f73
<![CDATA[Conservation Notes: Kress Fellow Tessa Thomas and posters of the Belle Époque]]> Found: calls, call, opportunity, awards, award
Tessa Thomas and a Toulouse-Lautrec poster.

Tessa Thomas and a Toulouse-Lautrec poster.

The Samuel H. Kress Foundation provides yearly grants to cultural heritage institutions to support a conservation training fellowship; only nine awards for Kress Conservation Fellowships were presented for the 2013/2014 year and the AGO is pleased that the foundation selected us to receive a grant. Maria Sullivan, manager of Conservation at the AGO, calls the fellowship for emerging conservators — administered by the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation — “a unique opportunity for the AGO and for conservation training in Canada.”

“Having a Kress Fellow here in the AGO Paper Conservation Lab is such a wonderful way to engage with our fabulous collection, with dynamic discussion and sharing of conservation principles and techniques within a large collecting institution,” says Joan Weir, the AGO’s conservator, Works on Paper.

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Fabric lining on the verso of a poster, 'Le Photographe Sescau' by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.
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Top edge with visible threads from poster lining. 'Le Photographe Sescau' by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

As our Samuel H. Kress Fellow in Conservation, Tessa Thomas’s work is focused on the conservation of Ross R. Scott and Donald R. Muller’s recent remarkable donation to the Gallery: more than 75 posters, prints and drawings by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and artists in his circle. The poster revolution of the late 19th century transformed the city of Paris, created an obsession with colour lithography among leading artists and shaped the future of printmaking, poster design and advertising. More than a century later we are still captivated by images of the notorious celebrities of the Belle Époque and with the ambiance of the cabarets, cafés and dance halls.

To begin, Thomas completed a condition survey of the collection to identify the overall condition of works within the donation and to distinguish the unique characteristics of each work by visual examination. The initial survey gave insight into the broad spectrum of materials within the collection and provided interesting findings. For example, there are a few posters that have revenue stamps that denote which posters may have been displayed publicly when they were first printed in the late 19th century. Many of the posters show ink stamps, but one poster in the collection has a unique paper stamp, as seen below.

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The range in size of the posters is also quite significant, with the largest posters measuring between 160 to 164 centimetres high by 115 to 122 centimetres wide. Any major conservation treatment of these works is sure to present unique challenges and require special considerations. As a result, the next step for the treatment of the collection will be to determine treatment priorities and develop a treatment methodology for the posters. Thomas’s research into the production of Belle Époque posters includes looking into the history and practice of the lining of posters, including past and present preservation techniques. Look out for more posts on her progress as the project continues.

About Tessa
Tessa Thomas is the current Samuel H. Kress Fellow in Conservation at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Tessa is a graduate of the Queen’s University Master of Art Conservation Program and was the recipient of the 2011 Emerging Conservator Award presented by the Canadian Association for Conservation of Cultural Property (CAC). Tessa specializes in the conservation of paper objects and brings with her experience in conservation and collections care from cultural heritage institutions in Canada and abroad, including The National Archives, London, England; the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Royal Ontario Museum and the Archives of Ontario.


Curious about Conservation?
If you have a burning question about Conservation, leave a comment below. We’ll do our best to give you an answer in an upcoming Conservation Notes post.


Signature Partner of the AGO’s Conservation Program


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19 March 2014, 10:28 am fe9756d6e55bab97a320837b75d11f8a
<![CDATA[Listen: Meet the Artist, with Paul Graham]]> Found: awarded, award
Paul Graham, Untitled (Smoking girl in orange light)Paul Graham,
Untitled (Smoking girl in orange light), 1996–98, from the series end of an age.
Chromogenic print, 179.5 x 133.7 cm.
Gift of Alison and Alan Schwartz, 2000. 2000/1348 © Paul Graham; courtesy Pace Gallery and Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York.

Click to play:

Download 57.1MB MP3

Recorded: Oct. 17, 2013, at Jackman Hall, Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 1:23:13

Paul Graham is a British photographer based in New York. Lauded as “a profound force for renewal of the deep photographic tradition of engagement with the world,” he was awarded the 2012 Hasselblad award for major achievements in photography.

In conjunction with the exhibition Light My Fire: Some Propositions about Portraits and Photography

Generously supported by Penny Rubinoff

Signature Partner, Photography Collection Program

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10 March 2014, 10:00 am 007d3c123c112569002a8298619a0984
<![CDATA[Eiki Mori “Intimacy”]]> Found: award

poster for Eiki Mori “Intimacy”
Eiki Mori “Intimacy”
at IMA Concept Store (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2014-03-15 - 2014-04-20)

IMA Books presents nine works from Eiki Mori’s photo collection “Intimacy” in celebration of its acceptance of the 39th Kimura Ihei Award. [Related Event] Photography Workshop “Another Intimacy” Participants explore another kind of intimacy as they join to make fake couples and fake families especially for the camera. Photographer: Eiki Mori Date: April 19(Sat) 19:00- Admission: ¥6000

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<![CDATA[Mt. Rokko International Photo Festival Official Event: Portfolio Exhibition]]> Found: residence

poster for Mt. Rokko International Photo Festival Official Event: Portfolio Exhibition
Mt. Rokko International Photo Festival Official Event: Portfolio Exhibition
at 3331 Arts Chiyoda (Chiyoda area)
(2014-04-12 - 2014-04-20)

Portfolios are collections of work that encapsulate the artistic perspectives of their photographers. By presenting the portfolios of many photographers and showcasing the diversity of contemporary photography, this exhibition invites viewers to contemplate significance of this creative age and examine the role of the artist in society. Venues: Artists-in-Residence Rm. 203 (exhibition), 2F gymnasium (opening talk), B105 (artists’ talk, wrap-up & closing party) [Related Events] Opening Talk Date: Apr. 13 (Sun) from 14:00 Fee: ¥3000 Artists’ Talk, Wrap-up & Closing Party Date: Apr. 19 (Sat) from 16:00 Free Please see the official website for details.

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<![CDATA[Eiki Mori “Intimacy”]]> Found: award

poster for Eiki Mori “Intimacy”
Eiki Mori “Intimacy”
at Konica Minolta Plaza (Shinjuku area)
(2014-04-15 - 2014-04-24)

Displaying 30 works from Eiki Mori’s “Intimacy” series, winner of the 39th Ihei Kimura Award. These snapshots of private moments during a year in the life of Mori and his lover do not rely on any special techniques, but poignantly portray the authenticity of their relationship from a perspective not bound by preconceived notions.

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<![CDATA[Christian Aschman “The Space in Between”]]> Found: residency

poster for Christian Aschman “The Space in Between”
Christian Aschman “The Space in Between”
at Youkobo Art Space (Musashino, Tama area)
(2014-04-19 - 2014-04-27)

Christian is a freelance photographer living in Luxembourg and Brussels. For the residency at Youkobo Art Space in March and April 2014, residency which is supported by the Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, Christian chose to work on the space “in between”, the space which separates, the space which joins. The search and research of space in a collection of images taken in Tokyo in March and April 2014. His work will be shown in the Open studio at Youkobo Art Space and an exhibition will be held at the Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.

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<![CDATA[Yosuke Takeda “Stay Gold— Digital Flare”]]> Found: entry

poster for Yosuke Takeda “Stay Gold— Digital Flare”
Yosuke Takeda “Stay Gold— Digital Flare”
at Kurenboh Chohouin Buddhist Temple Gallery (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2014-03-26 - 2014-04-27)

“Stay Gold,” the title of this exhibition, comes from the 1983 Francis Ford Coppola film “The Outsiders.” Photographer Yusuke Takeda attempts to capture the light contained in moments precisely because they are difficult to preserve. “Digital Flare” is a new series produced with (allegedly) wrong techniques. It shows, in a simple way, that photography (straight photography) is not a record of reality. Takeda uses camera lenses from past decades to show the contrast between natural and artificial “remnants of light.” Open 10:00–4:00 on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday by appointment only (please email for reservations). Only one viewer may enter the space at a time. Last entry at 3:00.

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<![CDATA[Yuki Toyama + Taiji Kawai “Piano and Forest Presents: Osorezan”]]> Found: award

poster for Yuki Toyama + Taiji Kawai “Piano and Forest Presents: Osorezan”
Yuki Toyama + Taiji Kawai “Piano and Forest Presents: Osorezan”
at G/P Gallery (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2014-04-11 - 2014-04-27)

G/P Gallery is pleased to announce its next exhibition, “Osorezan”, presented by Piano and Forest, a publishing label founded by Yuki Toyama and Taiji Kawai in 2012. Toyama graduated with a degree in Visual Arts and was selected for the Hitotsubo Award in 2006. Her work has been featured in several solo exhibitions and group shows both in Japan and abroad. “Osorezan” is composed of photography by Toyama and text by Kawai. These works were first presented in planetary photo books before the “Osorezan Poster Edition” was published by Piano and Forest. How do the independent forms of photography and text share a single space? Is this even possible? This exhibition raises and attempts to answer these questions. The “Osorezan” planetary photo books, the “Osorezan Poster Edition”, and other related works will be on sale during the exhibition.

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<![CDATA[Tsubaki-kai 2014— Shoshin (Beginner’s Mind)]]> Found: opportunity

poster for Tsubaki-kai 2014— Shoshin (Beginner’s Mind)
Tsubaki-kai 2014— Shoshin (Beginner’s Mind)
at Shiseido Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-04-10 - 2014-05-25)

The Tsubaki-kai is a group show held at Shiseido Gallery every year since 1947. While its members change, the exhibition has continued for nearly 70 years. Last year’s joining members were Genpei Akasegawa, Naoya Hatakeyama, Rei Naito, Zon Ito, and Ryoko Aoki. With the March 11th, 2011 disaster prominently in their minds, these new members chose the exhibition subtitle “Shoshin”. According to the New Shinmeikai Kokugo Jiten (Sanseido), the phrase “shoshin” (beginner’s mind) refers to that purity of thought and feeling occurring when one first sets out to do something new. The 14th century Noh actor and playwright Zeami explained the expression “keep a beginner’s mind” as maintaining, throughout all the stages of life, that same spirit of challenge first experienced when first taking up a new endeavor. In the wake of such an unexpected disaster as the earthquake on March 11th in 2011, the process of picking up the pieces and moving forward has furnished these new Tsubaki-kai members with an opportunity to reconsider questions like what a beginner’s mind means, and what their reasons have been for creating things, and this mutual awareness among all of the members led them to select this as the theme for their coming exhibitions. Genpei Akasegawa presents dozens of pencil drawings of classic cameras, Naoya Hatakeyama displays two series of photographs capturing the artificial in natural environments, Rei Naito unveils “Color Beginning”, a new work expressing the origins of color with vivid overlapping hues, Zon Ito exhibits new drawings for “Architecture of Invisible Lands”, a work about the lives of living things that exist alongside human beings, and Ryoko Aoiki offers new watercolors of plants. [Related Event] Special Talk: Naoya Hatakeyama × Kiyokazu Washida (Philosopher, Director of Sendai Mediatheque,Professor at Otani University) Date & Time: May 9th, 2014 18:00 - 20:00 Venue: Shiseido Hanatsubaki Hall (Shiseido Ginza Building 3F) Capacity:150 guests (reservations required) Free Please see the official website for details.

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<![CDATA[”Young Portfolio Acquisitions 2013”]]> Found: submit, entries

poster for ”Young Portfolio Acquisitions 2013”
”Young Portfolio Acquisitions 2013”
at Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts (Greater Tokyo area)
(2014-03-21 - 2014-06-29)

Unlike many other competitions this event allows artists under 35 to submit their work as many times as they wish and allows the possibility for their work to be selected for acquisition on numerous occasions. This contest seeks out the strength of expression and promise of future progress, with high originality which breaks out of established frames. Through the collection of young artists’ work this event aims to add further courage to emerging creatives and further disseminate their work through databases and publishing. This event was first initiated in 1995 and up until now has received over 100,000 entries from 74 countries around the world, creating a platform to engage with artists of numerous regions, perspectives and approaches which we will come to see blossom even further in the future.

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<![CDATA[Yutaka Kamimura “Call My Name— The Dogs and Cats Living in the Nuclear Disaster Zone”]]> Found: call, residency

poster for Yutaka Kamimura “<U>Call</U> My Name— The Dogs and Cats Living in the Nuclear Disaster Zone”
Yutaka Kamimura “Call My Name— The Dogs and Cats Living in the Nuclear Disaster Zone”
at Gallery ef (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2014-04-23 - 2014-05-26)

The explosion at Fukushima Nuclear Reactor 1 in March, 2011 resulted in a high concentration of radioactive material falling on the village of Iitate, which lies within a 30–50 kilometer radius of the plant. After more than a month of confusion, the entire village was designated as an evacuation zone, and residency there for its more than six thousand former inhabitants is still restricted today. As pets are not permitted in the temporary evacuation housing, for three years now dogs and cats have been kept by virtually homeless owners in a place that has lost its assumption of a normal lifestyle. Cat photographer Yutaka Kamimura, who continues to feed these animals, presents a two-year documentation of life in photographs of dogs and cats that continue to survive against the backdrops of a beautiful mountain town and its season scenery and the cruelty of the nuclear disaster.

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<![CDATA[11 Years of Maco]]> Found: residence

poster for 11 Years of Maco
11 Years of Maco
at Space 8 (Shibuya area)
(2014-04-25 - 2014-05-04)

Taken from an animal home, Maco the cat has now been in residence for 11 years, and is featured here along with playmates Shion, Shirotaro and Eita, also accompanied by collaborative video installation from filmmaker Hiroyuki Otani and artist BAL.

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<![CDATA[Days Japan International Photojournalism Award 2014]]> Found: submit, award, jury

poster for Days Japan International Photojournalism <U>Award</U> 2014
Days Japan International Photojournalism Award 2014
at Konica Minolta Plaza (Shinjuku area)
(2014-04-25 - 2014-05-08)

Since 2005 Konica Minolta Plaza has collaborated with the photo journalism magazine “Days Japan” to exhibit works divulging the true shape of the world through the eyes of photo journalists across the globe. This year more than 6,000 photos were submitted in the 10th annual competition. On display are the winners of the first, second, and third Grand Prizes, the Special Jury Prize, and a Public Prize. A special selection of Days Japan’s popular “Surprising Animal Photos” is also presented.

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<![CDATA[#Rorschcam NYC]]> Found: call, residency

I just arrived in New York for a three-month residency at Eyebeam. I had a rough first week, but on Monday fellow resident Ingrid Burrington showed me the Department of Transport’s online traffic cameras for New York City. I’d wanted to do a new rorsch-thing for a while (see, previously, Rorschmap and Rorschmap: Street View Edition) – and, as the streetview version was a little love letter to London, I thought I could redeem myself with this city by making it something nice: so I did.

rorschcam1

#Rorschcam NYC takes hundreds of live New York traffic cameras, from all five boroughs, and makes what I call rorsches out of them; simple, reflected auto-images – or the network dreaming the city.

They look pretty great at night too (see this Flickr set for more screen captures – but they’re better live):

rorschcam2

Like the city itself, it’s a little grimmer, a little darker than London. And then you start to see the stories. Have fun exploring.

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11 March 2014, 11:35 am 9d893baf571b3918983210bdf10ccc4a
<![CDATA[Planespotting]]> Found: call

Today is International Migrants Day. Last week, I wrote about the failed deportation of Isa Muaza. Yesterday, Unity Centre Glasgow announced that another appeal by Muaza’s legal team had failed, and he was rescheduled for deportation, alongside a large number of others, on Tuesday night.

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I heard at about 7pm that several detainees had been loaded onto vans at Harmondsworth Detention Centre and were on the move. I didn’t know where they were headed, but I knew that many previous flights had left from the private aviation area at Stansted Airport, a largely un-signposted collection of car parks and hangars on the western side of the airport. I arrived there at 8, just in time to see the first of several coaches and security vans, together with a police escort, arrive at the Inflite Jet Centre, a private customs and handling facility mostly used by private jets.

The coaches, five in all and probably from several different detention centres, arrived between 8 and 9, and were accompanied by silver vans bearing the logo of security company Tascor, formerly Reliance, who took over the role of deportation escorts from G4S in 2011 following the death of Jimmy Mubenga. Tascor has a page on its website called Our Values, where it boasts: “We steer clear of politics”. Most of the coaches were from WH Tours in Crawley, although one bore the bright yellow sun and jaunty typography of Just Go!

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It is profoundly uncomfortable watching anonymous people of colour being loaded on and off vans and planes in the middle of the night under tight security. When you know a little of the background of the detainees, when you read their claims of torture and violence, their long battles to secure asylum, the institutional racism and homophobia, it’s terrible. But even without knowing these things, the manner in which it is done should tell you everything you need to know. The British Human Rights lawyer Gareth Peirce writes in Dispatches from the Dark Side, on UK complicity in torture, that “what is in fact the law precisely mirrors instinctive moral revulsion” but that “in this country, the government hardly needs such acceptance, since here the additional and crucial factor is that the public is unlikely to be given sufficient information to trigger revulsion.” Hence the night, the private terminals, charter flights, the hired coaches. All of this is deliberate: it is a policy of not being seen.

The detainees were kept on the coaches for some time, and there appeared to be some confusion about when they were going to depart. It’s standard practice in this situation to bring extra “reserve” deportees to the airport without warning, a practice condemned as inhumane by some MPs and the Inspector of Prisons. Before deportation, each detainee is issued with a plane ticket which gives the flight time – 22:20hrs in this case – and a flight number. As the flights are chartered, the flight number – here PVT091 – is internal, so it’s impossible to find out more details about it, except by going to the airport. The Home Office has been running deportation charter flights for some time, under as much secrecy as they can get away with, and refuses to disclose the companies involved in case it damages their commercial relationships. The ongoing deportation of Nigerians on charter flights is called “Operation Majestic”, but there are regular flights to many other countries, including “popular destinations” such as Pakistan and Afghanistan. Corporate Watch published a comprehensive report on what they call collective expulsion last month.

Blog_02

On the tarmac by the jet centre sat a Titan Airways 767. Titan Airways is based at Stansted, and describes itself as “the UK’s most prestigious charter airline.” Its fleet ranges from small business aircraft to widebodied airliners:

Since it’s foundation in 1988, Titan Airways has grown into the UK’s most prestigious charter airline, specialising in bespoke air charter, tour operator programmes and high end / corporate air travel as well as airline sub charter and aircraft leasing. It brings the very best standards of care and comfort to all its passengers. Once safely aboard, they can relax and enjoy our superb in-flight service and a wide choice of cuisine and fine wines to complete the experience. Titan’s modern, reliable aircraft can operate from all major international and regional airports day and night, 365 days a year.

