ArsRSS Calls and Opportunities http://net18reaching.org/artrss/ Current Term Specific News Feed en-us Thu, 31 Jul 2014 13:00:01 -0400 240 <![CDATA[Wie Gand Photography]]> Found: call
Wie Gand have some very creative photography work in their portfolio, these which I guess I'd call 'Urban Detail' photography were my faves:





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19 October 2012, 9:04 am 0118ecf6741925fc82acaeee9a8fd692
<![CDATA[Kansas Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Wichita, Kansas]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$30,000 in cash and purchase awards. Deadline: August 22, 2014

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b190e6251443a58a33ec3137ab593126
<![CDATA[Call for Environmental Sculpture Proposals - Clarksburg, Maryland]]> Found: deadline
$3000 commission. Deadline: August 22, 2014

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deb781a161826803bf0fff95f57cfd48
<![CDATA[2014 Art Hop: Texas Statewide Arts Competition - Georgetown, Texas]]> Found: deadline
$5,750 in cash and prizes. Deadline: August 22, 2014

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24d6e0203485f0a629669e84c24048eb
<![CDATA[81st Annual International Exhibition of Fine Art in Miniature - North Bethesda, Maryland]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000 in awards. Deadline: September 20, 2014

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fcd4e1e92946fefd53d708533592a33c
<![CDATA[Neither Here nor There Photography Exhibit - Cincinnati, Ohio]]> Found: deadline, award
$1000 best of show award. Deadline: August 26, 2014

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71e6a82492a91704da7aabde9bb77247
<![CDATA[National Sculpture Society's Alex J. Ettl Grant]]> Found: deadline
$5,000 prize. Deadline: October 1, 2014

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769835c38c1c223ce4bc333b48e12ff3
<![CDATA[Small Wonders: A Fine Art Small Works Exhibition - Annapolis, Maryland]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 10, 2014

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579325a27ca4b3423e786d5b9ed9b0d3
<![CDATA[CWA 45th National Exhibition - Pleasanton, California]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$12,000 in awards. Deadline: September 5, 2014

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761fd8b144b8cab7b595b4a8df805bc3
<![CDATA[Main Street Arts National Juried Small Works Show - Clifton Springs, New York]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in cash awards. Deadline: September 22, 2014

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5c889e597a0c024c4435bd45c58a73d0
<![CDATA[2014 Osceola Fall Arts Festival - Kissimmee, Florida]]> Found: deadline
$20,000 in prizes. Deadline: September 19, 2014

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f7b95da73851467b8ecd0f7f13a4e558
<![CDATA[The Truth podcast: Eat Cake]]> Found: calls, call
Can coconut cake + random phone calls = love? Find out in our alternative Valentine's Day radio drama from US producer Jonathan Mitchell
Francesca Panetta

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14 February 2011, 10:22 am 196e56db861cfa8df85f0beefe71e779
<![CDATA[The Heckle 02: Mistaken identities]]> Found: awards, award
In the Guardian's daily podcast from Edinburgh, Lucy Porter and Brian Logan mull over mistaken identities with Phill Jupitus and Andre Vincent and comedy bigwigs report on this year's if.comedy awards, plus Phil Nichol.

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7 August 2007, 6:35 am c98463d1678f7b9315b468b8d649985e
<![CDATA[Michael Cloeren - July 22 2014]]> Found: award
Michael Cloeren, award-winning founder & producer of the Pocono Blues Festival, talks about the annual Pennsylvania Blues Festival, taking place July 26-27 at Blue Mountain Ski Resort in Palmerton. For more information, www.skibluemt.com or 610-826-7700

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23 July 2014, 12:00 am 54af3239577bc7f2dbc733cef4149899
<![CDATA[Introduction]]> Found: residency, entry
Dear all:

Happy Summer! My apologies for the extremely late intro. I've been more off
the grid than usual, but now back into the flow of things. I've really
enjoyed reading all of the intros and beginnings to conversations --- this
is looking to be fantastic.

I'll be presenting around a project "Songs for Non-Work," a platform where
thousands of Amazon MTurk workers were paid Silicon Valley minimum wage
(10/hr USD) to not-work in one-minute intervals. Workers also had the
option of recording and contributing audio, which forms a lengthy unedited
soundscape - I've been very interested Dziga Vertov's notion of sound
as a "factory
of facts <http://www.ubu.com/sound/vertov.html>," experimenting with sound
as an entryway into thinking about post-work imaginaries (such as discussed
by Kathi Weeks) and alternative ideas to basic income.