It’s cold, and wet, and dark, and some of the deportees have been sitting on board coaches for hours, while Tascor guards mill about, smoke and chat. As it approached midnight, there was more activity around the plane, and it appeared that all the deportees were on board as the coaches left the terminal compound empty and parked up outside. (The next day, Unity tells me that two people were taken off the flight at the last minute, but those people estimated that around 80 Nigerians and Ghanaians were on board, including Isa Muaza, who was taken straight to hospital on arrival in Lagos, and a woman who married a British citizen two years ago, and was not expected to be deported).

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You can watch flights taking off from the far side of the airport, from a muddy lane alongside the north end of the runway. On the way over to it, I was stopped by the Police, who had been told I had been seen around the private aviation area. They were happy that I was a ‘spotter’ looking for planes – and advised me to join Essex Police’s Plane Watch scheme – but also warned me that the private aviation section was a restricted area, and I shouldn’t go there.

At 00:27, the Titan Airways 767 roared down the Stansted runway and into the night. Moments before, its call-sign appeared on Flightradar: AWC48A. And from there, an aircraft registration number: G-POWD.

We can see G-POWD on approach to Lagos a little after 6am. Two hours later, it’s on the move again, making the hop westwards from Lagos to Accra, the capital of Ghana, where it makes another stop. And then at 11am it appears to lift off back in the direction of London – at time of writing, it is probably somewhere over North Africa.

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When I got back to my car around 1, I had a flat battery, and had to wait for a repair man. When he arrived, and I explained what I was doing in this godforsaken place, he told me he’d been at the Inflite Terminal recently too, to jump-start a brand-new Tascor transporter van, whose driver told him these flights happen all the time, and nobody knows about it, not even most of the people who work at the airport. “Makes you think,” he said. “Makes you think.”

*

Photos are available at Flickr

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18 December 2013, 12:19 pm e89e215eac93545ed6af598bc198fd46
<![CDATA[Recent Work, November 2013: Render Ghosts, GPS, Landsat.]]> Found: call

render-desert

For some time, I have been threatening to write about the Render Ghosts. I was asked to contribute something to Electronic Voice Phenomena, an online literature and art project by Mercy and Penned in the Margins, and so I wrote about my recent trip to New Mexico, in search of the Render Ghosts:

I first noticed the Render Ghosts on the hoardings surrounding a new development near Finsbury Square. On the balconies of some vast, virtual tower, two pixelated figures looked out over a darkened London, a perfect red-pink gradient sunset behind them. He had short dark hair and stubble, wore a black jacket and blue jeans. She had a cropped red bob, white jacket, and a purple knee-length skirt. I didn’t know who they were, but I started seeing them everywhere.

Read the full piece over at EVP.

I also have a short essay and illustrations in the wonderful new Visual Editions‘ book of writing and maps, Where You Are, which also includes contributions from Joe Dunthorne, Geoff Dyer, Olafur Eliasson, Sheila Heti, and more.

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To ask “Where You Are” invites a series of responses: cartographic, historical, social, spiritual, situational; discursive or prescriptive. The GPS system is a monumental network that provides a permanent “You Are Here” sign hanging in the sky, its signal a constant, synchronised timecode. It suggests the possibility that one may never need be lost again; that future generations will grow up not knowing what it means to be truly lost.

The book is available to order now, but you can read the essay, and see the illustrations (much beautified by the designers at Bibliothèque), alongside all the other contributions on the Where You Are website.

The astute among you might notice a strong similarity between the diagrams in Where You Are and the piece I made for Container some months back:

gps-container

This 3D-printed object is the same thing under discussion in Where You Are:

This is a model of the Global Positioning System (GPS), a constellation of 24 satellites, in six orbital groups of four satellites, each orbital plane at 55 degrees inclination, and 60 degrees right ascension to its neighbour, 20,200 kilometres above the surface of the earth; a machine we are all living inside.

I’d had the original model sitting on my desk for some time before Tim asked me for a contribution to Container. In trying to draw and understand the GPS system as an abstract machine, I’d modelled the constellation in Sketchup – it was a natural step to flip-flop this nest of intersecting cones of influence back into the physical realm again, so that I could roll it between my fingers, as Einar and I did with airfix models of the drones, before the shadows (Einar’s own thinking about GPS, with Timo and Jørn, led to the Satellite Lamps project.) I call this the “Close Encounters” method.

landsat

A while back, I started the Laaaaaaandsat tumblr, which automatically posts, several times a day, every image released by the USGS Landsat observation programme – an ongoing, comprehensive survey of the planet by another satellite, 700km above the earth’s surface.

The endless stream of off-kilter images – reoriented so North is ‘up’ – remains a endless source of pleasure. So when Aperture magazine asked for 200 words on “What Matters Now” in photography, I thought of this little robot cameraman in the sky. 200 words is not enough, but it’s in the new issue.

NASA’s Landsat is the longest-running program dedicated to photographing the Earth from space, and has created millions of images since its inception in 1969. The first satellite, Landsat 1, was launched on July 23, 1972, atop a Delta 900 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Its mission was to photograph the whole Earth using three cameras which see both visible light and the near-infrared, and a four-channel multispectral scanner. The scanner was the project’s greatest innovation as it reveals hidden details about the planet’s surface, producing data and imagery used for everything from disaster relief, to agriculture, to studying climate change.

In February of this year, the program continued with the launch of Landsat 8. This incarnation features a more powerful scanner which sees in the ultraviolet; the panchromatic; the shortwave, near-, and thermal-infrared; revealing the presence of dust and smoke, of chlorophyll, of sub-surface rock formations, and the shape of clouds. The satellite captures four hundred images every day, creating a complete picture of the planet every sixteen days. Every one of these images is in the public domain, allowing every one of us to use, benefit from, and marvel at this ever-growing, ever-changing automated portrait of our planet.

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15 November 2013, 8:55 am 8b6908130db927b884e2c503ebf340d0
<![CDATA[#OccupyTheCloud]]> Found: call

“Occupy the Cloud”, an installation for Open Heart Surgery, The Moving Museum, 180 Strand, October – December 2013.

Occupy-Long

“Occupy the Cloud” is an installation of three banners on the facade of 180 Strand, a brutalist office block on a main road in central London. The banners are made of pixelated, virtual skies taken from architectural renderings, like those which adorn nearby building sites. They feature three symbols: the lightning bolt through a circle of the international squatters’ movement; the @-symbol used to denote digital location or direction (and acquired in 2010 by MoMA); and the Cloud symbol, which has come to stand for the vast and remote data storage and processing capabilities of corporations and governments. (I have previously made the assertion, both humorously and more directly that the Cloud is a lie.) The banners themselves occupy an uneasy position between corporate branding, and protest.

When I was asked to contribute to the Moving Museum’s London show, I initially intended to make work based on my ongoing Render Ghosts project, which examines the effects of software designs and processes on society and the built environment (I’ve previously written about this for Domus). One plan was to create flags for the Render Ghosts, who are the people who appear in architectural visualisations, to mark their occupation of that liminal space between the real and the virtual, the physical and the digital, the present and the future.

A couple of things focussed the work. The first was a site visit to 180 Strand, a vast and currently empty building in central London, surrounded by major streets, and major developments (the next site on the street, surrounded by hoardings, boasts “a luxurious new development of stunning apartments and penthouses”). The second was my experience of censorship in Australia last month. I realised it would be possible to make a very public work; and there was no point in being subtle.

Occupy-Banners

In the last few months we’ve learned much about the extent to which supposedly secure “cloud” services have been infiltrated by our security services without oversight or consent. The latest revelations detail explicitly how data passed between Google and Yahoo servers is directly intercepted. But anyone who saw the hundreds of metal barriers which were used to fill Paternoster Square by its corporate owners in February 2012 to prevent peaceful protestors approaching the London Stock Exchange is unlikely to assume that we can trust corporations to act in our best interests any more than governments. Indeed, some of them are starting to act like governments, and no less opaquely than the traditional nation-states.

At the same time, the UK government’s primary response to rising house prices and rental costs, a lack of affordable housing, local councils moving residents out of the city, and a steep rise in homelessness, has been to criminalise squatting, a practice which has a long and radical tradition in this country.

The Levellers and the Diggers of the 17th Century occupied public lands and cultivated them for the public benefit – the state and the landowners conspired to imprison and execute them. It was a young Leveller, John Lilburne, whose false imprisonment and torture lead directly to the establishment of the principle of human rights in English law, and the founding documents which became the US Constitution and Bill of Rights. It is those same rights and laws which have been so violently abused over the last decade to permit exactly the same tortures and renditions which Lilburne was subjected to. The brutal reactions to peaceful public protest in the UK, from Occupy to anti-war marches and the student protests, reveal the illusion of “public” space once again.

As I write this, the UK government is debating its own oversight of the intelligence and security services. The MP Tom Watson, as well as linking the abuse of secrecy powers to the CIA’s drone assassination programme, just made the assertion that “An individual’s data is like their vote: individually minor, privately performed, and hugely powerful when aggregated. We should no more tamper with an individual’s data than tamper with their vote.” In my essay earlier this Summer for Matter magazine, Ring of Steel, I attempted to show how our technological systems tend towards secrecy, and are complicit in abuses of state power, and blanket, undemocratic surveillance. In his essay Turnkey Tyranny, Surveillance and the Terror State, Trevor Paglen states that “[b]y exposing NSA programs like PRISM and Boundless Informant, Edward Snowden has revealed that we are not moving toward a surveillance state: we live in the heart of one.” Paglen asserts that networked technologies as they are employed now do “not merely provide the capacity for “turnkey tyranny”—they render any other future all but impossible.” Powerful organisations which are cavalier with democratic rights are also cavalier with personal data and privacy: the two are linked, directly.

The depredations of corporations and governments on the internet reveal that it, too, is only a potential commons: not a zone of freedom, but one of conflict and power. We have re-discovered the efficacy of spatial protest: we can take the banks to protest unjust tax arrangements, but can we occupy the datacentres over the same issues?

It’s hard to shift these debates from the physical sphere to the digital and back again, to make the necessary connections. But as a friend pointed out about the online harassment debate in the UK, the only way to make sense of it was to remove the prefix “online”, and the issue becomes much clearer. In order to act fully and democratically in the world, we need to recognise that that world does not end at the screen, that the shadowy infrastructure of the network and the cloud is both a political territory and as viable and vital a platform for activism and action as the piazza and the high street. We need to fully account for the imbalances in power produced by the shifting of vast computing resources offboard, offshore, and out of sight.

The entreaty to “Occupy the Cloud” is a call to link these spheres of action, to recognise the central role that technology plays in shaping, producing, and sustaining contemporary politics; and to develop the tactics for action and the frameworks for understanding which will allow us to intervene for a more democratic future.

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More pictures at Flickr.

Purchase an “Occupy the Cloud” t-shirt. 30% of profits will be donated to Shelter.

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31 October 2013, 12:06 pm 6fd0098c88ba4e8e6bcbd73e433df0d6
<![CDATA[Australia: Drone Shadows, Diagrams, and Political Systems]]> Found: calls, call

slq-drone

This week I was due to install another Drone Shadow, this one in Brisbane, Australia (that’s a planning mock-up, above). I had been invited by the Brisbane Writers Festival, and we had received permission from the Queensland State Library to install the work on their premises. Unfortunately, due to the actions of Arts Queensland, the department of the State Government with overall responsibility for the arts, it has been impossible to proceed with the work. The actions of Arts Queensland in this case have been both incredibly frustrating and boringly familiar: they have stalled, dissembled, obfuscated and lied, all in the service of silencing an artistic work and preventing a proper debate occurring, either about the work, or the government’s censorship of it. (For the record, there is a full account of my dealings with Arts Queensland available here.)

I’ve often been asked if I have got into any kind of trouble for creating the Drone Shadows before, and the answer has always been no. This is despite the fact that we have drawn them in Istanbul, during a period when the Turkish government was in negotiation to purchase Predator drones from the US, and in Washington DC – right next to the White House – at the height of the US drone war. But apparently the image – the bare outline – of a drone was too much for the government of Queensland.

In Istanbul we drew a Predator, in DC a Reaper. In Brisbane I proposed to draw a Global Hawk, the largest military unmanned aircraft currently in service. Late last year it was revealed that the United States flew secret Global Hawk spy missions from Air Force bases in Australia in 2001-2006. The programme was revealed by a group of amateur aviation historians who tracked the Global Hawks arriving and taking off. When they revealed details of the flights, they were visited by Australian defence security officials who demanded they not reveal details of the flights. An Australian senator who proposed to notify the public of the flights was silenced by the US Air Force, which demanded the flights remain classified.

Since then, Australia has been in prolonged negotiations with the US to purchase Global Hawks itself, announcing an AU$1 billion programme in 2004, rising to AU$3 billion in 2012. The latest election, which takes place quite coincidentally this Saturday, has led to further fierce debates over Australian defence and the drone program.

Australia’s domestic drone program is primarily aimed at “securing borders”, and its preference for maritime versions of the Global Hawk is due to the need for surveillance of immigration by sea. This program aims to ensure, in the words of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd in July 2013, that “any asylum seeker who arrives in Australia by boat will have no chance of being settled in Australia as refugees”, by shifting the problem to neighbouring countries such as Papua New Guinea. There is also a long history of asylum claimants being housed at former Air Force bases – and a long history of government objection to artworks dealing with the subject: see for example the story of Escape from Woomera, a political computer game about a detention camp in a remote Australian Defence Force base in South Australia.

One of the many reasons given by Arts Queensland for their opposition to the installation of the Drone Shadow was the opening at the Queensland Museum next door of an exhibition of thousands-year-old artefacts from Afghanistan, to which members of the local Afghan community had been invited. Arts Queensland expressed their view (after several weeks of denying any such issue) that this community might be made uncomfortable by the work. The community was never consulted, and the Museum itself raised no objection. Arts Queensland called it a “raw issue”. Indeed it is.

Australia’s Defence Forces have been involved in the war in Afghanistan since 2001. This contribution has included ships, manned aircraft, ground troops – and, more recently, drones.

The Royal Australian Air Force has been using drones in Afghanistan since 2009, when it first started to deploy the Israeli-built Heron drone, a twin-hulled surveillance drone the size of a light aircraft. At a 2012 promotional event on Australia’s Gold Coast, a short drive from Brisbane, Australia’s most senior military drone commander stated that the drone program was “like crack cocaine, a drug, for our guys involved – [they] just can’t get enough of it.”

woomera

These drones are in fact still owned by the Israeli manufacturer, and leased via a Canadian company – as Australia’s ABC News put it: “Israeli-owned drones, leased by Canadians, flown by Australians, fighting a war against Islamist insurgents in Afghanistan”. The RAAF drone teams are trained by Canadian and Israeli civilians at Amberley in Queensland, on the outskirts of Brisbane. Before they deploy to the field, they spend hours test-flying the drones over a simulated Afghan village, constructed in 2011, on the Woomera test range, close by the notorious refugee detention centre. (Picture above: a Heron drone parked at Woomera Air Base, South Australia, via Google Earth.)

The RAAF’s Herons are nominally unarmed, but they are equipped with lasers which allow them to mark targets for incoming airstrikes or artillery – the networking of contemporary military forces means that the formal distinctions between the capabilities of different weapons systems are increasingly meaningless. The drones are a key part of the “kill chain”, the process by which targets are selected and attacked by the entire system, and the ADF also calls on US and British armed Reaper drones to support its ground troops in battle.

In describing the contours of Australia’s relationship with drones, we see how, once again, such relationships extend beyond the individual aircraft to encompass far wider issues including domestic politics, international relations, warfare, immigration and networked technologies.

Drones are avatars of the the political process: they are instantiations of a set of ideologies and beliefs, made visible by their reification in electromechanical systems. When we talk about drones, we are really talking about the politics that demand, shape, and deploy them, and the politics which are made possible by them. This politics reflects the drones themselves: it is a politics of violence, of obfuscation, of radical inequality of sight and action, and it is sustained by that obfuscation and that inequality.

No wonder then that politicians are afraid of even artistic representations of the drone. No wonder they cite feelings of “discomfort” at even mentioning them, although in projecting this discomfort onto an immigrant population – without consultation – they reveal even more clearly the complicity of the technology in war and social oppression.

The Drone Shadow is not just a picture of a drone. It is a diagram of a political system. Every time we draw one, we use it to cast light on the actors who would prefer that the reality of their intentions and actions remain hidden.

This is the nature of networked technology today: it is the product of an embedded politics which it simultaneously obscures, through its apparent sophistication, and renders startlingly visible, through its explicit form. That invisibility is the intention of power; rendering it visible is the intention of art.

In the present case, power in all its petty exercise has done its utmost to render such a debate invisible. That it has succeeded for the moment, with the barest minimum of opposition from the cultural institutions which should oppose such exercises at every step, is saddening. It is also, I have to believe, unlikely and impossible to remain the case for long.

*

If you would like to draw your own Global Hawk shadow, you can download a schematic for the installation here.

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5 September 2013, 9:03 pm 1f30a7ddd1481c51a55c7af95cee03d2
<![CDATA[Test Match Special and Technological Agency]]> Found: calls, call

“The problem with the introduction of technology is the expectation of 100% accuracy” – Jonathan Agnew, Test Match Special

Hawk-Eye

When Aleem Dar, one of two umpires at Trent Bridge last Sunday, raised his finger to dismiss Australia’s Brad Haddin and give the first Test to England, he was playing a crucial role not only in the 131 year history of the Ashes contest, but in a far older, and contemporarily relevant debate: that of human versus technological agency. It’s a strange thing when you realise that the most prominent discussion about the future of humanity in a technological age is happening during the lunch break on Radio Four Long Wave – but it is.

For those not familiar with international cricket’s Umpire Decision Review System (DRS), it is the process by which certain matters are decided on the field, not just by the umpires, but by a series of advanced technologies observing the game: watching, analysing, and even listening to it. Haddin was initially given not out when he appeared to be caught behind, presumably because the umpire didn’t believe he had hit the ball. But after England appealed the decision, the decision was referred to the third umpire, and DRS. A slow-motion infra-red camera known as Hot Spot, trained on the batsman from the far side of the field, showed a momentary but incontrovertibly bright dot of friction heat on Haddin’s bat as he just nicked the ball into the England wicket-keeper’s hands. Another system, not officially part of DRS but widely used by broadcasters, confirmed the decision. The Snickometer, a combination of slow-motion camera and high-quality microphone, detected an almost imperceptible but audible “snick” as the ball struck the bat’s edge. The game was England’s.

HotSpot

Hot Spot’s technology was adapted by an Australian broadcasting company for sporting use, but is based on pioneering military work by French scientist Nicholas Bion for tank and jet fighter tracking. The twin SLX-Hawk thermal imaging cameras at Trent Bridge were built by a British engineering company, Selex ES, which also designs laser rangefinders, radars and other sensors for planes, warships and satellites. The Snickometer was invented in the mid-90s by British Computer Scientist Alan Plaskett, who has also worked on Hot Spot. The final piece of DRS, and the best known one due to its use in Tennis and other sports, is Hawk-Eye, another product of British engineering – Roke Manor Research, based in Romsey, which also produces signal intercept systems and altimeters for drone aircraft.

Hawk-Eye uses a network of high-performance cameras to track a ball in motion, combining the footage from each one in order to create a three-dimensional representation of the ball’s trajectory. In tennis, this yields the footprints which decide whether a line call is given in or out in contested calls, and in cricket it is used to predict whether a ball deflecting by the batsman’s pad would have hit the wicket, or not. But of course, this is only a prediction, more accurate than a human eye and capable of greater accuracy than human judges, but not, in any strict sense, infallible. The complexity of the calculations used to determe Hawk-Eye’s accuracy rival those of the more famous, and equally misunderstood, Duckworth-Lewis method.

The significance of such technologies has not gone unnoticed, and as such is highly debated within the sport, and particularly in the commentary box. Listeners to Test Match Special have become accustomed to long and involved discussions about these technologies (and others – Friday lunchtime was given over to an explanation of the work of the English Cricket Board’s Performance Analysis Team, which tracks, stores and analyses every ball in every first-class game in order to provide as much preemptive training to its players as possible. This is truly ‘big data’ in action). Sometimes these debates concern the inner workings of the technology, and at other times they become more philosophical, focussed on the greater question of what is, and what is not, cricket.

And this is where sports technology begins to illuminate larger issues around human and technological agency. An unlikely champion of humanity has emerged in the person of Sepp Blatter, President of FIFA. Soccer players and fans have long called for the introduction of goal-line technology, which would be able to tell more accurately than referees if a ball had indeed crossed the line. A number of different approaches, one based on Hawk-Eye, another using chips implanted in footballs, are currently under trial. However, Blatter has long opposed these, based partly on their accuracy, but also going on the record to say that “Other sports regularly change the laws of the game to react to the new technology. … We don’t do it and this makes the fascination and the popularity of football”. What underlies this statement is a fundamental belief that sport is a human undertaking, with all the confusion, fallibility and debate that that involves. One reading is that officials are themselves part of the game, a fact of endless frustration to almost everyone involved; another that sport is inherently chance-based, and while we resist optimising participants through drugs and physical augmentations, the laws and outcomes of sport should remain human too.

Like sport itself, these debates are endless. No technology will ever be infallible, but it may certainly be more accurate than human referees, umpires, commentators and armchair critics. What’s really interesting about having this debate at the TMS level is that it’s fundamentally and visibly embedded in a larger system: that of the game and history of cricket, a rule-based structure which leaves plenty of wiggle room for human fallibility, and human passions. This means the debate is not about the technology itself, but about its wider implications for the system it’s embedded in. The graphics are pretty but we care about the outcome a lot more.

But when such debates happen in wider society – another rule-based structure with a degree of wiggle room – this isn’t always the case. The same arguments around human and technological agency are occurring all around us, but we don’t seem to be debating them in the same way. Whether this is automation and optimisation in factories and supply chains and the rise of cloud labour; the use of high-frequency, algorithmic trading programmes in stock exchanges; drone strikes and other forms of roboticised, augmented warfare; or the ubiquitous, computational surveillance of the kind performed by Google, GCHQ and the NSA; all of these debates revolve around issues of human agency and the limits of automated systems. Each of these systems is built by humans, but their motives and politics are obscured by the illegibility and authority of the technology itself; in each of the surrounding debates both the technologies and their consequences are harder to see, meaning it’s harder to have an informed debate about them. As a result, truly democratic participation in the real business of the world is ever more reduced.

What is important is that a debate happens around these technologies in terms that everyone can understand, uncomplicated by technical jargon and technological determinism. Sport, rich in emotion and visualisation, is a perfect testing ground for such arguments. That they are being advanced most prominently between overs on Test Match Special is both delightful and worthy of wider attention.

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18 July 2013, 8:15 am 67ba06e049e9079e33d5467a6a3c4f5d
<![CDATA[Oscar Diaz “Hermès-scope”]]> Found: call

poster for Oscar Diaz “Hermès-scope”
Oscar Diaz “Hermès-scope”
at Maison Hermès (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-03-19 - 2014-05-06)

The tiny colorful objects of a kaleidoscope twinkle brilliantly, as if very precious. The seemingly endless figures that appear at the end of the kaleidoscope’s darkness take on strange and enchanting forms. Surely you can remember gazing at the continuously changing images? Like a kaleidoscope, the Hermès scarf “Kare” also forms its own kind of microcosm, interweaving an infinite-seeming number of patterns. Inspired by the “Kare” scarf, designer Oscar Diaz has created a kaleidoscope display for the front window of Maison Hermès. Diaz was drawn to the kaleidoscope because of its relationship to science and nature and the world of geometric patterns it creates. The symmetries produced in kaleidoscopes also govern nature’s processes of evolution, and these symmetries found in plants and animals call to mind the budding of spring and the ongoing metamorphoses of the biological world. When you look in the kaleidoscopes of the Maison Hermès display, what you see unfolding before your eyes is an unending series of geometric forms. Taking a step back, you’ll notice symbols painted on the window, inviting passersby to come have a look. The Maison Hermès window presents an eternal metamorphosis of unfurling colors and shapes realized through mathematical thinking and precise calculation and experimentation. In the background, Hermès products revolve on wheels. Drawing near and looking into a kaleidoscope reveals endless world of symmetries. Joining in the kaleidoscope’s macro and microcosmic worlds, the products of Hermès continue to evolve into new forms. [Image: © Satoshi Asakawa / Courtesy of Hermès Japon]

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<![CDATA[Tets Ohnari “Tets Ohnari ∞ Egon Schiele”]]> Found: award

poster for Tets Ohnari “Tets Ohnari ∞ Egon Schiele”
Tets Ohnari “Tets Ohnari ∞ Egon Schiele”
at Dai-ichi Life Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-04-07 - 2014-05-07)

Winner of the VOCA 2012 award Tets Ohnari, currently based in Eastern Europe presents a solo exhibition of 3 chairs. The first chair was made by the artist Egon Schiele around 100 years ago and used during his artistic production. The second is a replica of the first created by Ohnari himself. Finally the third is a replica formed from the woodchips created in the process of making the second chair. These three chairs consolidate three sets of values, that of history, function and aesthetic, all within the same shape. [Image: Tets Ohnari “Chairs” 56×81×44cm]

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<![CDATA[“Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi 2014”]]> Found: award, jury

poster for “Art <U>Award</U> Tokyo Marunouchi 2014”
“Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi 2014”
at Gyoko-dori Underground Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-04-26 - 2014-05-25)

The “Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi” (hereafter “a.a.t.m.”) is an exhibition of contemporary art which aims to discover and nurture new talent. Besides opening up careers of young artists, the “a.a.t.m.”, held at the Gyoko-dori Underground Gallery, which is directly linked to Tokyo Station and located between the Marunouchi Building and Shin Marunouchi Building, provides even wider encounters with art and encourages artists to achieve their full potential. With a total of 275 artists having been featured in the seven exhibitions held to date, many of these creators have taken this platform as a stepping stone from which to launch their careers nationally and internationally and this year brings a whole new line up placing a spotlight on the cutting edge artists of the next generation. [Related Events] Public Jury Review(open to the public) Date: 4/26(Sat) 10:30- Venue: Gyoko-dori Underground Gallery a.a.t.m Talk Date: 5/10(Sat) Venue: Marunouchi Cafe Seek For further information please refer to the official website.

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<![CDATA[SICF15: Spiral Independent Creators Festival 15]]> Found: awarded, award, jury

poster for SICF15: Spiral Independent Creators Festival 15
SICF15: Spiral Independent Creators Festival 15
at Spiral (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2014-05-03 - 2014-05-06)

This year golden week is set yet again to welcome a flood of over 100 creators upon Spiral Hall as part of the Spiral Independent Creators Festival (SICF). With a tide of unique creativity pouring across the numerous booths and grand prizes awarded by jury panel and audience votes, this show searches out the leading artists and designers of the future. Schedule A 3rd May (Sat)- 4th May (Sun) 11:00-19:00 B 5th May (Mon)- 6th May (Tues) 11:00-19:00 Venue: Spiral Hall (Spiral 3F)

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<![CDATA[Seattle Artist Ulrich Pakker Receives UNESCO Art Award]]> Found: award

We’d like to congratulate Ulrich Pakker for being selected to receive the UNESCO art award for "Inspiring Peace and Humanity Through Art and Science". Ulrich is also a premier gallery member of SeattleArtists.com.

"I am honored to be receiving this UNESCO art award from Dr. Sheree Wen, U.S. National Commissioner for UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization).  It has been a great year and this is certainly the crowning glory." says Ulrich Pakker.

If you’d like any more information on the UNESCO award or on what Ulrich has been working on lately, please visit http://www.RPArt.com.

Seattle Artist Ulrich Pakker receives UNESCO art award

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8 October 2013, 3:39 pm 4ea58d95e29d6589eb44d448a6aff0f8
<![CDATA[TTTOW - A unique film festival]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline
TTTOW or Taxi Takes on The World is a unique film festival where anyone across the world can participate. All you need is a camcorder (a smartphone will do!), a taxi ride and the ensuing conversation with the taxi driver - recorded and sent to the organizers. 




Yes, its as simple as that. But what exactly is this film festival about? 

The Taxi Takes on the World is a crowd sourced interactive documentary about conversations between drivers and passengers from inside taxis all around the globe. This user generated project aims to harness honest grassroots interactions and present the world’s ‘video takes’ on matters that affect us all. 


“Talks inside taxis are usually between people of diverse backgrounds and so offer a variety of perspectives. These ‘takes’ have the power to blur boundaries and bridge cultures. The Taxi Takes on the World will showcase crowd sourced video stories that mainstream media ignores about times when people find common ground and break stereotypes about the ‘other’. Mobile technology allows a democratization of media which aligns with my work’s vision for how new media will shape our future. This film festival will be part of a traveling film festival and offers a great opportunity to showcase citizens’ stories of brotherhood” - Vandana Sood - Giddings, Creator, Founder, Executive Director.

Date & Venues


The film festival will be held from The 21ST of September 2013 to the 2nd of October 2013 in Jammu and Kashmir, New Delhi, Punjab and Manipur. Kashmir and Manipur are both conflict states of India. 

This film festival is a partnership between The Taxi Takes on the World project and Standing Together to Enable Peace, Trust (STEP) a non-profit organization established in New Delhi in 2009.

Themes


The film festival will focus on certain broad themes:

  • Religious and ethnic conflict
  • War and terror
  • Race
  • Gender
  • Class
  • Culture

Each of these broad global topics has regional nuances that the mainstream media often overlooks. Through the prism of the taxi, where every day people from often widely disparate backgrounds meet, this film festival will tell a story about how, given the right space, we all can understand each other and speak a common language.

Where & How to

Need guidance on how to go about it? Check out this short prezi that suggests the kind of questions you can ask to begin a conversation and start your take. Find the application procedure, rules & regulations all on the TTOW submissions page.

Hurry, the submissions deadline is September 10, 2013!

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22 August 2013, 2:40 pm d0adb23994c64fad4eae2c21551a7229
<![CDATA[Should Architects Design for Solitary Confinement?]]> Found: calls, call

Raphael Sperry calls on architects to ban the design of cells for solitary confinement? Terry Karges explains why the Petersen Automotive Museum is changing gear.

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20 August 2013, 4:24 pm 8c2a491f52f35ffd88809c4fb19076ad
<![CDATA[City of Seattle "Art Interruptions", Temporary installations in Beacon Hill & Central Waterfront]]> Found: opportunity

Find ‘Art Interruptions’ in Beacon Hill and the Central Waterfront

Artworks on street and park infrastructure, furniture and trees bring surprise and humor, On view through Sept. 20

1Temporary artworks eliciting moments of surprise, beauty and humor are dotted through Beacon Hill and the Central Waterfront via the Art Interruptions series produced by the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture.  The artworks, intended to last for approximately six weeks, appear on city sidewalks and in parks offering a brief interruption in viewers’ days. Twelve artists have created temporary installations, most of which are on view through Sept. 20, though dates vary depending on the type of artwork. Projects range from a light-hearted photo cutout to traditional rangoli and flower mandalas made by local Indian artists in the Beacon Hill neighborhood and faux discarded banana peels to patterned handrails on the Waterfront.
The Art Interruptions program was launched in 2012 with a dozen projects spread between Greenwood Avenue North, and the Central Waterfront. The 2013 series complements a number of temporary projects produced by the City’s art department this summer including a visual art installation and interactive camera obscura project at Westlake Park and the ‘Alaskan Way Viaduct Observation and Demolition Unit‘ by Dane Youngren, which closes this weekend.

Administered in partnership with Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) and Seattle Parks and Recreation, Art Interruptions is funded with SDOT 1% for Art funds and administered by the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture.

Beacon Hill Projects Beginning at Daejeon Park, heading south on 18th Avenue South, and ending at 12th Avenue South and Lucille Street.

2Elizabeth Gahan

Elizabeth Gahan’s site-specific installation Climbing Crystals uses recycled corrugated plastic political signs to create an unexpected synthetic growth interrupting the serene Maplewood Park and surrounding residential neighborhood. Signs from the 2012 election season are re-envisioned and reconstructed into a cluster of hollow 3D, crystal-like forms that appear to emerge from the ground and climb the tree trunk.

Brian Gerich and Ian Horton

Brian Gerich and Ian Horton’s Blind Drift both contrasts and mimics environmental elements in the hillside at 18th Avenue South and South Walker Street, and creates a gradient effect across the pedestrian path of the site. The artists worked closely with Steven Chavez as a consultant on the project.

3Julia Haack

Julia Haack’s Arboreal Amulets is a grouping of sculptural constructions attached to a tree cluster at Daejeon Park, adjacent to the bike path and Sturgus Way South and just northwest of the Korean pavilion. The artwork is made from reclaimed lumber and latex paint and employs geometric, colorful patterns with cascading shapes.

Joanne Lepore and Breanne Gearheart

Joanne Lepore and Breanne Gearheart’s Portals uses stripped bicycle rims as way-finding and point-of-interest markers along the Beacon Hill Greenway. The rims are attached to trees, existing signage and in sculptural formations in right-of-way areas. These place markers not only indicate to cyclists that they are on the right path, but draw attention to the peculiarities of the environs. The artists chose the sites that were shifts in the bike path, opportunities to explore the Greenway and the Beacon Hill environs, or to demonstrate creative uses of rights-of-way and public land with a gardening/sustainability focus. A map with details, context, and links can be found online at http://tenaciousinstinct.com/projects/art-interruptions/.

Tour: The artists will also lead a bike tour of the Greenway route and all Art Interruptions artwork installations on the path, 4 to 6 p.m., Aug. 18. Bicyclists should meet at the I-90 bike trail to start the tour, which will end in Georgetown. Bring helmets and water.

Chris Papa

Take advantage of a light-hearted photo opportunity with Chris Papa’s Free Pile, a life-size, carnival photo cut-out. Equal parts painting and sculpture, the wood assembly draws attention to the “junk” we put out on our sidewalk that other people then proudly claim as their own. The photo cut-out is at the corner of Beacon Avenue South and Hanford Street, just outside Hello Bicycle.

Photos: Share photos of the cut-out on the Office of Arts & Culture’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/SeattleArts. Use hashtag #ArtInterruptions and #ChrisPapa.

Annie Penta

Annie Penta’s Visual Blessings: Women’s Art of India employs several local Indian rangoli artists to create South Indian Tamil Nadu chalk designs in various right-of-way locations twice weekly during early morning hours. Artists will also create intermittent athapoovidal (elaborate ground decorations) mandalas made from local flowers, plants and organic materials.

Rangoli chalk installation schedule:

  • Thursday, Aug. 8: southwest corner of 18th Avenue South and South State Street.
  • Sunday, Aug. 11: 18th Avenue South and South Plum Street.
  • Thursday, Aug. 15: Four corners of intersection at 18th Avenue South and South Hill Street.
  • Sunday, Aug. 18: Four corners of intersection at 18th Avenue South and South College Street, intersection of 18th Avenue South and South Bayview Street.
  • Thursday, Aug. 22: Southwest corner of 18th Avenue South and South Waite Street.
  • Sunday, Aug. 25: NE corner of 18th Avenue South and South McClellan Street and if time allows, at the intersection of 18th Avenue South and South Lander Street.
  • Thursday, Aug. 29: In collaboration with artist Raji Raman, at the intersection of Beacon Avenue South and South Hanford Street.
  • Sunday, Sept. 1: In collaboration with artist Raji Raman, at the intersection of 18th Avenue South and South Stevens Street.
  • Thursday, Sept. 5: At the intersection of South Hinds Street and Lafayette Avenue South. If time allows, at South Horton and Lafayette Avenue South.
  • Sunday, Sept. 8: On north and south side of Spokane Street at Lafayette Avenue South.
  • Thursday, Sept. 12: In collaboration with artist Rita Biswas, at the intersection of South Hanford Street and Lafayette Avenue South.
  • Sunday, Sept. 18: In collaboration with artist Rita Biswas at the intersection of 16th Avenue South and South Dakota Street.

Flower mandala installation

  • Saturday, Aug. 10: On the north-facing hill of Jefferson Park at Lafayette Avenue South and Spokane Street.
  • Saturday, Aug. 24: In collaboration with artist Anantha Ahluwalia, on the southeast hill of Jefferson Park at 16th Avenue South and South Spokane Street. If it is windy, artists will relocate to intersection of Lafayette Avenue South and Spokane Street.
  • Saturday, Sept. 7: In collaboration with artist Anita Bhatt, on the north side of Jefferson Park at 17th Avenue South and Lafayette Avenue South. If it is windy, artists will relocate to at Lafayette Avenue South and Spokane Street.