I live in London and am doing a brief residency at the White Building this
summer. If you're interested, there's some more info on my collaborative
and individual projects here <

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10 July 2014, 3:50 pm a21a2beebf5bed4b2746068593db09a4
<![CDATA[Re: Introduction]]> Found: opportunity
TL;DR:
We will run a workshop for prototyping (interface) interventions into (digital) workspaces.

Hi there,
Sorry for postponing my introduction until now, as my contribution to the conference is still a work in progress.
My name is Mushon Zer-Aviv, I’m a designer, an educator and a media activist based in Tel Aviv and previously in New York where I know some of you guys from. Currently I’m teaching digital media at Shenkar School for Design and Engineering and am doing some work on budget transparency in Israel (but enough about me). I have attended the first Digital Labor conference at the New School in 2009 and wrote a paper for Mobility Shifts in 2011.

My design work often attempts to re-politicize interface both as a control mechanism and as an opportunity for agency. I'm researching, writing and designing tools and platforms that attempt to go beyond “User Generated Content” and suggest a more critical approach that could be thought of as “User Generated Interfaces”. For example I am cu

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30 June 2014, 12:08 pm 4acbf378997cd0d43bda6271e69eb4e0
<![CDATA[Re: Introduction]]> Found: call
This will be my second digital labor conference. I'm happy to see how much
the concept has developed over the past five years.

I am presently completing an essay on automation
<http://balkin.blogspot.com/2014/06/a-more-nuanced-view-of-legal-automation.html>,
in response to a call for proposals
<http://canopycanopycanopy.com/contents/2014_commission_recipients> from
Triple Canopy. I edited and wrote for a New Museum-sponsored project on "The
Last Newspaper <http://newcityreader.net/issue08.html>." My book, The Black
Box Society <http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674368279>,
will be published this fall.

My presentation at the conference will explore proposals to "automate the
automators"--i.e., how to computerize (and thus render redundant) the
managers and investors who claim automation should render most workers
redundant.

--Frank


Frank Pasquale
Professor of Law
University of Maryland Carey School of Law
500 W. Baltimore St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410)-706-4820


On Fri, Jun 27, 2014 at 5:06

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30 June 2014, 2:19 am 9d1d28a8d38ef50d8a575d451f84fccb
<![CDATA[Reflections on Music from the New Wilderness: A Dialogue between Ellen Waterman and Tyler Kinnear]]> Found: award

I wonder if in some sense the New Wilderness is this society we live in where comfortable, former boundaries still exist, but they are permeable. They exist in ways that are not settled and have no assurance that they will live on into the future.

-Ellen Waterman, in dialogue with Tyler Kinnear

With the financial support of the Rio Tinto Alcan Performing Arts Award, Music 2014, the Western Front produced Music from the New Wilderness, a production consisting of new compositions that integrate pre-recorded material, including an archival wax cylinder recording and recent field recordings.  Music scholar Ellen Waterman and doctoral student Tyler Kinnear attended the production several times.  At the invitation of DB Boyko (who played a major role as director/curator of Music from the New Wilderness), Ellen and Tyler scheduled time to formally discuss their experiences.  Prior to conversation, they exchanged a series of questions to guide their discussion (see “Questions”).  Topics addressed during the dialogue included stylistic features of works on the program and larger concepts, such as wilderness, technology, and genre.  Tyler created the following audio work using excerpts from the meeting and field recordings he made in Vancouver and on Vancouver Island.  The recordings used in the piece are as follows:

- Dialogue at Ellen’s brother’s house, with Gypsy the dog accompanying us (East Vancouver)

- Tide pool at Third Beach (Stanley Park)

- Boardwalk in Pacific Rim National Park (Vancouver Island)

- At the base of the University Boulevard Water Feature (UBC)

- Contact microphone affixed to Tyler’s apartment window on a rainy day (Kitsilano)

- Garden near the Faculty of Land and Foods Systems (UBC)

 

CLICK HERE for Video Excerpt of the performance of Songs of Love and Despair

 ___________________________________________________

Questions

How might we position these works in relation to a broader history of experimental music?

In what ways do these works engage the concept of wilderness?  (What is “new” here?)

What genre expectations are foiled and/or fulfilled by this concert?

What contextualization does the audience need in order to be let into these works?

Amidst recent demands for expansion here in British Columbia in natural resources export (pipelines, coal terminals, etc.), do these works stimulate discussion around some of the cultural, environmental, and political aspects (perhaps also anxieties) of this moment in BC history?  More directly, can such works raise environmental awareness?

______________________________

Bios

Ellen Waterman is both a music scholar and a flutist specializing in creative improvisation and contemporary music. She is currently Dean of the School of Music at Memorial University of Newfoundland where she also teaches in ethnomusicology.