Hollis Wong-Wear

Hollis Wong-Wear’s Neighborhood Boombox features recordings by Beacon Hill musicians, poets and performing artists of various disciplines that have been curated by Wong-Wear. Inspired visually by the boombox carried by Radio Raheem in the film Do the Right Thing, the presentation and placement of this installation will occur at several locations where local businesses will act as stewards of the mobile installation. The boombox will be outside during normal business hours for the hosting establishments. The first site for the boombox will be at The Station Café through Aug. 18. It will move to El Quetzal on Aug. 19. Recordings will be on cassette tapes as a playful throwback to a virtually obsolete technology. The music will be archived as several volumes in .mp3 format and can be accessed online after the project is complete. Follow the Office of Arts & Culture on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SeattleArts to learn more about the boombox whereabouts.

Central Waterfront Projects (On Alaskan Way between Piers 62/63 and Marion Street Ferry Terminal walkway, including the Pike Street Hill Climb)>

4Christian French

Christian French’s Sightings is a series of photographs chronicling the travels of an old weather-beaten hubcap that looks like a UFO (or is it a UFO that looks like a hubcap?). Presented at the spot where each photograph was taken (Waterfront Park and Pier 62/63), the photographs echo scenic views or commentary on the landscape. Viewers have an opportunity to look back in time, seeing both the landscape in front of them as well as a vision of something now past, in this exercise in the overlay of humor and memory.

Jesse Link

Jesse Link’s Vertical Ascension is a free-standing sculpture comprised of four, large rectangular boxes stacked one on top of the other, reaching eight feet high. Each side has a painting on it depicting a sperm whale, a colossal squid, tall trees and a large wave raising a ship into the air. The sculpture will be at the base of the Pike Street Hillclimb.

5Tim Marsden

Tim Marsden’s approach to art is to engage the public and create an awareness of our surroundings. In Clutter, he’s created everyday objects (i.e. unwanted newspapers, discarded banana peels, bricks and pallets) in a stylized fashion made from wood, metal, bricks and mixed media. Marsden’s art is placed in inconspicuous sites provoking double-takes and laughs from passers-by. Locations include the bike path on Alaskan Way and crossing the road at Pike Street and Union Ave.

Michiko Tanaka

Michiko Tanaka’s Yellow is a series of posters and postcards with photographs, text and graphic symbols found in unexpected places. The materials include inspirational posters with common scientific theories (energy and mass are equivalent and transmutable), her Grandmother’s sayings (you always worry about the wrong things), and five-by-seven-inch post cards (choice > good choice > bad choice > no regrets). Artworks are scattered under the Alaskan Viaduct, on the Marion Street Terminal walkway, in Waterfront Park and on a variety of traffic signal boxes.

6Sam Trout

Sam Trout enjoys instigating the surprise of street art experiences. He will construct the installation Welcome…See you later using masking and vinyl tape in a geometric pattern along the handrail on the Marion Street Ferry Terminal Walkway (Marion Street between Alaskan Way and First Avenue). Trout chose blue and white colors to carry the nautical theme, and will employ assistants to learn from the art-making process.

Beacon Hill Photos: Laura Becker

Waterfront Photos: Juan Hernandez

Office of Arts & Culture | Making art work.

We envision a city driven by creativity that provides the opportunity for everyone to engage in diverse arts and cultural experiences. We are supported by the 16-member Seattle Arts Commission, citizen volunteers appointed by the mayor and City Council.

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13 August 2013, 3:08 pm def86c04666082f633cc2756c94997fc
<![CDATA[How Apple's new computers impact filmmaking]]> Found: calling, call

The new Macbook Pro and iMac announced by Apple on October 24 heralds a major shift in the way PCs will be designed and have a cumulative impact on digital filmmaking.



Below are some of the major upgrades that affect the digital filmmaking process:

1.    No Optical Drive: Both the new Macbook Pro with retina display and the new iMac have done away with the DVD drive, with Apple calling it  obsolete in the age of blazing broadband speeds when movies and television can be easily streamed online or downloaded. The new iMac does have 2 Thunderbolt ports and 4 USB 3.0 ports to allow connection of external hard drives and other devices. Seeing that Apple is usually the trendsetter in computer design, we can expect competitors like HP and Dell to follow suit. This could spell the death knell for the DVD industry, and moviemakers will now be looking to go completely digital. Of course, home theatre systems and bluray players will ensure that the home video market doesn’t completely evaporate in the near future, but the transition to a more 'online' movie watching experience is surely on its way.  

2.    Much better screen resolutions: The new iMac has a full HD display (1,920 × 1,080 pixels) for the 21.5” version and 2,560 × 1,440 pixel for the 27” version. It certainly translates into a better film/video watching experience and the computer being used for watching movies and gaming more than ever. The Macbook Pro with Retina display boats of a tantalizing 2,560 x 1,600 at 227 pixels per inch. This one has four times the screen resolution of the previous 13-inch version of the MacBook Pro.

3.    Super powerful processors: The new 21.5” iMac starts with a config of Intel Core i5 Quad Core 2.7 Ghz Processor with 8GB RAM , 1GB dedicated NVIDIA graphics and 1TB hard disk. Even the Macbook Pro with Retina display is all about performance, speed and graphics. It boasts of an Intel dual-core i5 Ivy Bridge processor clock at 2.5 Ghz (minimum) For graphics it has the Intel HD 4,000 graphics support. The RAM is 8 GB and its all-flash storage has three configurations available: 256 GB, 512 GB, or 768 GB. Such top-end configurations in the base models bode well for popular film editing applications like Final Cut Pro.  Apple will be looking to release an even more powerful version of its flagship video editing app to utilize the full potential of its new line of computer devices.

The rise of smartphones and tablets coupled with faster broadband speeds have already given a fillip to the various kinds of digital filmmaking, both in terms of production and post production.  Apple’s new line of smart computers will be prove to be another turning point, particularly because the optical drive has been dropped across its iMac and Macbook Pro ranges.

What do you think of Apple’s new devices, and their potential impact on filmmaking?

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26 October 2012, 1:04 pm 011880692e3f5039023c6a19fbf277a8
<![CDATA[George Clooney honoured at Palm Springs Film Festival]]> Found: awards, award

George Clooney will receive the Chairman's Award for his acting work in The Descendants and his directing of The Ides of March at the 2012 Palm Springs International Film Festival.

The award will be presented on January 7 at PSIFF's annual Awards Gala, a black-tie event that always hands out an array of awards to luminaries who figure to be in the Oscar race.

Like the awards given at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in late January, the Palm Springs event has become a valuable stop on the Oscar campaign trail. Previous recipients of the Chairman's Award include Dustin Hoffman, Nicole Kidman and Ben Affleck.

Oscar-nominated actress Michelle Williams will also be rewarded for her portrayal of Marilyn Monroe in “My Week With Marilyn,” which is already generating Oscar buzz.

Williams, 31, will receive the Desert Palm Achievement Actress Award at the Palm Springs International Film Festival awards gala at the Palm Springs Convention Center. Previous recipients include Academy Award winners Natalie Portman, Marion Cotillard, Charlize Theron and Kate Winslet.

“My Week With Marilyn,” which opens Wednesday in limited distribution, premiered Oct. 9 at the New York International Film Festival. Directed by Simon Curtis, the film was presented Nov. 6 as part of the AFI Fest at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, where Monroe put her hand and footprints in cement in 1952.

The Palm Springs International Film Festival runs Jan. 5-16 2012 at various venues in Palm Springs

Sources: mydesert.com & Reuters

Technorati Tags: ,

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23 November 2011, 9:20 am ac83454604d81558e40a5489757995b8
<![CDATA[Final Cut Pro X released]]> Found: calls, call
Apple has released Final Cut Pro X, the latest version of its professional video-editing software and one of the most popular programs for digital filmmaking.
Its actually been two days since FCP X was launched, and of course there’s been a strong buzz about it in the market. Video professionals were not only impressed with the new features, but with the new price too. Final Cut Pro X is available in the Mac App Store for $299.99. Compare that to 2009, when the fully loaded Final Cut Studio retailed for $999.99.

Final Cut Pro X is a big update for the powerful editing suite, in no small part because it is now (finally) built with 64-bit support. That means that the app will be able to take advantage of the additional memory space in Mac OS X Snow Leopard and the upcoming Mac OS X Lion.

Installing Final Cut Pro X
Since the only way to get Final Cut Pro X is through the Mac App Store, installation is easy: You just click "Buy" in the store, and the app's icon appears in your Finder, ready to run. You'll be able to install it on five Macs, and you receive updates automatically. The program requires at least a Core 2 Duo-based Mac running Snow Leopard, a decent video processor, 2.4GB of disk space, and 2GB RAM (4GB recommended).


The big new feature is called the Magnetic Timeline, which takes a trackless approach to editing. Like Adobe, Apple has also put a lot of effort into what it calls Content Auto-Analysis, which is another way of saying that the software uses meta-tags to better organize and import content, based on shot type, media format and other information.

Check out this video Apple released to show off the new features in Final Cut Pro X:



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24 June 2011, 11:11 am 828ed496d384fb6fa2923179133ff492
<![CDATA[Shortie Awards Youth Film Festival]]> Found: submit, awards, award, entries


Hollyn Randolph just mailed me in about the forthcoming Shortie Awards film festival.

The Shortie Awards film festival will be held June 5, 2011 in Arlington, VA a suburb of Washington D.C. The Shortie Awards recognizes original short film productions created by student filmmakers, ages 7-18, and their teachers.

This year we have entries from 26 states and 14 countries and India has 36 entries which is the largest number from outside of the US.
Apparently the last date for submitting the entries was April 1, 2011. But we can look forward to the screenings and the winners. Those who live around Arlingtom and Washington DC should attend the event!

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6 May 2011, 5:28 am eaf309efd7724c81c4b80892e456a4ca
<![CDATA[Short Film: Damn Your Eyes]]> Found: awards, award

David Guglielmo, an alumni of School of Visual Arts, New York emailed me his short film titled Damn Your Eyes.
damn your eyes

Damn Your Eyes a Spaghetti Western-influenced revenge film shot on the Sony EX1 digital camera in the NY Metropolitan area for $5,000. It has been successful at film festivals and recently won two awards.


WINNER: "Best Student Film" at Royal Flush Festival '09
WINNER: "Best More Than Horror Short" at Buffalo Screams Horror Festival '10


I liked the visual quality of the film: the lighting, the locations, set, framing, composition etc. The DoP used the Sony EXI camcorder given to him pretty well. Most of the actors did a really professional job and that took the movie experience a notch higher. The screenplay could have been written better. Some of the moments in the movie were clichéd and boring but on the whole it is a decent production. What do you think of the movie? Please watch and comment (feed subscribers will need to visit the blog to watch it).

David Guglielmo must be congratulated for doing his excellent direction. Considering he is relatively new to this profession, he has done a laudable job that commands appreciation.
 Digital filmmaking is indeed growing from strength to strength.

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26 April 2011, 5:52 am 776bfdbc7b6be1364d824c007ec92690
<![CDATA[Tribeca Film Festival Launches Online Version]]> Found: submit
I had recently blogged about Tribeca Film Festival's announcement of filmmaking grants for funding documentaries of social significance. Well now it has gone a step further further launched an online version of the increasingly popular movie fest.

According to Hollywood Reporter, the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival, which kicks off from April 20 and ends on May 1 in New York city, will have a new online component where audiences will be able to watch live streams of events and interact with other audience members.

Online audiences will also be allowed to submit questions to a host of festival executives and other notable guests and access detailed information on all of the online fest filmmakers. There will also be a Future of Film blog that will include posts from film and technology experts.

If you want to know about the screenings at Tribeca 2011, check out the Tribeca Film Festival 2011 film guide .

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23 March 2011, 7:50 pm 0c4b2e928c429528894ee3a1ebb2055c
<![CDATA[Salon Films launches filmmaker training program]]> Found: opportunity
Salon Films will launch a cross-border training program for young Singapore and Hong Kong filmmakers, and a funding initiative in connection with the Hong Kong government subsidy for filmmakers.

The training program is organized with the Media Development Authority of Singapore to bring budding Singaporean filmmakers to work in Hong Kong and China.

The program began in Hong Kong, in partnership with the Academy of Film of the Hong Kong Baptist University, and continues in Beijing, Shanghai, Suzhou, in cooperation with the China Film Foundation and CCTV, and will conclude in the Hengdian studio, lasting three weeks in each city.

The film crew is shooting a documentary to commemorate the 20th anniversary the establishment of economic relations between China and Singapore.

"Asian culture shares common origins," Wang said, "The training program is aimed at providing an opportunity for young filmmakers across Asia to meet, exchange ideas, and make films that speak to our mutual cultural roots."

To capitalize on the current prevalence of Hong Kong-Chinese co-productions and the growing film industry in China, the program also intends for young filmmakers and film students to obtain hands-on practical experience in China.

Film students at the Academy of Film of the Baptist University will also join the Salon team in Beijing and Hengdian.

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10 January 2011, 10:02 am 2c1f2abad90e1b3a777f8cf10e1b2292
<![CDATA[Tribeca announces filmmaking grants]]> Found: submission, deadline, award
The Tribeca Film Institute announced Wednesday its submission period for grants is now open. TFI will award more than $500,000 in filmmaker support through 2011 and more than $100,000 through its new TFI Documentary Fund, presented by HBO.


The Gucci Tribeca Documentary Fund provides finishing grants totaling $100,000 to feature-length documentaries that highlight and humanize topics of social significance. The TFI Sloan Filmmaker Fund will award up to $140,000 to support compelling narrative filmmaking that explores scientific, mathematic and technological themes.

The Tribeca All Access Program will continue cultivating relationships between filmmakers from traditionally underrepresented communities and film industry executives, and provide each 2011 participant with $10,000. And, the TFI Latin America Media Arts Fund will support film and video artists working in narrative or documentary film and living in Mexico, Central and South America.


“We are excited to expand the reach and depth of our programming to support individual artists in the field,”
 said TFI artistic director Beth Janson.


The early submission deadline is Nov. 8; final deadline is Dec. 8. More info: tribecafilminstitute.org.

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17 September 2010, 2:08 pm 0d32c63914b979f28151b88278a36904
<![CDATA[Taiwan's Tsai Liang is Asian Filmmaker of the Year]]> Found: awards, award, jury
South Korea's most prestigious film festival said Wednesday it has chosen Taiwanese director Tsai Ming Liang as its Asian Filmmaker of the Year.


The Pusan International Film Festival praised Tsai's work over the past three decades for pioneering unexplored areas that overcome the limitations of the art film industry.

"His 30-year-long devotion to filmmaking has greatly influenced Asian cinema and made considerable contributions to enhance the global status of Asian cinema," it said in a statement.


"He is renowned for seeking fresh ways of communicating with his audience... We can find the root of his endless spirit of challenging himself and the borderlines of art in his earlier works in the 1990s."

Malaysian-born Tsai is best known for "Vive L'Amour" that won the Golden Lion (best picture) award at the Venice Film Festival in 1994, and "The River" that won the Silver Bear/Special Jury Prize at the 1997 Berlin International Film Festival.


The 52-year-old has also won numerous awards with other films.

He is considered a leading exponent of the "Second New Wave" -- a group of Taiwanese directors in the 1990s who produced films with realistic and sympathetic portrayals of life rather than melodramas or action pictures.


The festival, held in the southern port city of Busan since 1996, will be staged from October 7-15 this year.

]]>
6 September 2010, 5:47 am 3096856fd18a45600538a63171daf7c9
<![CDATA[Jumpstart Your Film and Television Career: 5 powerful TIPS on how to land more tv film jobs than you can handle]]> Found: opportunity
This is a guest post by Ian Agard of ianagard.com. Ian is a Toronto based writer/director/film producer who loves to entertain and inspire people through his movies and his filmmaking blog.



As you probably know, one of the most desirable yet challenging industries to make a living from is in the film and television industry.

By far, the most commonly asked question I receive from people throughout my six years working as actor, screenwriter, director and film producer is...how do you get into the industry and make a living?

As a film producer; I have interviewed, hired and worked with several casts and crews while making my films. It becomes quite easy to notice the difference between individuals who struggle to find film/tv work and those who make a comfortable living.

Is it about luck?

Or

Who you know?

I would like to share with you 5 POWERFUL TIPS that will help you jumpstart your film/tv career and get you on the road towards landing more paying industry work than you can handle.


TIP Number One: Be Willing To Work For Free

I know, you probably didn’t want to hear that but it’s imperative that you are willing to either work for free or very low pay. It’s a sacrifice that many in the entertainment industry must do when starting out, however, you’ll have the opportunity to meet others in the business as well as learn on the job. Taking “free” jobs quickly leads to full time careers.


TIP Number Two: Attitude Is Everything

This is one of the most important tips regarding developing a successful film/tv industry career. More important than your talent, your experience or your education; your attitude will determine how far you will rise within your career.
It will determine if people will refer job opportunities to you or hire you again for future projects. You must be a flexible, professional, team oriented person who is committed to “serving” the story/project to the best of your ability.

Production sets are full of egos, there’s no need for one more.

TIP Number Three: Recognize and seizure opportunity

You’ve probably heard the old saying luck is when preparation meets opportunity. I like to believe in a slightly different statement, luck = opportunity + willingness.
A certain film/tv industry work opportunity might present itself to you; you’re prepared...but are you willing to maybe work for free, work for low pay, work 12 hour days, be team-oriented, be flexible and agreeable or go the extra mile to help the project succeed.

TIP Number Four: Network and be visible

The reality of the film/TV industry is that most production jobs are never advertised. Those positions are usually filled through word of mouth and pre-established relationships. That’s why it is extremely important for you to always be committed to meeting new like-minded people.
The best places to meet and connect with people who share your zeal and passion are:

1) Onset while shooting a movie or television show
2) Through industry specific classes
3) At film festivals

TIP Number Five: Always be learning

As humans, we are learning machines. We are most alive and functioning closest to our potential when we are learning, adapting, adjusting and finding new ways, approaches and techniques to improve our lives (and our careers)in some way.

No matter how many years working experience you might have within the film/TV industry it would be hugely important for you to maintain a beginner’s mindset. A beginner looks constantly for one new tibit, one or more ways to expand on their current expertise.

To learn more valuable tips and in-depth advice, listen to my MP3 60 minute audio interview with film and television expert and veteran Stephen Dranitsaris at: www.ianagard.com/tv-film-jobs

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23 April 2010, 6:57 pm 0f5b78331581dc53a92c92be85a8445a
<![CDATA[Sharon Ellis at Christopher Grimes Gallery]]> Found: calls, call

Hunter Drohojowska-Philp calls the mid-career artist's paintings transcendent

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3 April 2014, 6:30 pm b4c529641afad72ea741f40c412fb665
<![CDATA[Hannah Höch, Whitechapel Gallery, art review]]> Found: calls, call

“Hannah Höch the Dadaist” is the way that this German artist is usually pigeon-holed in art history. And indeed she was a leading member of the movement in Berlin in the 1920s, full of the calls for artistic revolution, the rejection of all that had gone before, the hectic partying and the collage works which made this movement so energetic and so productive.

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19 January 2014, 1:21 pm 126e9213fa11c3275bf46b6cf8d28d14
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

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31 July 2009, 4:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: call, opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

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1 July 2009, 7:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[*1420.1 - Pink Submission]]> Found: submission
Sarah Fox: Pink Submission - Artist Comments

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10 July 2010, 5:33 am a2911597c20f33fdbf000438f8d17462
<![CDATA[*1299.1 - Enron Award - 2001 World’s Best Companies with letter addressed to Ken Lay]]> Found: award
Global Fin@nce: Enron Award - 2001 World’s Best Companies with letter addressed to Ken Lay - Curator Comments

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13 June 2009, 5:38 am 2b72dde3665b582cb21b2f1006364f8d
<![CDATA[*1195.1 - 2006 British Television Advertising Awards]]> Found: awards, award
Peter Bigg: 2006 British Television Advertising Awards - Curator Comments

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24 October 2008, 5:31 am a9cedc8742710412bdc8591616fcd308
<![CDATA[They call it puppy love]]> Found: call

Philly photographer Chris Sembrot photographs owners kissing their dogs.

The article They call it puppy love by Erin Edinger-Turoff appeared first on The Temple News.

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8 April 2014, 2:30 am 261254b911f75c78f5275203d2c70409
<![CDATA[Art students answer the call]]> Found: call

Two Tyler students organized the “Call + Response” show.

The article Art students answer the call by Alexa Bricker appeared first on The Temple News.

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24 March 2014, 10:40 pm b9e46040fd3f252a40cde32a01045e47
<![CDATA[Residency leads to collaboration]]> Found: residency

Artist Katie Grinnan incorporated student work into her art.

The article Residency leads to collaboration by Alexa Bricker appeared first on The Temple News.

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19 November 2013, 7:40 am d972cc21ef1092d3030948723d5ad79c
<![CDATA[A View from the Top]]> Found: calls, call

Conrad Benner’s blog calls attention to Philly’s street art culture.

The article A View from the Top by Patricia Madej appeared first on The Temple News.

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22 October 2013, 7:00 am ab22eb0314161cf2be5d7d6f820607e1
<![CDATA[Philly art contest asks users to Instagram]]> Found: calls, call

Visit Philly is teaming up with the campaign With Art Philadelphia for a contest that calls for some creativity. The organization is utilizing social media by encouraging Instagram and Twitter users to take photos of Philadelphia art and apply the hashtag “#PhillyArtContest.” Caroline Bean, the director of social media at Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation, helped make the new photo contest come alive.…

The article Philly art contest asks users to Instagram by Chelsea Finn appeared first on The Temple News.

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10 September 2013, 4:40 am 1c36f7c1b192bef403a011270d66bf79
<![CDATA[3rd Street Gallery’s Philadelphia Community Exhibit puts local talent on display]]> Found: submit

Local artists of any skill level could submit art to the gallery's Philadelphia Community Exhibit, which opens to the public today, Jan. 30.

The article 3rd Street Gallery’s Philadelphia Community Exhibit puts local talent on display by Cheyenne Shaffer appeared first on The Temple News.

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30 January 2013, 12:29 pm dedc6f2fab4e4f28c26b1f2276af465e
<![CDATA[‘RAW’ talent showcased in awards ceremony]]> Found: awards, award

The RAW Awards will showcase design talent in Philadelphia, with winners advancing to compete on a national level.

The article ‘RAW’ talent showcased in awards ceremony by Taylor Farnsworth appeared first on The Temple News.

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13 November 2012, 6:40 am e65a42447086a34bf10b9436822cb259
<![CDATA[Tokyo Type Directors Club Exhibition 2014]]> Found: awarded, awards, award, entries

poster for Tokyo Type Directors Club Exhibition 2014
Tokyo Type Directors Club Exhibition 2014
at Ginza Graphic Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-04-04 - 2014-04-28)

The Tokyo Type Directors Club Exhibition 2014 presents the results of the “Tokyo TDC Annual Awards 2014,” an international design competition sponsored by the Tokyo Type Directors Club. This year’s competition drew a total of 2,958 entries (1,960 from Japan and 998 from overseas). Following a rigorous screening process, the following prizes were awarded: 1 Grand Prize, 4 TDC Prizes, 3 Special Prizes, 1 RGB Prize, 1 Book Design Prize, and 1 Type Design Prize.

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3663756693b66f70ca7431e5f12df048
<![CDATA[Japan Typography 2014 Exhibition]]> Found: submissions, submission

poster for Japan Typography 2014 Exhibition
Japan Typography 2014 Exhibition
at Mihoncho Honten (Chiyoda area)
(2014-04-14 - 2014-05-15)

The Japan Typography Association and the New York Type Directors Club introduce winners of this year’s annual contest, including grand prix and best work prize winners chosen from among domestic and international submissions. The power and detail of these works of graphics, packaging, editorial design, book binding, and typography are vivid in a way that cannot be conveyed in photographs. [Related Event] Special Talk “Japan Typography 2014 Grand Prix” Speakers: Grand Prix winners and judges Date: 5/1 (Thurs) 18:00–19:00 Free, reservations required Please see the official website for details and reservations.

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e7efb1995973fa5edc6b5e76ee1bdf97
<![CDATA[Kaoru Kasai “Hiroshima Appeals”]]> Found: awarded, award

poster for Kaoru Kasai “Hiroshima Appeals”
Kaoru Kasai “Hiroshima Appeals”
at Creation Gallery G8 (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-04-08 - 2014-05-15)

The Yusaku Kamekura Award was founded in 1999 in support of the development of graphic design and in its 16th year was awarded to Kaoru Kasai for his peace campaign posters “Hirohima Appeals 2013”. Well know for his commercial work with Suntory Oolong Tea and United Arrows, while also lending his hand to package design, film and theater advertising, Kasai brought his graphic powers to new heights in the “Hiroshima Appeals 2013” peace campaign poster series, distilling the very core of graphic design and deservedly winning him this prestigious award. [Image: Kaoru Kasai Peace Campaign Poster “Hiroshima Appeals 2013”

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2c7cb65caa60d2a3e7d2d0a27e90469c
<![CDATA[JAGDA Newcomer Award 2014]]> Found: award

JAGDA Newcomer Award 2014
at Creation Gallery G8 (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-05-20 - 2014-06-24)

Posters and small graphic works from the three winners of this year’s JAGDA Newcomer Award, established in 1983 in the support of talented young designers.

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992798890cafad5cd5f906a42f90f658
<![CDATA[Huge ants are the stars of the show at the Saatchi Gallery]]> Found: call

The visitor to Pangaea: New Art from Africa and Latin America at the Saatchi Gallery is confronted by sculptures of huge ants, crawling all over the walls of the first room. They are monstrous – the size of human babies. They clamber over one another, desperate to gorge on some hidden patch of honey. Some are solitary, others cluster in corners. They call to mind Kafka's travelling salesman Gregor, who transformed into an insect overnight and spent the rest of his days crawling up and down his bedroom walls.

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1 April 2014, 7:00 pm f12463889440c0214e4b13cf61bbf94b
<![CDATA[Inside Cristiano Ronaldo's museum: 'I have room for more trophies']]> Found: awarded, award

What to do when your trophy cabinet gets too full? If you are Cristiano Ronaldo, you build your own museum. As storage solutions go, it sounds extreme but Ronaldo, the world’s most expensive and highly paid footballer and arguably the world’s finest and vainest too, operates in extremes. Museu CR7, dedicated to the life and times of the Portuguese forward, 29, opened in his native Funchal, on the island of Madeira in December. It contains every trophy Ronaldo has ever won, from the tiny tarnished gold cup he received as top scorer for his local team Andorinha, aged eight, to the 2013 Fifa Ballon d’Or, awarded to him as the best player on the planet last month.

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25 February 2014, 12:57 pm 2e4e8712c6d7b78aab562afc7f668f41
<![CDATA[Mark Wallinger: London's line of beauty]]> Found: opportunity

Last summer, as we walked along the Thames after an opening at Tate Britain, my friend Megan Piper first shared her idea for The Line. She talked about a sculpture walk that would provide an opportunity to exhibit work that is currently hidden from public view. The great appeal of the idea was how relatively easy it would be to make happen. As an artist, I am used to the fact that the vast majority of my work is in storage. Her idea was not to commission work, but to provide an opportunity to present existing work that is currently stored, and unseen. Any artist, collector or museum can only ever show a small proportion of artworks that it possesses at any one time.

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11 February 2014, 7:00 pm 5488f47d433f6e0c03da9b524be77a76
<![CDATA[What's it like to work for somebody famous?]]> Found: calls, call

If you were to believe the headlines, being a personal assistant to a high-profile figure is all middle-of-the-night phone calls, outlandish demands and having the odd BlackBerry launched at you (as Naomi Campbell's former aide can attest).

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14 January 2014, 7:00 pm 5c149641e75f129ab7f81f8041f59df3
<![CDATA[In the studio: Elizabeth Ogilvie, artist]]> Found: call, opportunity

Elizabeth Ogilvie lives in a converted cinema facing the sea in Kinghorn, Fife, an hour north of Edinburgh, Scotland. She and fellow artist Robert Callender, her late husband, brought the cinema while they were working in Leith. “Our work had outgrown the studio, which was a very low old stable block and we could not see how the final work would look before it was installed. We decided it will give the work the opportunity to flourish in this new environment.”

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10 January 2014, 7:00 pm 7953d7a05fc80e9365607abe8f426273
<![CDATA[A Tile and A Vessel - Silver City, New Mexico]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,450 in awards. Deadline: April 30, 2014

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275ab8cd4bbc760e734b6eb7f56fc7b3
<![CDATA[21st Annual Maritime Art Exhibition - Coos Bay, Oregon]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,250 in awards. Deadline: May 3, 2014

]]>
92bbfb219d51e8bc01201c55879c1bac
<![CDATA[3rd Bi-annual Open Juried Online International Art Competition]]> Found: deadline
$1000 cash prize. Deadline: May 4, 2014

]]>
3f68d8231f01dc7b684652df785c395f
<![CDATA[Dorthea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize - Durham, North Carolina]]> Found: deadline, award
$10,000 award plus a solo exhibition. Deadline: May 7, 2014

]]>
1edb9488a25e5bc06a29893923ba4672
<![CDATA[San Francisco International Photography Exhibition - San Francisco, California]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000 in awards. Deadline: May 8, 2014

]]>
3386973b5c374213ef19f2c9a5db8a91
<![CDATA[48th Annual Lewiston Art Festival - Lewiston, New York]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: May 9, 2014

]]>
e9056b9bf293f8d0c973af6b25b0952f
<![CDATA[34th Annual Spring Photography Contest - Online competition]]> Found: deadline
Over $7,500 in cash and prizes. Deadline: May 12, 2014

]]>
088615b40e1b984bdf371e5c10087ad0
<![CDATA[International Call for Entry: Transportation - New York, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: May 18, 2014

]]>
61592a6dba9e3daa5423b5e9b190e43d
<![CDATA[Pip Squeak, Small Works, Big Vision - Northbrook, Illinois]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,700 in awards. Deadline: May 31, 2014

]]>
e50dfba917e1fb51f811b0c1ac703736
<![CDATA[5th Annual Nature and Wildlife Exhibition - St. Augustine, Florida]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: June 2, 2014

]]>
81ec2aea47fc4f63cc1a3bd97e845080
<![CDATA[BWAC National Juried Art Show - Brooklyn, New York]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: June 2, 2014

]]>
a4737e6bce8405b0452f8950d12ec215
<![CDATA[Private ProJECT Outdoor Digital Exhibition - Silver City, New Mexico]]> Found: deadline
$1,000 prize. Deadline: June 14, 2014

]]>
e99899fcbd36143a12fdffe7c9b71f77
<![CDATA[Can You See Me Now - Staten Island, New York]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in cash awards. Deadline: June 17, 2014

]]>
73976995b5617d27cb737b15023ca553
<![CDATA[2014 Art Kudos International Juried Competition - Online Exhibition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$4,500 in cash awards. Deadline: June 30, 2014

]]>
681e90da1a9f5237780a25f632901810
<![CDATA[Colors of Life 2014: international photo contest - Washington DC]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,250 in awards. Deadline: June 30, 2014

]]>
b831503855e571fa4d675af7cfe96688
<![CDATA[The 3rd Eros Awards - Online exhibition]]> Found: deadline
$2000 Grand Prize. Deadline: June 30, 2014

]]>
e08901f518e9a88c9cc9e68078571c4c
<![CDATA[The Sixty-Second A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts: Out of Site in Plain View: A History of Exhibiting Architecture since 1750: Framed and Hung: Architecture in Public from the Salon to the French Revolution, Part 1]]> Found: entry
Barry Bergdoll, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and professor, Columbia University. In first lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on April 7, 2013, architectural historian Barry Bergdoll, presents diverse techniques of architectural display developed since the mid-18th century. Far from being poor substitutes for the real experience of architecture as a spatial art in situ, these techniques have been integral to architecture's stake in the evolving discourses of modernity. This lecture considers the entry of architects into the exhibition venues of the mid-18th century and radical new ideas for architecture under the French Revolution.

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5 November 2013, 8:00 am 977d6df13e9a41f3c53db49ebc1e7407
<![CDATA[Jeff Wall on His Work]]> Found: calls, call
September 2013 - Jeff Wall, artist. Canadian-born photographer Jeff Wall first became interested in photography in the mid-1960s. He was struck by the perfectionism that characterized the practice at that time—the idea that photographs should, and must, document the world as it is. Photography seemed to be strict reportage, instead of allowing for collaboration between the photographer and subject (as with cinematography). Films were composed of a series of still photographs, but the potential for collaboration within a single photograph had not yet been realized. In this lecture recorded at the National Gallery of Art on April 17, 1999, Wall discusses his work and his relation with what he calls cinematography. He works with performers and prepares the composition to create an image of something that he has actually seen. Through the large-scale photographs for which he is best known, Wall seeks to tell a fragment of a story and allow spectators to finish the story for themselves.

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3 September 2013, 9:00 am d721a9ec8ccc1bbfb462fe7e23015280
<![CDATA[Bronislava Nijinska: A Choreographer's Journey]]> Found: awarded, award
August 2013 - Lynn Garafola, professor of dance, Barnard College, Columbia University. Bronislava Nijinska, the sister of famed ballet dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky, was a pioneer of the modern tradition of ballet. In spring 2013, Lynn Garafola was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to support her research on Nijinska. In this lecture recorded on July 7, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art, Garafola shares her latest research and thoughts about how Nijinska's life and work not only illuminated modern ballet history, but 20th century culture as a whole. In 1913 Nijinska was evicted from her brother's production The Rite of Spring for getting married, an act that he perceived as a betrayal. Afterward, although she was no longer dancing for her brother, Nijinska still played a crucial role in the dissemination of modernism. The longevity of her career eclipsed that of her brother's, and her work influenced numerous dancers and choreographers. Held in conjunction with the exhibition Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909–1929: When Art Danced with Music, on view at the Gallery from May 12 to October 6, 2013, this lecture was supported in loving memory of Shirley Casstevens.

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20 August 2013, 9:00 am 5df47cc9e8e21a5bb8095e5e029c95e4
<![CDATA[Conversations with Collectors: Robert and Jane Meyerhoff]]> Found: residence
March 2013 - Robert and Jane Meyerhoff, collectors, in conversation with Irving Blum, collector and co-founder of the Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles. To celebrate the exhibition opening of The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection: 1945-1995 at the National Gallery of Art on March 31, 1996, the Meyerhoffs joined Irving Blum to discuss the history and practice of their collecting. On view through July 21, 1996, the exhibition presented 194 works, almost their entire collection of post-World War II art. The Meyerhoffs' acquisitions have been based wholly on their belief in the quality of individual works and not on any preconceived theory or plan. If they were passionate about an artist, they collected his or her work in depth. Their private residence has a room dedicated to each of the following artists: Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, and Frank Stella. The collection is both a tribute to the extraordinarily high level of accomplishment by these artists and to the Meyerhoffs' intuition.

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5 March 2013, 8:00 am f0a4c93d5c20dbb46eab7a09cf4f7c65
<![CDATA[William H. Johnson]]> Found: awarded, award
February 2013 - Gwendolyn H. Everett, assistant professor, department of art, Howard University Gwendolyn H. Everett, scholar and author of the award-winning children's book Li'L Sis and Uncle Willie: A Story Based on the Life and Paintings of William H. Johnson, provides an overview of William Henry Johnson's (1901-1970) career as part of the Five African American Artists lecture series recorded on August 3, 2003. Everett traces Johnson's determination to become an artist, despite a humble upbringing in South Carolina, to his years at a segregated elementary school where art was not part of the formal curriculum. In 1918, during the first Great Migration, Johnson moved to New York to pursue artistic training unavailable in the South. While living in Harlem and working several jobs to support himself, he was accepted into the prestigious National Academy of Design. Noted watercolorist Charles Webster Hawthorne provided critical mentorship at the academy, hired Johnson to work at the Cape Cod School of Art, and sponsored his further training in Europe. Johnson supplemented this sponsorship with prizes awarded by the academy and funds earned working for Ashcan School painter George Luks. In 1920s Paris, Johnson lived in the former studio of James McNeill Whistler and became acquainted with Henry O. Tanner, an African American expatriate artist who had achieved international acclaim and who would become a pivotal figure in Johnson's rise to prominence. Follow along as Everett illustrates Johnson's journey—marked by determination, strengthened by hard work, and bolstered by the support of influential artists—that led him to become one of the greatest American artists of the 20th century.

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19 February 2013, 8:00 am 2321c0b603bb514a53c5b2125b31d6d6
<![CDATA[Artists in Residence: Henry O. Tanner in the Holy Land]]> Found: residence
February 2013 - Gwendolyn H. Everett, lecturer, National Gallery of Art. As part of the Artist in Residence lecture series, Gwendolyn H. Everett focused on Henry Ossawa Tanner's (1859-1937) visits to the Holy Land, and how this travel affected the later religious paintings for which he achieved international recognition. In this podcast recorded on August 9, 1987, Everett explains the formative influence of Tanner's upbringing in an educated, religious family in post-Civil War Philadelphia. Tanner's father was a minister and, later, a bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and his mother administered a Methodist school. Tanner enrolled in the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts as the only African American student in 1879, graduating in 1885. His professor, the artist Thomas Eakins, encouraged a progressive method of study from live models instead of plaster casts, which profoundly affected Tanner. after 1891 Tanner resided primarily in France; by 1895 his paintings were mostly of biblical themes, and in 1897 he made his first trip to the Holy Land, where his firsthand experience led to mastery of religious subject matter. He visited the region several times to explore mosques and biblical sites, and to complete character studies of the local population, as he had learned from Eakins. Tanner invigorated religious painting with modernism and with his deeply rooted faith, achieving renown in the international art world.