Tyler Kinnear is a Ph.D. Candidate in Musicology at the University of British Columbia. His research focuses on conceptions of nature in music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

_______________________________

Music from the New Wilderness Program

  • when you’re looking for something, all you can find is yourself (2014)
  • Multi-channel audio
  • Composition: Adam Basanta
  • Interviews, research, and dramaturgy: Jennifer Schine

 

 

  • The Senses of Belonging (2014)
  • Piano, voice, strings
  • Composition/performance: Alicia Hansen
  • String quartet: Peggy Lee, Jean René, Jesse Zubot, Joshua Zubot

 

  • Objects from a Landscore (2014)
  • Multi-channel projection
  • Composition: Christian Calon

 

  • Songs of Love and Despair: The Songs of Therese and the Potato Gardens Band (2014)
  • String quartet and archival recordings
  • Composition: Jesse Zubot
  • String quartet: Peggy Lee, Jean René, Jesse Zubot, Joshua Zubot
  • Visuals: Krista Belle Stewart

 

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21 May 2014, 6:58 pm 3fcb2d2ac149e4103b13b24b3b8692e4
<![CDATA[Living Improvisation: Workshop with Lee Pui Ming]]> Found: call, residence

$10 / FREE Western Front members

Advance registration required. 

To register contact: newmusicadmin@front.bc.ca

Musician-in-Residence with the Sound of Dragon Festival, pianist and composer Lee Pui Ming is recognized for her work in combining contemporary classical, jazz, and traditional Chinese music.

“We improvise all the time. We listen, assess, initiate and respond to what arises within and around us. In this gathering, we will explore more mindfully what we do automatically, and share our individual practices of improvisation. Bring yourself, and bring an instrument if you wish.”

Lee Pui Ming is an artist who is curious about the space where the Known meets the Unknown. Through the years, that exploration has led her to new ways of transforming and integrating Chinese material into her work; creating a live performance gestalt that includes sounding all parts of the piano, engaging her body and her voice; finding fresh ways of weaving tonalities; and diving into the wide expanse of open improvisation. And always, the intent is to communicate and connect with the listener, heart to heart.

In Lee’s performing career, she has played in jazz, new music, and folk festivals in places like Montreal, Ottawa, Vancouver, Toronto, Halifax, Edmonton, White Horse, San Francisco, St. Paul (Minnesota), Honolulu, Berlin, Bern, Worpswede, and Hong Kong. She has been presented by presenters like Honens International Piano Festival in Calgary, Art Gallery of Ontario and The Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Vancouver New Music, and Hong Kong Urban Council. Recently she made concerto appearances performing she comes to shore with The Hopkins Symphony, Windsor Symphony, and The Bay-Atlantic Symphony.

Co-presented by Sound of Dragon: A Festival of Chinese Music.

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27 March 2014, 1:00 pm 6a48af1f2927e6e1f0db314d4c96736f
<![CDATA[Scoring Sound: Vancouver Draw Down Festival]]> Found: residency, residence, entre

Grand Luxe Hall, Western Front

FREE

Have you ever heard a drawing before? Come and draw your own score and hear it played by international pianist Lisa Ullén. Ullén collaborates with artist Kathleen Taylor to guide this hands-on event to create instant graphic scores from drawings and doodles. No experience required.

Scoring Sound is one of forty five FREE drawing workshops for Vancouver Draw Down, an annual event that celebrates creativity. Now in its 5th year, the Vancouver Draw Down is a city-wide day of drawing that challenges commonplace ideas about what drawing is and what it can do. It’s time to spark the right side of your brain and connect with the innovative and imaginative recesses of your mind. This is about process and pleasure, not about technical skill. That’s why everyone -including you- can participate!

___________________________

Stolkholm-based composer and pianist Lisa Ullén visits the Western Front as Musician-In-Residence for the month of June. She is one of the key artists on the Swedish jazz and improvisation scene with several projects and constellations. Lisa has many international collaborations, and has been touring in Europe and the USA. Her latest and long awaited solo album Catachresis was released in May 2011 (NUSCOPE recordings, US). Ullén works in the realms of jazz, experimental, and contemporary music as a pianist, improviser, composer, and arranger. As part of her residency, Ullén will work in collaboration with local musicians and present a solo piano concert.

Kathleen Taylor is an artist and writer based in Vancouver. Focused in drawing that approaches sculpture and painting, her current practice is centered around paper and pathos. She received her BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013, and recently participated in the exhibition “The Hatchery” at Avenue gallery.