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12 February 2013, 8:00 am 5ff28065373059eb12f69c3052526c1d
<![CDATA[Roy Lichtenstein's Kyoto Prize Lecture of 1995]]> Found: award
January 2013 - Harry Cooper, curator and head, department of modern art, National Gallery of Art, with original slides courtesy of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein. On November 11, 1995, Roy Lichtenstein was in Japan to receive the Kyoto Prize from the Inamori Foundation. In accepting the award, he delivered a lecture on the evolution of his work since his Pop breakthrough of 1961. Thanks to the generosity of the artist's estate and foundation, Harry Cooper, the National Gallery of Art's curator of modern art, presented this lecture at the Gallery, with the original slides, on January 9, 2013—in honor of Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective, the first major exhibition of the artist's work since his death in 1997. The exhibition was on view at the Gallery from October 14, 2012, to January 13, 2013.

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29 January 2013, 8:00 am 4baccc949c7ba076f8003aa2557ce3ce
<![CDATA[Architecture and Art: Creating Community]]> Found: call, award
June 2012 - David Adjaye, principal architect, Adjaye Associates; Elizabeth Diller, principal architect, Diller Scofidio + Renfro; Tom Finkelpearl, executive director, Queens Museum of Art; Sarah Lewis, art historian, author, and curator; and Robert Storr, chairman of FAPE's Professional Fine Arts Committee and dean of the Yale School of Art. In collaboration with the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies (FAPE) and in the spirit of its Leonore and Walter Annenberg Award for Diplomacy through the Arts, the National Gallery of Art hosted this annual panel discussion on May 15, 2012. Featuring noted architects David Adjaye and Elizabeth Diller, and moderated by Robert Storr, the program focused on how architecture and art bring people together in public spaces. Adjaye currently serves as the lead designer for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, which is slated to open on the National Mall in 2015. Diller, along with Ricardo Scofidio and Charles Renfro, recently completed the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts Redevelopment Project. Also participating were Tom Finkelpearl, executive director of the Queens Museum of Art, which broke ground last year on an expansion that will double its size; and Sarah Lewis, a PhD candidate at Yale University who is currently finishing RISE, a book that "explores the advantage of resilience and so-called failure in successful creative human endeavors."

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12 June 2012, 9:00 am caa2c9eb0c6710abdb7351b947b51a4c
<![CDATA[Solving the East/West Conundrum in Modern Chinese Art]]> Found: call
May 2012 - Martin J. Powers, Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures and former director, Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan. At the beginning of the 20th century, artists in China found themselves in a no-win situation: if they made use of Chinese brushwork, their art was considered "traditional," and if they adapted European or modernist methods, it was called "derivative." We may call this the East/West conundrum in modern Chinese art. Against the background of a long history of cultural competition in China, Martin J. Powers explores several ways in which Chinese artists managed to transcend the East/West conundrum in recent decades. Professor Powers delivered this lecture in both English and Mandarin on February 19, 2012, at the National Gallery of Art.

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1 May 2012, 9:00 am 3a4a845ef21b3ae449ff290350060e5e
<![CDATA[Conversations with Artists: Joel Shapiro, Thoughts on the Organization of Form in Modern Sculpture]]> Found: opportunity
March 2012 - Joel Shapiro, artist. Following the installation of Joel Shapiro's Untitled (1989) in the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden with other major post–World War II sculptures, the artist received an invitation to curate an exhibition of his work alongside the 19th-century sculpture of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. In this podcast recorded on March 9, 2003, Shapiro explains that the upcoming exhibition gave him on opportunity to focus on the continuity of thought in sculpture. Although certain ideas for form in sculpture seem radical and contemporary, their ideas have already been discovered and worked with in earlier times. Shapiro finds that the development of form seems to repeat itself, although it is ever-changing, more or less focused, and contextualized by the era in which it was created.

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13 March 2012, 9:00 am 897af458bedcf0ef2e084562c9199daf
<![CDATA[Conversations with Artists-Compositions and Collaborations: The Arts of Lou Stovall]]> Found: opportunity
February 2012 - Lou Stovall, artist, in conversation with Ruth Fine, curator of special projects in modern art, National Gallery of Art. As part of the National Gallery of Art summer lecture series Five African American Artists: Johnson-Tanner-Johnson-Stovall-Thomas, Lou Stovall participated in a Conversations with Artists program with Ruth Fine on August 3, 2003. "Compositions and Collaborations: The Arts of Lou Stovall" is a rare opportunity to hear Stovall discuss his own work and his collaborations with other artists, and to listen as he responds to questions from the audience. Stovall has been a major figure in the Washington, DC, arts community since the early 1960s, when he arrived at Howard University for his BFA program. In 1968 Stovall founded Workshop, Inc., a professional printmaking studio, where he has collaborated with more than 70 artists over the years. In addition to his own drawings and silkprints, and his collaborative printmaking projects, Stovall is a published essayist and poet.

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21 February 2012, 8:00 am dc89585113d3f4ba620b7d08ebcfc144
<![CDATA[Florence: Days of Destruction]]> Found: calling, call
December 2011 - Bryan Draper, Collections Conservator, University of Maryland Libraries; Norvell Jones, retired Chief of the Document Conservation Branch, National Archives; and Sheila Waters, calligrapher. Recalling the 45th anniversary of the catastrophic flood of Florence in 1966, the National Gallery of Art, in association with the University of Maryland Libraries presented a rare screening of Franco Zeffirelli's Florence: Days of Destruction (Per Firenze) on November 5, 2011. The famed Italian director's sole documentary is a heartfelt call to action containing the only known footage of the flood, accented by Richard Burton's voiceover commentary. The film is in the collection of the University of Maryland Libraries, College Park. Program speakers included Bryan Draper, Collections Conservator, University of Maryland Libraries; Norvell Jones, retired Chief of the Document Conservation Branch, National Archives; and Sheila Waters, calligrapher, who participated in the conservation efforts in post-flood Florence.

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13 December 2011, 8:00 am 55fdbbdb3b91564fd0607107315be7dc
<![CDATA[Morse at the Louvre]]> Found: award
November 2011 - A two-time Pulitzer Prize winning author and recipient of the National Book Award, David McCullough discusses his new book, The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris. In this podcast recorded on September 26, 2011, at the National Gallery of Art, McCullough tells the story of America's longstanding love affair with Paris through vivid portraits of dozens of significant characters. Notably, artist Samuel F. B. Morse is depicted as he worked on his masterpiece The Gallery of the Louvre. McCullough spoke at the Gallery in honor of the exhibition A New Look: Samuel F. B. Morse's "Gallery of the Louvre," on view from June 25, 2011, to July 8, 2012. The exhibition and program were coordinated with and supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

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15 November 2011, 8:00 am faae24724cfa6fcc69ed79e62dc15f12
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 6: Painting and Violence]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the sixth lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on May 19, 2002, Professor Michael Fried argues that Caravaggio's art should be understood not simply as a monument to a revolutionary style of pictorial realism, but also as an investigation into the psychic and physical dynamic that went into its making. Fried evokes this dynamic with concepts introduced in earlier lectures, including immersion and specularity, absorption and address, painting and mirroring, and optical and bodily modes of realism�what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act."

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30 August 2011, 9:00 am b5197218cd11ab04954958eaaa0238f6
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 5: Severed Representations]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the fifth lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on May 12, 2002, Professor Michael Fried discusses how the "violent" birth of the full-blown gallery picture (as seen in Judith and Holoferenes) is figured in Caravaggio's art as beheading or decapitation, an allegory for the act of painting.

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30 August 2011, 9:00 am 208bee2a69d85d49b78f340bed2b3b43
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 4: Absorption and Address]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the fourth lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on May 5, 2002, Professor Michael Fried explores how two polar entities in Caravaggio's art--absorption and address--lead to the emergence of the gallery picture.

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23 August 2011, 9:00 am f1bea4046aff5167520c8b61b34e737a
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 3: The Invention of Absorption]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the third lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on April 28, 2002, Professor Michael Fried argues that Caravaggio's depiction of his figures as so deeply engrossed in what they are doing, feeling, and thinking is revolutionary.

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16 August 2011, 9:00 am cd4ace497aa4170fb490a18d6de77f85
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 2: Immersion and Specularity]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the second lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on April 21, 2002, Professor Michael Fried addresses Caravaggio's engagement with the act of painting, and contrasts that with specular moments of detachment. Fried argues that this divided relationship lies at the heart of Caravaggio's most radical art.

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9 August 2011, 9:00 am 18d65c3b572afe708aed2e326ce3bd8e
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 1: A New Type of Self-Portrait]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University. In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the first lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on April 14, 2002, Professor Michael Fried opens the lecture series with a discussion of Caravaggio's Boy Bitten by a Lizard. He argues for its significance as a disguised self-portrait of the artist in the act of painting.

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2 August 2011, 9:00 am 794cf03fc2b84c9a5b50476a47409eb4
<![CDATA[Elson Lecture 1998: I. M. Pei in conversation with Earl A. Powell III]]> Found: awarded, award
April 2011 - I. M. Pei, architect, in conversation with Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art Legendary architect I. M. Pei appears in conversation with Gallery director Earl A. Powell III to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the opening of the East Building of the National Gallery of Art. In this podcast recorded on March 26, 1998, Pei discusses the evolution of the East Building�s design and construction from the time Pei was awarded the commission until the building was dedicated by President Jimmy Carter on June 1, 1978.

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12 April 2011, 9:00 am fb5219651d35827281a6a2a1345c2e2f
<![CDATA[Film Design: Translating Words into Images]]> Found: award
January 2011 - Patrizia von Brandenstein, Academy Award�winning production designer. Production designers define the appearance of a film, bringing to life written scripts by working with producers, directors, and their crews to achieve the desired look of a picture. Academy Award winner Patrizia von Brandenstein shared her practical knowledge of production design and used clips from several of her films, including Amadeus (1984), Six Degrees of Separation (1993), and The Last Station (2010), to illustrate the result of many years of research and visual interpretation.

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25 January 2011, 8:00 am 7013b1fdf9ab32517260ffbd49995951
<![CDATA[Martin Puryear: "Sculpture that Tries to Describe Itself to the World"]]> Found: opportunity
September 2010 - Ruth Fine, curator of special projects in modern art, National Gallery of Art. In this podcast recorded on June 22, 2008, for the Martin Puryear retrospective exhibition opening at the National Gallery of Art, curator Ruth Fine discusses the work of District of Columbia native Martin Puryear. The retrospective included 46 sculptures made between 1975 and 2007. The first exhibition in the Gallery's history to be installed in both the East and West Buildings, it provided a unique opportunity to view Puryear's sculpture in modern and classical settings. Fine discusses the installation process for Puryear's work at the Gallery, designed in collaboration with the artist, as well as the intentions behind the placement of sculptures.

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28 September 2010, 9:00 am 34d1a812d7c4996e580c69657338ea89
<![CDATA[Graft by Roxy Paine]]> Found: calls, call
December 2009, Behind the Scenes - Molly Donovan, associate curator, department of modern and contemporaryart, National Gallery of Art, Washington. In 2009 the National Gallery of Art commissioned American sculptor Roxy Paine to create a stainless steel Dendroid, as the artist calls his series of treelike sculptures, for the Sculpture Garden. In this podcast produced on the occasion of the completed work�the first contemporary sculpture installed in the Sculpture Garden in the nearly 10 years since it opened�associate curator Donovan talks to host Barbara Tempchin about Graft.

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8 December 2009, 8:00 am 0bf543506e49330314f518a1ea4791b6
<![CDATA[Telling the Edward Hopper Story]]> Found: award
September 2007, Backstory - Guest: Carroll Moore, film and video producer, National Gallery of Art. The iconic paintings and artistic impact of Edward Hopper are the subject of a new documentary film that accompanies the exhibition Edward Hopper on its Boston-Washington-Chicago tour. Award-winning producer Carroll Moore speaks with Tempchin about the making of this illuminating film.

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3 September 2007, 9:00 am b0e81bbdb22d778cef5c101b2de22f13
<![CDATA[Cecile Richards Remembers Her Mother, Ann Richards, Governor of Texas]]> Found: opportunity

Cecile Richards talks about her mother, Ann Richards, and the new HBO film “All About Ann: Governor Richards of the Lone Star State.” The documentary chronicles Richards’ life—from growing up poor in rural Texas to her life as a sociable suburban housewife and mother of four to entering politics and becoming one of the most charismatic American political figures of the last 30 years. Richards was the first woman to be elected to that office in the state of Texas. 

Cecile Richards described how her mother’s keynote speech at the 1988 Democratic National Convention changed her career: “We’d always known she was funny and she was in politics, but to have that opportunity to, sort of, as she would say, show what a woman can do when she’s given the chance – that’s really what the Democratic Convention did.”

From the very beginning of her public life, Ann Richards was open about her addiction. Her daughter explained, it was “not only because she wanted people to know who she was, but because she actually thought it might encourage other folks who were dealing with addiction to get treatment. And they did. I still, today, travel around the country and run into people who say, I got sober because of your mom.”

As governor, Richards appointed more women, openly gay people, and people of color than all of her predecessors combined. “She was all about not only about opening the door for herself, but holding it open and bringing everybody along with her that she could. And that to me is – that’s her legacy.”

“I think that everything she did was a little bit larger than life.”

“All About Ann” debuts on HBO April 28 at 9.  It will also premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 18.

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17 April 2014, 3:43 pm 474430fe7273a00d0bdcf9d326c2a47e
<![CDATA[MoMA Director Glenn Lowry on Expanding the Collection, Audience, and Building]]> Found: call, opportunity

Glenn D. Lowry, director of The Museum of Modern Art, talks about the museum’s transformation over the past two decades and its place in the cultural landscape of New York and the world.

Lowry said that since its founding, the Museum of Modern Art, has been devoted, committed to the idea of the future. “Everything we’ve done really since then has been about thinking about the collection, thinking about our audience, thinking about the kind of exhibitions that were essential to marking our own history and anticipating what was to come,” he explained.

He spoke about MoMA’s position as one of the most important museum’s in the word, and what it takes to maintain that status. “I think the formula for a great museum, and its true whether it’s the Museum of Modern Art or the Metropolitan or any other one, is really very simple,” Lowry said. “It is utterly dependent upon the quality and commitment of its trustees and the excellence of its staff. The reason that’s so essential is always the same thing, and that’s the art.”

The average age of MoMA’s audience has been going down, not up, as it has at other cultural institutions. “Clearly we want to connect with a new generation, the next generation, and if we can continue to do that, we’ll always be a place that’s about the future.”

Attracting a bigger audience and adding to the collection mean expanding the museum’s gallery space, said Lowry. “The expansion is driven by a very simple need: the ability to show more of our incredible collection under even better conditions.” He added, “Every decade there’s increased pressure to find more space. And it’s not that we can expand exponentially forever. We can’t. But we have the opportunity now to grow significantly—by 40 percent essentially—in terms of what we can show.”

When asked about the new expansion plans that have been widely criticized because they require the Folk Art Museum on 53rd Street to be demolished, Lowry said, “It’s of course controversial. Anything you do in New York is probably controversial.” The revised plans call for preserving the Folk Art Museum’s façade, but it’s not clear how or if it will be used in the new building’s design.

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16 April 2014, 3:43 pm 276d01725b46c5227e8ecae285485599
<![CDATA[Anna Chlumsky on Keeping It Together on "Veep"]]> Found: call

Anna Chlumsky talks about her Emmy-nominated role in the HBO comedy “Veep.” She plays Amy Brookheimer, the ambitious chief of staff to Vice President Selina Meyer, played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

Chlumsky explained how Amy approaches her job: "I think Amy fancies herself someone who is willing to lose some of the battles now, maybe in her personal life or, you know, in her dynamic with Selina, in order to win the long game…Amy’s like her one-woman mafia – every favor she does, she’s going to call in somewhere."

The cast of "Veep" has consulted with lots of people who work in politics. "We know that it’s only funny if it’s as rooted in truth as possible. Especially because it’s so farcical what we’re actually doing, so we’re very committed to tell people’s stories the way they know it and the way they live it."

She described the show's collaborative rehearsal process: “[creator and executive producer Armando Ianucci] likes to workshop his scripts…where he’ll have a draft that all these brilliant writers…will come up with. And then he gets the cast around a table, we all read it, and then we all get up on our feet and just muck around. And then all the writers’ll be furiously taking notes. And then in the next drafts you start to see some of the things that you did in that rehearsal period.”

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11 April 2014, 2:32 pm f56931f1af57aaca0288d448c922b586
<![CDATA[Scene and herd: Tracking bison with photographer Edgardo Aragón]]> Found: call, residency
Photo courtesy José Teodoro
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The latest video project by Edgardo Aragón – a finalist in the 2013 AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize – tracks bison across North American, in Wood Buffalo National Park in the Northwest Territories, in Yellowstone National Park and near Chihuahua in Mexico, his home country. We talked to him about the project, made possible by his AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize residency.

AGO: Of the three places you visited for your project, which was the most surprising, in terms of defying your expectations? Why?
Edgardo Aragón: I was very surprised and still I am about Fort Smith. Given the conditions under which people live in this place, it could seem impossible that there’s life there, but life exists, along with one of the strangest lights that I will ever see in my life.

Since going to these places, has your plan for the project changed?
Whenever I plan a new project, I always expect that the circumstances change the nature of the project itself. In this case the change happened, without a doubt. Natural conditions modify the project a great deal, complementing and giving body to it in a way that a sketch could not. I’m satisfied.

Many animal species migrate – why did you choose to focus on bison?
I chose the bison for two reasons. The first is that it had a natural frontier that would shift according to the climate conditions, modifying substantially the life of the First Nations people who depended on the bison to survive. They would conform to the bison’s behaviour. That’s why the project is not, in fact, trying to create a portrait of bison so much as one of the invisible men that has ceased to live in harmony with it.

The second reason is that this animal species does’t migrate. After nearly becoming extinct at the hands of the white man, it has endured some sort of domestication. Today it is a species in the process of recuperation in Mexico and Canada. It is curious to note that in the U.S., where there are more reserves, the bison is not a protected species and is limited to its territories. This domestication is an aspect of extermination as well, of the animal and its animal nature and, of course, of what little spirit of the First Nations people remains.