Roundhouse Community C<U>entre</U> 

Co-presented with the Roundhouse Community Arts and Recreation Centre and Coastal Jazz & Blues with support from the Swedish Arts Grants Committee

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26 March 2014, 7:51 pm d3883a8d6c2a9dad21a46bc517008c38
<![CDATA[Augment it Yourself (AiY) Deadline: July 1]]> Found: deadline

“Perception, in whatever sensory modality, is the result of the brain’s cartographic skill.” Antonio Dimasio

New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. (NRPA) invites you to propose a hybrid net art project for Turbulence.org - Augment it Yourself (AiY). Projects must use both the World Wide Web and a physical site :: Deadline: July 1, 2014 :: Commission Amount: $6,000 :: Commission Date: July 2015.

  • The behavior of all particles is contingent on the presence of a conscious observer.
  • Our internal and external perceptions are inextricably connected.
  • Reality is the perpetual enfolding/unfolding of autopoiesis (self-making), in relationship with others and our environment.

Augmented Reality (AR) is a real-time experience of a real-world environment whose elements are augmented by computer-generated sensory input — such as video, graphics or sound — and mapped to GPS coordinates. Thus, after downloading an AR ‘app’ to a smartphone and going to the specified location, users are able to experience intertwined realities.

While AR refers to the technologies that make these experiences possible, we are interested in how we have always augmented our realities — with our brains and other reality-mediating technologies — modifying and/or enhancing reality by layering memories on real-time perceptions, for instance. How will your project contribute to perception, memory, and the creation of the autobiographical self?

Required: Proposal (max 500 words), Biography (max 300 words), and URLS of past work.

Email them to turbulence @ turbulence.org with the Subject: Turbulence.org - AiY Proposal.

* Do it Yourself (DiY) empowers individuals to make things without the aid of “experts” or professionals; it is an alternative to consumer culture’s emphasis on relying on others to satisfy ones needs.

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15 June 2014, 7:09 pm c3154f204df2cd4bc65f4083e3c537a5
<![CDATA[Turbulence Commission: “Shadow Play - Tales of Urbanization of China” by Lily & Honglei]]> Found: residency

Turbulence Commission: Shadow Play: Tales of Urbanization of China by Lily & Honglei [Download Second Life for desktop and Layar for mobile devices]

Over the past few decades China has been urbanizing at an astounding pace. In 2013, the People’s Republic unveiled its plan to relocate 260 million people from China’s countryside to one of 21 “mega regions” by 2020 (cbsnews.com). Such a significant shift will undoubtedly transform China’s national character, which has been predominantly agrarian for millennia. Shadow Play weaves three interfaces, Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), and Physical Reality (PR), and combines the past and present — through time-honored imagery, paint, “shadow play,” and new media technologies — to immerse participants in the realities of contemporary China.

Shadow Play: Tales of Urbanization of China is a 2014 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHY

Based in New York and Beijing, Lily & Honglei is an artist collective consisting of Xiying Yang, Honglei Li and He Li. Utilizing traditional painting, video, and new media Lily & Honglei creates ‘visual fables’ which intertwines current social issues with cultural heritage. Their artworks have been presented at numerous international and national venues including Museum of Art and Design in New York, Queens Museum of Art in New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, He Xiangning Art Museum in China, ICA Boston, The Painting Center of New York, Eyebeam Art & Technology Center, Electronic Visualization & Arts at British Computer Society in London, ISEA–Intel Society of Electronic Arts in Istanbul, New York Artist Residency Foundation Gallery, Shanghai University Gallery, MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies, SIGGRAPH 2008, SIGGRAPH Asia 2013, Dumbo Art Festival in New York, among many others.

“Like” us on Facebook:
http://facebook.com/nrpa.org
http://facebook.com/turbulence.org

Follow us on Twitter:
http://twitter.com/turbulenceorg

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3 June 2014, 8:00 pm b459465b6fb0ae916e8769707099cde6
<![CDATA[Augment it Yourself (AiY): Call for Proposals]]> Found: deadline

“Perception, in whatever sensory modality, is the result of the brain’s cartographic skill.” Antonio Dimasio

New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. (NRPA) invites you to propose a hybrid net art project for Turbulence.org - Augment it Yourself (AiY). Projects must use both the World Wide Web and a physical site :: Deadline: July 1, 2014 :: Commission Amount: $6,000 :: Commission Date: July 2015.

  • The behavior of all particles is contingent on the presence of a conscious observer.
  • Our internal and external perceptions are inextricably connected.
  • Reality is the perpetual enfolding/unfolding of autopoiesis (self-making), in relationship with others and our environment.

Augmented Reality (AR) is a real-time experience of a real-world environment whose elements are augmented by computer-generated sensory input — such as video, graphics or sound — and mapped to GPS coordinates. Thus, after downloading an AR ‘app’ to a smartphone and going to the specified location, users are able to experience intertwined realities.

While AR refers to the technologies that make these experiences possible, we are interested in how we have always augmented our realities — with our brains and other reality-mediating technologies — modifying and/or enhancing reality by layering memories on real-time perceptions, for instance. How will your project contribute to perception, memory, and the creation of the autobiographical self?

Required: Proposal (max 500 words), Biography (max 300 words), and URLS of past work.

Email them to turbulence @ turbulence.org with the Subject: Turbulence.org - AiY Proposal.

* Do it Yourself (DiY) empowers individuals to make things without the aid of “experts” or professionals; it is an alternative to consumer culture’s emphasis on relying on others to satisfy ones needs.

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9 May 2014, 12:42 pm 8080436594a247f1d1e9a092b24d5921
<![CDATA[Oscar Tusquets Blanca – The Gaulino Chair]]> Found: award
Oscar T. Blanca, designer (Spanish, b. 1941), B.D. Barcelona Designs, manufacturer Gaulino Armchair, 1987 Indianapolis Museum of Art, Robertine Daniels Art Fund in Memory of Her Late Husband, Richard Monroe Fairbanks Sr., and Her Late Son, Michael Fairbanks, 2013.4

Oscar T. Blanca, designer (Spanish, b. 1941), B.D. Barcelona Designs, manufacturer
Gaulino Armchair, 1987
Indianapolis Museum of Art, Robertine Daniels Art Fund in Memory of Her Late Husband, Richard Monroe Fairbanks Sr., and Her Late Son, Michael Fairbanks, 2013.4

Oscar Tusquets Blanca (who prefers we use both surnames) was born in 1941. The Barcelona native trained as an architect and began working as a designer of furniture and objects in 1972 with BD (Barcelona Design). Since then he has won several award,s including the Spanish National Design Award. Tusquets Blanca designed the Gaulino chair in 1987 and it is a prime example of Spanish design and functional art. Every angle of the Gaulino chair has beautiful complex lines bringing joy to your eyes as you follow along its subtle, sculptural curves. This is the result of his friendship with Salvador Dali and his interests in painting and writing. It seems clear he was also inspired by Antoni Gaudi and Carlo Mollino for which he named the chair.

The Gaulino chair, winner of the 1989 Industrial Design Prize, has a handmade appearance yet it was his first industrial project in wood. Its structure is made of solid ash and is available in a natural varnish, oak stain or black stain. The oak seat can be upholstered in black, natural, or honey leather. It can be stacked, but what a crime that would be! This is a gorgeous piece that I want to sit in, touch, and be close to in order to study every detail. The anamorphic shapes speak to me and fascinate me. I am not surprised to learn that Tusquets Blanca considers this chair one of his best works. The Gaulino chair is now a part of the Design Arts permanent collection at the IMA.

— Marika Klemm, ASID, Marika Designs, LLC

Tusquets Blanca’s Gaulino chair is an inspired mix of masculine and feminine lines. It may be a dining chair but I prefer to see it as a stand-alone chair that exudes an international design ethos of beauty and functionality. At first glance, the Gaulino chair has a masculine stance on the floor that dares you to have a seat. Yet its machismo belies the feminine, almost sensual, lines of the seat and arms which draw you in and seal the deal. Some will use the Gaulino with the matching table. Others will place it in any room as a side chair to add a sophisticated, sublime and lean design element for the occasional aperitif, but I would use it as the ultimate desk chair, in black, at a small writing desk.

— Michael Lubarsky, DAS Member

 

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16 August 2013, 3:21 pm 7caa5db64db9e341c31482c07a46aba4
<![CDATA[Straw Bale Gardening: A How-To Guide]]> Found: jury

1. Start with a bale of Straw.

Bale1

2. Saturate it with water for about 3 days.

Watering a straw bale

3. Sprinkle the top of the bale with 1/2 cup granular nitrogen fertilizer and continue watering, adding 1/2 cup fertilizer for the next 3 days. Then for the next 3 days only add 1/4 cup fertilizer and water.

4. On day 10, begin digging 3 holes in the the top of the bale, a little larger than the plant pot diameter. Then fill the holes with potting soil or compost, or a combination, and water gently.

A straw bale with holes in it

A straw bale with dirt filled in the holes

Be sure to dig your holes slightly larger than the plant pot diameter

5. When the soil is no longer hot to the touch, plant and water gently. Clean gallon milk jugs with their bottoms removed make a good cloche if the temperature drops suddenly!

A planted straw bale with a watering pale

6. Continue watering gently and occasionally add dilute fertilizer or compost tea about once per week. The continued watering will leach the fertilizer out.