Why did you decide to use video for this project instead of still images?
Video is a more organic tool, more malleable. You can move it in many directions to generate a specific discourse or an open one. I think I choose video because I like having elements that are closer to a sense of physical presence, closer to the movement of the apparatus, to the presence of a witness and specifically to the manipulation of time. Duration plays a fundamental role in establishing the dimensions of the theme. The sounds of the places or the absence of such sounds plays a fundamental role in the atmospheres that I’m trying to convey and generate in the project.

When you gave an interview to the Northern Journal, you said, “In a way, the real subject of the video project does not exist…It’s an invisible phantom.” Can you elaborate on that? What is the real subject?
The subject I am portraying is the human who lived with the presence of the bison. That way of life is poorly understood by Eurocentric cultures. That was what I was interested in discovering or portraying. I followed the path of the bison because it represents the way First Nations people lived. All the vacant spaces left around the bison are the spaces left by earlier lives – lives lived within the cultural shock generated by contact with Europe – and the near-extermination of the bison. The creation of reserves for the native people of the Americas were really the extermination of a spirit that generated a sense of life.

With the westernisation of North America a philosophy of life was destroyed – a loss which we have not been able to fully understand yet. This is why I like to think about this video as a portrait of an invisible human being, a portrait of a philosophy of life inherent to the creative and cultural spirit of a human being that disappeared many years ago. The presence of reserves for human and animal species is only one of its forms of annihilation. This is the central objective of the project.

All photos courtesy of the artist. Keep up with this year’s Aimia | AGO Photography Prize on Twitter and Facebook.

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9 April 2014, 12:37 pm cc3c5e91644a0c601b636fb980c42b20
<![CDATA[Protecting Egyptian Antiquities from Looting]]> Found: award

For centuries, Egyptian archaeological sites have been looted–most recently to feed the black market trade of antiquities. Egyptian archaeologist Dr. Monica Hanna talks about the looting situation in Egypt, which has grown more pressing since the 2011 uprising. She’s used social media informed people about the problem and to enabled the return of stolen objects. Dr. Hanna is the recipient of the 2014 SAFE Beacon Award from the nonprofit SAFE/Saving Antiquities for Everyone.

Excerpt from "Egypt's Tomb Raiders," with Monica Hanna

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9 April 2014, 12:02 pm 26eb07993f8d8c6667e64d545b77d487
<![CDATA[The Gurus of How-To Tackle Spring]]> Found: call

The Gurus of How-To, Al Ubell and Larry Ubell, answer questions and give advice on how to repair and maintain your home or apartment. They'll offer tips on keeping your furnace in fine form, making sure your pipes don't freeze, and making sure you're home is heated and insulated efficiently.

Call 212-433-9692 with your questions or leave a comment below!

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9 April 2014, 12:00 am 191e3a0a4570287573ce822ad54fc99a
<![CDATA[The 2014 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize: Meet the jury]]> Found: call, residency, submit, awards, award, jury

Voting won’t begin until late summer, but the 2014 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize is well underway. Over the past few months, individuals around the world have been researching and discussing exciting new ideas and directions in fine art photography and putting forward the names of artists whose recent work has shown extraordinary potential. The nominators — a group of 13 curators, critics and artists — submit two artists each for inclusion on the long list, and then a three-person jury selects a short list of four. Later this year, the shortlisted artists’ work will be exhibited at the AGO and online, and the public vote will decide who wins the $50,000 CAD prize.

We’re happy to introduce you to this year’s jury, led by the AGO’s associate curator of photography, Sophie Hackett, and we hope you’ll follow along as the Prize develops in 2014. Keep an eye out for long-list and short-list announcements in the coming months, and follow the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize on Facebook and Twitter for more news.

This year’s jury:

jurorSophie

Sophie Hackett is the Associate Curator, Photography, at the Art Gallery of Ontario and adjunct faculty in Ryerson University’s master’s program in Photographic Preservation and Collections Management. She has contributed to several Canadian art magazines, international journals and monographs, and she has curated or co-curated several exhibitions and public projects at the AGO, including Suzy Lake: Rhythm of a True Space (2008); Barbara Kruger: Untitled (It) (2010); “Where I was born…”: A Photograph, a Clue and the Discovery of Abel Boulineau (2011); Songs of the Future: Canadian Industrial Photographs, 1858 to Today (2011); Album: A Public Project (2012) and Light My Fire: Some Propositions about Portraits and Photography (2013-2014), a wide-ranging consideration of the photographic portrait, drawn from the AGO’s permanent collection. Upcoming projects include What It Means To be Seen: Photography and Queer Visibility and Fan the Flames: Queer Positions in Photography — both opening in June 2014. She is the lead juror for the 2014 AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize, a role she also held in 2010 and 2012.


Laurie Simmons

Laurie Simmons (b.1949, USA) stages photographs and films with paper dolls, finger puppets, ventriloquist dummies and costumed dancers as “living objects,” animating a dollhouse world suffused with nostalgia and colored by an adult’s memories, longings, and regrets. Simmons’ work blends psychological, political, and conceptual approaches to art-making, transforming photography’s propensity to objectify people, especially women, into a sustained critique of the medium. She has received many awards, including the Roy Lichtenstein Residency in the Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome (2005), and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1997) and the National Endowment for the Arts (1984). She has had major exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Baltimore Museum of Art; San Jose Museum of Art, California; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and she has participated in two Whitney Biennial exhibitions (1985, 1991) and was included in the 2013 Venice Biennial. Her work is represented in many noted collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others.


HDK-Enwezor-Photo-Jeff-Weiner

Okwui Enwezor is a Nigerian-born, German-based scholar, curator, and writer and has been director of Haus der Kunst since October 2011. He was adjunct curator at International Center of Photography, New York, and previously adjunct curator of Contemporary Art, at the Art Institute of Chicago. Enwezor has served as the artistic director of several leading biennials and international exhibitions and in December 2013 he was appointed as director of the Visual Arts Sector of the 56th Biennale di Venezia. Enwezor’s curatorial credits include exhibitions presented in museums and venues across the U.S., Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, including Guggenheim Museum, Tate Modern, Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art Barcelona, Museo Tamayo, Mexico City, Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels, PS1 / MoMA, New York and the National Gallery of Canada. Enwezor has received numerous awards and honors for his work including an honourary fellowship from the Royal College of Art, London (2010) and an award for Curatorial Excellence from Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture, Bard College (2009). He lives in Munich and New York.


This year’s nominators were:

  • Grant Arnold, Audain Curator of British Columbia Art, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver
  • Veronica Cordeiro, curator, Centro de Fotografía de Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Moyra Davey, artist and nominee for the 2010 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize (then called the Grange Prize)
  • Jon Davies, associate curator, Oakville Galleries
  • Gary Dufour, adjunct associate professor, University of Western Australia and former chief curator/deputy director, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth
  • Tamar Garb, Durning Lawrence Professor in the History of Art, University College, London, U.K.
  • Gauri Gill, artist and winner of the 2011 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize (then called the Grange Prize)
  • Marie-Josée Jean, head of the VOX Contemporary Image Centre, Montreal
  • Mami Kataoka, chief curator, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo
  • Beatrix Ruf, director/curator, Kunsthalle Zürich, Zurich
  • Jonathan Shaughnessy, associate curator, Contemporary Art, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa
  • Brian Sholis, associate curator of Photography at the Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati
  • Kim Simon, curator, Gallery TPW, Toronto

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31 March 2014, 10:00 am 53c387052a13298c7f421c0507e7d68e
<![CDATA[Time to party: MASSIVE 10 artist projects and entertainment]]> Found: call, awarded, awards, award
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On April 10, 2014, see artwork by Katie Bethune-Leamen, Bruno Billio, Jorden Blue Doody & David James Doody, Randy Grskovic, Sean Martindale, Hazel Meyer, Talwst and Artistic Director Justin Broadbent created exclusively for MASSIVE 10, the 10th anniversary of the AGO’s Massive Party fundraiser. In addition to these artists, we’re pleased to announce a musical lineup that will keep guests dancing all night long, including DJ Filthy Gorgeous, DJ Soundbwoy, Johnny Hockin and Joseph Of Mercury / Joseph & The Mercurials. Guests will also be treated to a birthday fête at the Aimia Photo Booth by Melanie Cantwell Designs where they will receive a memento of the evening. Guests will also be invited to interact with the Absolut Vodka installation by MAKELAB.

Massive Party tickets have sold out for the past four years running, so get your tickets now!

Artists and project details

Justin Broadbent
Justin Broadbent
Katie Bethune-Leamen
Katie Bethune-Leamen
Bruno Billio
Bruno Billio
Photo: Jade Rude
Jorden & David Doody
Jorden & David Doody
Randy Grskovic
Randy Grskovic
Sean_Martindale
Sean_Martindale
Photo: Cindy Blazevic.
Hazel Meyer
Hazel Meyer
Talwst
Talwst
Melanie Cantwell
Melanie Cantwell

Justin Broadbent
Justin Broadbent is back for his second year as Massive Party’s Artistic Director after the hugely successful Massive Party GOLD in 2013. He is an accomplished Toronto-based multi-disciplinary artist. His portfolio includes works in video performance, poems, funny ideas, illustration, design, shirt design, music video direction and installation. Justin is also a self-taught photographer. As a video director, Justin has worked with bands such as Shad, Metric, Serena Ryder and Classified. He has been nominated for five MuchMusic Video Awards, including Rock Video of the Year and Hip Hop Video of the Year. Justin’s other awards include a Juno for Record Package of the Year and a CBC Bucky Award for Music Video of the Year. Justin makes a point of choosing layered projects that challenge his expectations. His work often centres around meaning-of-life topics, which he delivers with a glimmer of charm and wit. Justin’s work is inspired by the impossibility of a seed becoming a tree, thrift stores, clever lyrics and human perseverance. He spends his spare time outdoors, looking at the world as if for the first time and adding to his collection of porcelain cat figurines that adorn the mantle of his Toronto home. Justin also likes rappers Creemore and David Shrigley.

Katie Bethune-Leamen
Katie Bethune-Leamen works in installation, sculpture, video and drawing. She received a BFA from Concordia University (Montreal) and a MFA from the University of Guelph. Katie has exhibited across Canada, in Iceland, Japan, France, Australia, the USA, the Netherlands, England, Australia and other countries. Recent solo exhibitions include Shiny Object Person (Young Gallery, Art Gallery of Ontario). Recent residencies include Fogo Island Arts (Fogo Island, NL) and SIM (Reykjavik, IS), with ones upcoming at the Illulissat Art Museum (Ilulissat, GD) and The American Museum of Natural History (NYC). In 2012 Rick Rhodes, editor of Canadian Art magazine, listed her as one of the “Top 3 of 2012.” Katie is the recipient of numerous grants and awards. Her writing has appeared in Canadian Art, C Magazine, Border Crossings and others.

At MASSIVE 10 Katie will be bringing 10 artists into the Gallery to participate in art creation throughout the evening. Guests won’t want to miss the chance to watch creativity live as artists interpret the same reference image in 10 different ways.

Bruno Billio
Bruno Billio is a Canadian artist working from an interdisciplinary background. At once an installation artist, a sculptor and a designer, Bruno creates challenging works informed by his command of each of these practices. He is currently living and working in Toronto, and has been the resident artist at the Gladstone Hotel on Queen West, in the fashionable art gallery district in Toronto, for the past few years. Bruno Billio’s artistic practice is informed by the active displacement and staging of the found object, a contemporary art strategy with a historically established lineage. The everyday is reinterpreted through its spatial and contextual re-appropriation by the artist, who presents himself by proxy as both an interventionist and an inventor. Bruno has exhibited internationally in Milan, London, Miami, New York and Los Angeles. Bruno was also Massive Party’s Artistic Director from 2010-12 – shaping the vision for Massive Party Speakeasy, Marchesa Luisa Casati’s Massive Party and #thefutureofartis.

Jorden Blue Doody & David James Doody
Jorden Blue & David James Doody are both graduates from the University of British Columbia in Critical and Creative Studies. Although each artist offers a uniquely individual approach to the discourse of visual arts, they share a common focus on the materialism of cultural codification. Their combined individual practices have been heavily influenced by world travel and the cross pollination of mass media, ritual and fetishistic cultures. Their practice moves freely between new media, sculpture, and painting.

“As a collaborative team for the past seven years, we believe that communication has been the foundation of our artistic relationship. A common thread that can be traced throughout our work is that of collage. By sampling freely from a multitude of different sources, we are able to access unlimited individual histories, societal contexts and cultural symbols. For us, collage is more than just cut and paste, it is an immediate sense of being; it is our way of participating in the re-contextualization of our unfolding culture.” Through their open processes of art-making they allow happenstance to regurgitate cultural intuition in an act of artistic survival.

Randy Grskovic
Randy Grskovic is an artist and curator living in Toronto, Ontario. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts, in Advanced Media communication, from the University of British Columbia, Okanagan. Randy has shown his artwork and curated others in exhibitions across Canada at galleries including Equinox and Centre A in Vancouver, V-Tape in Toronto, L’oeil de Poison in Quebec City and Eastern Edge in St. John’s, NL. Randy is the former owner of experimental short-term galleries including The Age of Info(rmation), Cutty Contemporary and Good Luck Art Gallery.

For MASSIVE 10, Randy will be honouring the AGO on a milestone event, congratulating all the Massive Party attendees who help make programming at the gallery possible, as well as cheering on the artists who helped create MASSIVE 10. His piece will provide encouragement to all involved while highlighting the spectacle inherent in the event. Don’t miss out on receiving the recognition you deserve as a Massive Party attendee.

Sean Martindale
Sean Martindale is an emerging and internationally recognized interdisciplinary artist and designer currently based in Toronto, Canada. His interventions activate public and semi-public spaces to encourage engagement, often focused on ecological and social issues. Sean’s playful works question and suggest alternate possibilities for existing spaces, infrastructures and materials found in the urban environment. Frequently, Sean uses salvaged goods and live plants in unexpected ways that prompt conversations and interaction.

Sean’s projects have been featured on countless prominent sites online, as well as in traditional media such as print, radio, broadcast television and film. His practice has a global following and has been written about in countries all around the world, and in multiple languages. Sean was profiled for the first episode of the CBC’s Great Minds of Design, one of his lectures was filmed by TVO for their Big Ideas series, and his work was also included in the feature-length documentary This Space Available, released in 2011.

Hazel Meyer
Hazel Meyer is a visual artist and sports enthusiast based in Toronto. She draws pictures, text and comics, makes letterpress prints, screen-printed multiples, broadcasts and constructs physical environments that are used for performance, collaboration, workshops and amateur athletics. From the monumental to the modest her projects range from immersive installations, to small woven tags meant for an audience of one. Much like the tag line of The Litter Game, a collaborative project she started with Lucy Pawlak and Jim Skuldt in 2013, her practice is devoted to a forever shifting ratio of endurance, transgression and laughs, as ways of being in one’s body and the world. She holds an MFA from OCAD University (Toronto), a BFA from Concordia University (Montréal) and shows her work in galleries, artist-run centers and festivals inter/nationally.

Keep an eye out throughout MASSIVE 10 for Hazel’s presentation of NADIA! NADIA! The piece centres around the 1976 Montréal Olympic Games and 14 year old Romanian gymnast Nadia Comăneci who received what was then the first ever 10 to be awarded at the Olympics. The scoreboard used at the time had not been engineered for the four numbers that make up an Olympic 10 (10.00), so it was displayed as 1.00. This moment of utter physical prowess and domination is made even more radical by the inability of the technology to be able to represent it. This discord is the starting point for NADIA! NADIA!.

TALWST
His practice is a study in extremes. As a musical performer, TALWST (né Curtis Santiago) is larger-than-life. As a visual artist, he has spent the better part of six years building miniature dioramas, entire worlds that fit in the palm of your hand. TALWST creates exquisite landscapes inhabited by vivid characters—hand-painted and reconstructed Preiser’s figurines—freezing memories and moments inside reclaimed ring boxes. From 2007 to 2010, he apprenticed under Aboriginal artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun. In the past six years, TALWST has had six solo exhibitions in Toronto, New York, Edmonton and Vancouver. As a recording artist, he’s collaborated with Grammy-winning producer Illangelo to release his fourth solo album, Alien Tentacle Sex, to international acclaim in 2012.

For MASSIVE 10, TALWST is scaling up and exploring interactivity and spectatorship in a one-night-only piece. Dynasty 10-0 plays off the Massive party theme, 10, and builds on previous artwork examining Canadiana, race and identity construction. For Dynasty 10-0, TALWST is incorporating new media, textiles and performance. Influenced more by Trinidad and Tobago’s Carnival than participatory art, TALWST seeks to create the same spirit of role-play, interaction and fete. Instead of traditional Carnival characters he has cast actors to portray hockey players and coach dressing for the fictional team the Massives. The participation of event attendees will play a pivotal part in how this happening unfolds.

Melanie Cantwell
Melanie Cantwell is an interior decorator, stylist and set designer. Originally from Prince Edward Island, Melanie now resides in downtown Toronto and has a number of art and interior design-based projects on her list of accomplishments, ranging from residential clients and styling for a variety of design-based photo shoots. Melanie is currently the set decorator on the Steven and Chris show on CBC where she oversees the set styling and manages the look and aesthetic of each individual segment. Melanie studied fine arts and graduated with accreditations in advertising and marketing from Sheridan College and interior decorating from George Brown College.

At MASSIVE 10, see Melanie’s set design at the Aimia photo booth. Guests will be able to have their photos taken while wishing the AGO’s Massive Party a “Happy 10th Birthday” surrounded by sweet confections, balloons and other special touches befitting of this milestone celebration.

Filthy Gorgeous
Filthy Gorgeous is the seductive alias of Toronto born DJ, Kristin Leeder. After bursting onto the scene in 2007, Filthy Gorgeous forged an identity with sensual, rhythmic styles that immediately set her apart from her peers. With sets that draw on cutting edge dance music Filthy Gorgeous has become known for a sound that is both rich and complex. She has performed with and received praise from the world’s top international superstar musician/DJs such as Skrillex, Drake, Disclosure, Annie Mac, Nero, Flight Facilities, The Twelves, Tensnake, Theophiles London, Fred Falk and Alvin Risk.