A straw bale with plants in it

Advantages to Straw Bale Gardening

  • Easier (raised) for folks with limited mobility
  • Useful if your garden soil is poor
  • Useful if you have little or no soil in which to garden
  • Virtually no weeding (Don’t use hay bales!)
  • Don’t have to rotate crops, use a fresh bale each year
  • At season’s end, provides great compost for rest of garden

Possible Disadvantages to Straw Bale Gardening

  • May look a little messy as the bale decomposes
  • Bales dry out quickly, so ultimately may use too much water…jury is still out on this one

 

 

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5 June 2013, 9:00 am b7dfbe038892baee8e89a874f91645ef
<![CDATA[Emerging artists wanting to participate in the Splendid festival read on...(May 2011)]]> Found: calling, call
Calling creatives of all stripes who have an inquisitive mind, an innovative approach and a desire to collaborate to participate in the 2011 Splendid program.

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20 March 2011, 2:03 pm a0ec52e369c8df0b4b378ef64b241d2e
<![CDATA[Catching up with Chino Otsuka, 2013 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize finalist]]> Found: call, opportunity, residency, awarded, award, entre

Chino Otsuka, <em>Imagine Finding Me</em>, 1975 and 2005, Spain, Japan, 2005, Chromogenic print, 305 mm x 406 mm.</

Chino Otsuka, Imagine Finding Me, 1975 and 2005, Spain, Japan, 2005, Chromogenic print, 305 mm x 406 mm.

Born in Tokyo and educated in the U.K., 2013 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize finalist Chino Otsuka uses photography and video to explore the fluid relationship between memory, photography, and time. She recently completed her residency at the Nikkei National Museum in Burnaby, B.C., which focused on researching Japanese picture brides and their forgotten stories. We caught up with Otsuka to discuss her residency research, work and experience.

AGO: While you were in Vancouver, you worked inside the archives and collection of the Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre. What did your research focus on, and what affect has working in Vancouver had on your work?

Chino Otsuka: The research I conduct is integral to the development of my work. For a while now I have been researching the history of Japanese emigrants. When I found out about the residency component of the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize and was able to choose anywhere in Canada, I knew I wanted to go to the Nikkei National Museum. Since I had previously done similar research on a group of Japanese who went to the Netherlands in the mid-19th century, I wanted to see the museum’s collections and learn more about the history of Japanese-Canadian immigrants.

During the residency I had the opportunity to access and explore museum collections that are not normally seen or easily accessible. I knew very little about the history of Japanese immigrants in Canada, or the hardships and injustice that they suffered. I read and came across so many moving stories. All of this is a very important part of Japanese history, and I’m so surprised that many of these stories are untold outside of Canada.

As my research progressed I became more and more interested in the stories of young women who came over from Japan as a “picture brides,” young Japanese women usually between 17 and 19 years old who came to Canada as in the early 20th century. Their marriages were arranged by showing the prospective bride and groom photographs of each other. Most of these women travelled from Japan and saw their husband-to-be for the first time when they arrived in Canada. I was drawn to their innocence, ambition and courage — their journey. They all longed for a new life in their new country. Yet when they arrived in Canada the life they had imagined was completely different. Hardship and many tragedies would follow them. They struggled and endured so much.

I’ve looked through many photographs and artefacts in the collection and chose to focus especially on their journey to Canada. There is a sense of anticipation around the little moment in their life when they were dreaming about the future. I’ve been working with the old photographs as well as photographing their belongings that they brought with them from Japan.

With your residency now complete, can you speak to the effect that the overall experience has had on your work? Did your work move in a new direction during the residency? If so, how?

The residency has given me a new perspective on my practice, as well as time to explore and experiment with new ideas. The work I started during my residency is not quite finished yet. I’m done with the research and photographing and am now working with these materials through editing and finding ways to present them.

What has the residency allowed you to do in terms of your work and research?

In my work I mainly explore the notion of autobiographical memory, so the residency at the Nikkei National Museum has given me the opportunity to explore and research the history, the collective memory – how the individual memories weave together to tell a story.

In her essay “Chino Otsuka’s Time Machine” Michiko Kasahara writes that your “journeys into the past are not sentimental and do not display a nostalgic atmosphere,” yet much of your work explores issues of duality, history, memory and self. Can you elaborate on/explain your method? Do you agree with the writer’s statement?

I work with the past and many of my works show my past. How I take my works, restage and rework them is really about today, not yesterday.
My works are personal but by carefully selecting the images, and recreating them in the certain ways, I’m trying to engage the viewers’ internal dialogue of their experiences. I hope to make the images/stories resonate and trigger the viewers’ own memories.

Your work, specifically in the series “Imagine Finding Me,” is extremely personal with the subject being your own self and memory. The Aimia | AGO Photography Prize is awarded by public vote. As the subject of the work, what were your thoughts on it being considered in this way?

I visited the AGO during the exhibition while the voting was going on, and when I wandered around the museum strangers came up to tell me that they voted for me. I guess they recognized me from my work, and that was a really strange experience.


*This interview was conducted via email in July 2014 and has been edited for style and brevity.

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29 July 2014, 12:22 pm 3bd46b2e3965663e39e76c1b7bb4c671
<![CDATA[Canadian migrant-rights activist Pablo Muñoz wins WorldPride 2014 National Youth Solidarity art contest]]> Found: jury
WINNER
WINNER
No Walls Between Us, Pablo Munoz, Vancouver (British Colombia)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Round dance on Parliament Hill, Fabric, Acrylic, Sharpie, 2013, Roxanne Martin, Sault Ste. Marie (Ontario)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Sans titre, Matthilde Cing-Mars, Trois-Rivières (Québec)
FINALIST
FINALIST
United, Leo Samilo, Surrey (British Colombia)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Untold truth, Bogdan Salii, Toronto (Ontario)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Complexity, Brianne Walker, Windsor (Ontario)

The Michaëlle Jean Foundation, the AGO and WorldPride Toronto 2014 are delighted to announce the winner of the 4th Wall Youth Solidarity Project online vote.

Selected as winner by more than a thousand Canadians of all ages from across the country, Vancouver-based artist and rights activist Pablo Muñoz receives $1,000 and will work with a seasoned public art practitioner to see his art mounted on the western wall of the AGO.

His work, No Walls Between Us, highlights the unique experiences of migrant and racialized LGBT youth. It was one of six pieces of art chosen by a jury to represent the theme of “Solidarity with Canada’s Two-Spirited and LGBTTIQQ Communities,” in an unprecedented exhibition celebrating WorldPride Toronto 2014.

On view at the AGO between June 22 and Nov. 15, 2014, the Youth Solidarity Exhibition will inspire Canadians to work together to promote safe, inclusive and healthy communities for Two-Spirited and LGBTTIQQ youth throughout the country. The other young artists featured in the exhibition are:

  • Mathilde Cinq-Mars, a multidisciplinary visual and animation artist from Trois-Rivière, Que. who has a BA from the University of Strasbourg;
  • Roxanne Martin, a digital artist from Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., and the great-niece of Cecil Youngfox, a trailblazing Anishinaabe painter and gay rights activist;
  • Bogdan Salii, a passionate visual artist from Toronto, Ont., who recently immigrated to Canada from Ukraine to pursue his dream of transforming his love for art into a lucrative business;
  • Leo Samilo, a nascent artist and recent high school graduate from Surrey, B.C’s Filipino community; and
  • Brianne Walker, a 17-year-old human rights activist from Windsor, Ont., and aspiring visual artist and filmmaker.

This project is actively supported by more than 55 human rights, faith-based, arts, newcomer, Aboriginal and health organizations across Canada. For a full list of project collaborators, click here.

About Pablo Muño
Colombian-born Pablo Muñoz arrived to Canada as a refugee in 2000. Today, he is an accomplished citizen whose artistic work extends from painting, design, performance art and writing, and his community work centers around immigrant and refugee youth issues, intersections of queer and racialized identities, and solidarity with indigenous communities. Over the past year, Pablo worked on the Make it Count campaign — a project that created community dialogues across the province addressing challenges faced by migrant youth. He is currently working as a story editor on a documentary telling the story of queer refugees coming into Canada. He also is a member of the Vancouver Foundation’s Education Granting Committee and the City of Vancouver’s Youth Advisory Committee.

The Youth Solidarity Project is funded in part by StreetARToronto, a program of the City of Toronto, as well as the K.M. Hunter Foundation.

About the 4th Wall program
In theatre, the “fourth wall” is an imaginary screen that creates a virtual separation between actor and spectator. There are many ways to cross the fourth wall and to make the invisible visible. The Michaëlle Jean Foundation chose to do so through the 4th Wall: Make the Invisible Visible program, in collaboration with several prestigious Canadian museums and art galleries. The goal is to invite young creators to break down the invisible walls that create solitudes between individuals and communities across Canada, by opening the doors of our major cultural institutions to emerging creators from marginalized backgrounds. The Foundation offers museum and art gallery space and bursaries to youth from disadvantaged backgrounds, often cut off from museums, so that they can produce original art that conveys their experiences, ideas and challenges. On display for the public to see, their work provokes debate and builds solutions. The first 4th Wall exhibition was launched on Feb. 5, 2014, at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, to mark Black History Month in collaboration with FRO Foundation.