From playing at local Toronto hot spot, The Hoxton, to sold out shows at The Fillmore Miami Beach, New York’s Webster Hall, a regular at various SOHO House locations and special events during Winter Music Conference (WMC), Filthy Gorgeous always leaves the crowd wanting more. A favourite amongst the fashion crowd she has developed long-lasting relationships and played events for some of the world’s leading Fashion and Lifestyle brands. Filthy Gorgeous continues to win fans by building her reputation as an exciting international DJ talent. Constantly evolving and never afraid to take risks, she has made it clear that Filthy Gorgeous is one to watch out for.

Johnny Hockin
Johnny Hockin is a Canadian DJ, musician and multimedia producer. He is a local Toronto fixture, using his wide-ranging taste and an eclectic repertoire to link classic soul, disco, rock, hip hop and electronic music into a sound uniquely his own. He consistently plays for high-end corporate clients and some of the city’s favourite rooms (from Soho House to Thomson to the Drake Hotel to L’Oreal Fashion Week).

He is also known to many Canadians as the former face of movies on MTV Canada, interviewing hundreds of filmmakers and stars. Over the course of 5 years, Ryan Gosling brooded with him, Nic Cage looked at him funny, George Clooney charmed him, Jason Bateman made fun of his name and Justin Timberlake sang to him. Werner Herzog follows him on twitter.

DJ Soundbwoy
Wake up world. Wake up to the aural mindtrip that is the Soundbwoy experience. Born and raised in Toronto, Canada – the city that comes alive when everyone else is asleep – Soundbwoy is the embodiment of what is needed to lead the next generation of music connoisseurs into a new dimension of existence. Unbound by convention, Soundbwoy offers those in attendance the ability to transcend the dance floor and travel on paths only found in dream sequences. He is far from mash up yet incapable of being categorized by any one genre; a musical everyman blessed with the gift of virtuosity behind the turntables. From soulful gems found through countless hours of crate digging to the most ominous of house anthems from the sun swept beaches of Ibiza, a Soundbwoy party is like travelling with a master storyteller crafting his latest fairytale while touching the deepest parts of your imagination. Feel the party transform into your personal looking glass and let Soundbwoy guide you through his universe like no one else can.
Wake up world.

Joseph & The Mercurials / Joseph Of Mercury
Born to the dying synthesized bells of the 80s. Reincarnated from the velvet gentleman of the 50s. Stark Dark & Echo Heavy. Influenced more by the haunting sounds of nature & cinema than by music itself, Joseph spins cavernous worlds of light & ocean, longing & romance… all with nothing more than his voice & the mournful call of a swooning guitar. Seduced by the beauty of fashion & design, enraptured in its drama & detail, Joseph cloaks himself in the colours of their world, as they are enveloped by the echoes of his sound. Each song has found its rightful place among the works of Victoria’s Secret, RW&Co., Members Only, Stockholm S/S/A/W, Fashion Magazine, & V Spain. As if by desire & fate. Desire is everything.

For more information about MASSIVE 10, visit massiveparty.ca.

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21 March 2014, 3:07 pm c572ad285d4f84f7e090e03a985be71d
<![CDATA[Saying goodbye to The Great Upheaval (and thanks to our visitors)]]> Found: opportunity

More than 140,000 people visited The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910-1918 at the Art Gallery of Ontario between November 30, 2013, and March 2, 2014. The exhibition was a rare opportunity to see works by a large group of outstanding artists — including Chagall, Kandinsky, Matisse, Modigliani, Mondrian and Picasso — from the collection of the Guggenheim Museum, New York.

The exhibition’s attendance ranks it close to other recent popular exhibitions at the Gallery: Ai Weiwei: According to What? and David Bowie is both drew crowds of about 145,000 each.

Thanks to everyone who helped bring it together, inside and outside the Gallery, especially to our friends at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, lead sponsor BMO Financial Group, generous supporters Gail & Mark Appel and Joan & Jerry Lozinski and hotel partner Eaton Chelsea Toronto. And to all 142,360 of you who visited the exhibition: we hope you’ll be back. Keep sharing your thoughts with us on Facebeook and at @agotoronto on Twitter and Instagram.

The Guggenheim exhibit at the @agotoronto was the best exhibit I've seen at the AGO yet! Definetly worth a visit if your in #Toronto #Art

— Jessica Lim (@jessica_m_lim) February 17, 2014

Very cool to see @agotoronto's Great Upheaval exhibition jam-packed today. Stunning collection and such a great way to spend a Sunday.

— ashley bursey (@ashbursey) February 9, 2014

The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910-1918 was made possible by lead sponsor BMO Financial Group, generous supporters Gail & Mark Appel and Joan & Jerry Lozinski and hotel partner Eaton Chelsea Toronto.

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20 March 2014, 9:00 am 05ac2fd9bc7157ed88ee345d37ed6f73
<![CDATA[Conservation Notes: Kress Fellow Tessa Thomas and posters of the Belle Époque]]> Found: calls, call, opportunity, awards, award
Tessa Thomas and a Toulouse-Lautrec poster.

Tessa Thomas and a Toulouse-Lautrec poster.

The Samuel H. Kress Foundation provides yearly grants to cultural heritage institutions to support a conservation training fellowship; only nine awards for Kress Conservation Fellowships were presented for the 2013/2014 year and the AGO is pleased that the foundation selected us to receive a grant. Maria Sullivan, manager of Conservation at the AGO, calls the fellowship for emerging conservators — administered by the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation — “a unique opportunity for the AGO and for conservation training in Canada.”

“Having a Kress Fellow here in the AGO Paper Conservation Lab is such a wonderful way to engage with our fabulous collection, with dynamic discussion and sharing of conservation principles and techniques within a large collecting institution,” says Joan Weir, the AGO’s conservator, Works on Paper.

DSC_1198
Fabric lining on the verso of a poster, 'Le Photographe Sescau' by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.
DSC_1195
Top edge with visible threads from poster lining. 'Le Photographe Sescau' by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

As our Samuel H. Kress Fellow in Conservation, Tessa Thomas’s work is focused on the conservation of Ross R. Scott and Donald R. Muller’s recent remarkable donation to the Gallery: more than 75 posters, prints and drawings by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and artists in his circle. The poster revolution of the late 19th century transformed the city of Paris, created an obsession with colour lithography among leading artists and shaped the future of printmaking, poster design and advertising. More than a century later we are still captivated by images of the notorious celebrities of the Belle Époque and with the ambiance of the cabarets, cafés and dance halls.

To begin, Thomas completed a condition survey of the collection to identify the overall condition of works within the donation and to distinguish the unique characteristics of each work by visual examination. The initial survey gave insight into the broad spectrum of materials within the collection and provided interesting findings. For example, there are a few posters that have revenue stamps that denote which posters may have been displayed publicly when they were first printed in the late 19th century. Many of the posters show ink stamps, but one poster in the collection has a unique paper stamp, as seen below.

DSC_1029_supp

The range in size of the posters is also quite significant, with the largest posters measuring between 160 to 164 centimetres high by 115 to 122 centimetres wide. Any major conservation treatment of these works is sure to present unique challenges and require special considerations. As a result, the next step for the treatment of the collection will be to determine treatment priorities and develop a treatment methodology for the posters. Thomas’s research into the production of Belle Époque posters includes looking into the history and practice of the lining of posters, including past and present preservation techniques. Look out for more posts on her progress as the project continues.

About Tessa
Tessa Thomas is the current Samuel H. Kress Fellow in Conservation at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Tessa is a graduate of the Queen’s University Master of Art Conservation Program and was the recipient of the 2011 Emerging Conservator Award presented by the Canadian Association for Conservation of Cultural Property (CAC). Tessa specializes in the conservation of paper objects and brings with her experience in conservation and collections care from cultural heritage institutions in Canada and abroad, including The National Archives, London, England; the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Royal Ontario Museum and the Archives of Ontario.


Curious about Conservation?
If you have a burning question about Conservation, leave a comment below. We’ll do our best to give you an answer in an upcoming Conservation Notes post.


Signature Partner of the AGO’s Conservation Program


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19 March 2014, 10:28 am fe9756d6e55bab97a320837b75d11f8a
<![CDATA[Listen: Meet the Artist, with Paul Graham]]> Found: awarded, award
Paul Graham, Untitled (Smoking girl in orange light)Paul Graham,
Untitled (Smoking girl in orange light), 1996–98, from the series end of an age.
Chromogenic print, 179.5 x 133.7 cm.
Gift of Alison and Alan Schwartz, 2000. 2000/1348 © Paul Graham; courtesy Pace Gallery and Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York.

Click to play:

Download 57.1MB MP3

Recorded: Oct. 17, 2013, at Jackman Hall, Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 1:23:13

Paul Graham is a British photographer based in New York. Lauded as “a profound force for renewal of the deep photographic tradition of engagement with the world,” he was awarded the 2012 Hasselblad award for major achievements in photography.

In conjunction with the exhibition Light My Fire: Some Propositions about Portraits and Photography

Generously supported by Penny Rubinoff

Signature Partner, Photography Collection Program

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10 March 2014, 10:00 am 007d3c123c112569002a8298619a0984
<![CDATA[Vermeer’s Young Woman Seated at a Virginal]]> Found: opportunity
October 26, 2013 - September 30, 2014: Vermeer painted less than forty pictures during his career and this one, Young Woman Seated at a Virginal, is believed to be one of his last. It is also the only remaining canvas by this great Dutch master to be in private hands. The Museum is immensely grateful to the Leiden Collection for the exceedingly rare opportunity to display this work; indeed, it has been almost ten years since a painting by Vermeer has been on view in Philadelphia.

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26 October 2013, 12:00 am f2ec8e0659a64fabafccc1b8f6592d37
<![CDATA[New York]]> Found: call, opportunity
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  Dynamically liaising with a distinguished client base of elite private collectors, decision-making art consultants, corporate art consultants, curators, architects, interior designers and decorators, as well as prestigious business, government, diplomatic and social VIPs, AMSTERDAM WHITNEY Gallery pre-eminently affords the acquisitor the extraordinary opportunity to acquire the most carefully curated, Contemporary Masters in the global art market.   Known as "The Most Beautiful Gallery in Chelsea,” AMSTERDAM WHITNEY Gallery is strategically located in the "Heart of Chelsea" the unrivaled, influential global epicenter of the art world. Home to over 200 leading galleries and the Chelsea Museum of Art, Chelsea is the ultimate undisputed international art destination for the informed acquisitor, decision based consultant and accomplished artist. The cachet of Chelsea attracts prominent art visitors worldwide.   In quest of the "creme de la creme" of global contemporary artists, AMSTERDAM WHITNEY Gallery's criteria is to highlight and showcase in a curated museum-caliber ambiance, Contemporary Masters and interpret significant art movements, reflecting diverse trends and mediums including Painting, Sculpture, Photography, Collage, Drawing & Watercolor. Featuring contemporary Representational Figurative art to Abstract work, modern Surrealism to today's Neo Post Impressionism, Portraits to Abstract Expressionism, AMSTERDAM WHITNEY Gallery is the acknowledged definitive global art resource for the informed collector, cognoscenti and professional art consultant. Its museum-curated, influential monthly exhibitions afford the private collector and demanding art professional a stimulating museum forum environment to view outstanding art and acquire the most exciting, innovative talent of the present day art world.  

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18 April 2014, 1:54 pm 8ddc2af25ee08c19ea16625f426d1870
<![CDATA[Pharrell Curates at Perrotin, Mana Launches Selling Show, and More]]> Found: call, awarded, award
Pharrell Curates at Perrotin, Mana Launches Selling Show, and More

— Pharrell Curates Perrotin Show: Emmanuel Perrotin has tapped musician Pharrell Williams to curate a show at his new Paris gallery. Titled “G I R L” — also the name of Pharrell’s new album — the show will feature “images of women and of love” by Tracey EminAlex KatzDaniel Arsham, and 29 others. “I’m like a student when I’m with visual artists, I love to learn from them. Artworks teach you how to live and think differently,” Pharrell said. [TAN]

— Mana Launches Selling Show: Jersey City’s Mana Contemporary is launching a new selling show called “Mana Exposition,” which will take place three times a year. Run by Cornell DeWitt, former Pulse fair director, the show claims to be “neither an art fair nor a pop-up gallery.” The first exposition, “All the Best Artists Are my Friends, Part 1,” will take place during Frieze week. [AiA]

— Fairey Among Rubenstein’s Creditors: Court documents recently filed in the Perry Rubenstein gallery bankruptcy case reveal artists Shepard FaireyGeorg Herold, and Zoe Crosher to be among those who the gallery owes money. According to the filing, Fairey is owed $159,000, Crosher is owed $105,000, and Herold is owed $364,000. “The documents are accurate. We’re obliged to file accurate documents,” Rubenstein said. “These are all matters that are being resolved civilly and, hopefully, expeditiously.” [LAT]

— Bristol Takes Banksy: The city of Bristol has seized the Banksy that was previously seized by a youth club in the city. [The Guardian]

— GIF Award Announced: Brooklyn-based creative director Christina Rinaldi’s GIF has won the first ever Motion Photography Prize awarded by Saatchi Gallery and Google+. [CNN]

— Film Follows Master Forger: “Art and Craft,” a film about master forger Father Arthur Scott, debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival this week. [The Daily Beast]

— MoMA will have a retrospective of Robert Gober this October. [NYT]

— Sotheby’s has released an investor update presentation in reaction to Daniel Loeb’s attacks this week. [AMM]

— Pace and Axel Vervoordt are opening Hong Kong outposts timed to debut with Art Basel there. [TAN]

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Check our blog IN THE AIR for breaking news throughout the day.

Pharrell Curates Perrotin Show
Published: April 18, 2014

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18 April 2014, 9:37 am 9be4329b400187119e4a6390d2d2e089
<![CDATA[Bed Down in a Castle at Al Husn, Oman’s Most Luxurious Hotel]]> Found: call, awards, award
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Designed in the style of a Moorish fort, Muscat’s Al Husn and its private beach offer Oman’s most extravagant stay option.

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While the neighboring cities of Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the UAE get most of the attention, Muscat offers perhaps the most authentic experience of the Gulf region, offering history, charm and rugged landscapes from the coast to the inland mountains and deserts.

Designed in the style of a Moorish fort, Muscat’s Al Husn offers the Sultanate of Oman’s most extravagant stay option, tucked away with its private cove and beaches about 20 minutes drive from the capital. Part of the Shangri-La’s Barr Al Jissah Resort & Spa, and directly translated as “The Castle,” its palm trees, water features and Portuguese influenced architecture recall the Alhambra, with views of rugged mountains as a backdrop.

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Oman is the calmer cousin of its commercial neighbors, and Al Husn matches that vibe – luxurious but never ostentatious. It’s actually has two sister hotels, Al Bandar (The Town) and Al Waha (The Oasis), though while both are a short stroll within the same 124 acre grounds, they have a very different feel. Al Husn stands very much on its solid grounds, on a hill overlooking both a sand beach, and a garden beach.

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Al Husn describes itself as embodying “the true essence and mystique of Arabia, steeped in history and myth, from Sinbad the Sailor to the Queen of Sheba.” And from the beautifully curved arches that begin at its entrance, through Persian rugs underfoot and Arabic scents in the air, the atmosphere is indulgent without ever being overpowering.

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180 rooms, each of 48 square meters all include a terrace or balcony, most overlooking the Sea of Oman, of which the hotel claims 600 meters of coastline. The best swimming though is in its picturesque pool, surrounded by palms.

The pool isn’t the only water feature on the property of note though, it also has a horizontal water flume on which to ride a float and slowly meander at the water’s own pace around the property.

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As well as Al Husn’s private cove, ideal for relaxation in front of the dramatic rock formations, it has its own dive center for beginners and professionals, and boats for fishing. Dolphin and whale watching tours are an unexpected service, but the sunset tours are the most popular.

One beach, protected from guests, is used by visiting turtles, who bury their eggs, allowing their young ones to crawl from the sands back into the sea without harm.

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Incredibly, Al Husn and its extended property, including the two sister hotels, has 21 restaurants. No shortage of options means never really needing to leave the premises.

While consistent throughout, and including Lebanese, Italian, Middle Eastern, Indian, Asian and South American, the pick of the bunch is perhaps the Moroccan restaurant Shahrazad. Romantically lit at night, the slow-cooked stew of the specialty Lamb Tajine Tfaya is the top choice, complimented by imported Morrocan wine.

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The hotel first opened seven years ago, and its reputation has only improved with time.  “We are honoured to have received numerous international awards and achieve high recognition in the market,” says General Manager Mark Kirk.

“When combining our delivery of Shangri-La’s legendary hospitality from the heart together with the warm welcome and hospitality of the Omani people, it is an unbeatable combination.”

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Al Husn guests are treated to several special complimentary activities. A large outdoor platform plays host to afternoon tea with cakes, overlooking the main beach area. Then in the evening, pre-dinner cocktails and snacks warm up guests as the sun goes down.

Live music is provided by local musicians on traditional instruments, ensuring an authentic feel to the hotel experience. Then, in-room, complimentary iPods are prepared with a personalised music selection,

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For those looking for pure relaxation, and revitalization Al Husn is prepared with the CHI spa. Ostensibly based on Chinese philosophy, the 12 treatment villas at the spa uses local, naturally grown Omani ingredients, such as frankincense. Frankincense has long been known for its anti-ageing and healing powers and is mixed in to oils and clay for the treatments. It is mixed with rose for a Frankincense and Rose Wrap.

Male and female hammams with steam room and bathing sections are worth a trip just to view the mosaic tiling and fountains alone.

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The atmosphere of Oman is all around at Al Husn, where camels wander the beach with their masters, and an Omani Heritage Village showcasing the country’s history and culture in the grounds. The village is supported by the Bait Al Zubair Foundation and the Omani Craft Authority, which helps to ensure its authenticity, while next door, the Al Mazaar Souk sells local wares.

Art lovers will find particular enjoyment at the Art Gallery, a collaboration with the Bait Al Zubair Museum, which presents rotating local exhibitions, including photographs of Omani culture, by local artists.

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Bed Down in a Castle at Al Husn in Oman
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18 April 2014, 9:36 am 3704b1b45a6ec2b46a80c7514233a262
<![CDATA[Spring Open Studios]]> Found: residence
The International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP) Spring Open Studios is a three-day exhibition of international contemporary art. The 36 artists and curators from 20 countries currently in residence present work in their studios. Open Studios invites the public to 36 "studio visits" to experience art in its place of origin and to share conversations with artists and curators from all over the world. During Open Studios, contemporary art practices in a studio setting will be available to visitors as well as through The Poplar Tree and Mirror, an exhibition of video selected from the research archives of Video Bureau and including work by Li Ming, Zhang Peili, Ma Qiusha, Zhou Tao and Huang Xiaopeng.

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