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26 June 2014, 10:51 am ea30053a59b51a2b6d3048cc34f89f16
<![CDATA[Call for applications: An opportunity for Toronto-based MFA photography students]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submit

Are you or do you know a Toronto-based artist who is enrolled in or has recently graduated from an MFA program focusing on photography? If yes, the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize has an opportunity to share.

This August, one of the artists on the yet-to-be-announced shortlist for the 2014 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize will be in Toronto to participate in the Prize’s residency program. Each year, all four artists on the shortlist receive a fully funded, self-directed residency designed to deepen or enrich their respective practices.

credit

credit


The artist is designing a teaching-focused residency that will be open to five Toronto-based artists who are currently enrolled in or recently graduated from an MFA program with a focus on photography. From Aug. 18 to Aug. 29, the five students will work with the artist, both as a group and one-on-one, with the goal of eliciting critical dialogue about each student’s work and potentially producing new work.

There will be three to four group meetings, and the artist will meet with each of the students individually two to three times over the course of the two-week period. The students will work between the visits to develop ideas and/or create new work. Each student will receive a $500 honorarium to support production and expenses during the study period.

Applicants must be currently enrolled in an MFA program in Canada or internationally or have graduated from such a program after Jan. 1, 2013. Applicants must be based in Toronto between Aug. 18 and 29, 2014, and be available for regular meetings and studio visits during this time.

Although the artist’s identity won’t be publicly revealed until the Aug. 13 shortlist announcement, students under consideration for the program will be notified of the artist’s identity before their participation is confirmed.

Applications must include an artist statement, CV and portfolio of as many as 25 images and/or 10 minutes of video work with detailed credit information (title, date, medium, dimensions). Applications to the program are due July 9.

To submit an application or for more information, please contact Sean O’Neill, Manager, Aimia | AGO Photography Prize at sean_oneill@ago.net.

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23 June 2014, 1:29 pm a491661c35ba6532af13776369b282bc
<![CDATA[Listen: Jim Munroe, Mark Connery and Jonathan Mak talk video games and comics]]> Found: residence

Click to play:

Download 81.4 MB MP3

Recorded: March 26, 2014, at the Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 01:29:05

In this podcast, hear AGO artist-in-residence Jim Munroe in conversation with artists Mark Connery, a Toronto-based comic and zine artist, and Jonathan Mak, a Toronto-based game developer, about their work, indie culture and how playfulness factors into their practices.

Jonathan Mak is a Toronto-based game developer working under the title Queasy Games. He recently collaborated with I am Robot and Proud (aka Shaw-Han Liem), a Toronto-based electronic music artist, on Sound Shapes for PS Vita and PlayStation®3. Sound Shapes features music by Beck, Deadmau5 and Jim Guthrie and graphics by Capy, Superbrothers, Pixeljam and Pyramid Attack.

Mark Connery is a Toronto-based producer of comics and zines. He is most known for the mini-comic adventures of Rudy. In addition to his own publications, his work has appeared in many group exhibitions and has been published in Exclaim!, Kiss Machine and in many small-press lit zines in Toronto and Vancouver.

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4 June 2014, 9:00 am 7ecbcd287d321df62d87955f8cbb5ea9
<![CDATA[In memoriam: A tribute to the memory of Lynne Cohen]]> Found: call, residency

The Art Gallery of Ontario shares in the loss of Lynne Cohen, one of Canada’s finest visual artists. Lynne’s remarkable body of work took us to extraordinary, often-foreboding places — places we would be unlikely to encounter in our daily lives, except through her compelling photographs. Her enigmatic, real-world photographs of interior environments, uninhabited by humans, alluded to her sense of wit and irony.

Lynne Cohen, Untitled (Column), 2009. © Lynne Cohen, 2010.

Lynne Cohen, Untitled (Column), 2009. © Lynne Cohen, 2010.

An internationally collected artist, Lynne was nominated for the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize (then called the Grange Prize) in 2009, and the AGO is proud to have exhibited her work alongside the nominees from Canada and Mexico. Lynne spent her Prize-sponsored residency in Mexico, inspired by interior spaces that became new installations of extraordinary photographs.

Lynne’s legacy will be remembered by all who admired her vision, dedication to students, loyalty to those who knew her and her incredible strength the past three years. Our deepest condolences to Andrews Lugg, her partner of 50 years, who was closest to Lynne in every way.

— Maia Sutnik, Curator, Special Photography Projects at the AGO

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15 May 2014, 1:48 pm e22ff6e59039f8515b186e701816c618
<![CDATA[Computational Fashion Master Class: Call for Participants]]> Found: call
Hours: 
Mon-Fri, 4-8pm; Sat-Sun, 10am-6pm
Cost: 
$1500 ($800 Students/Recent Grads)
Venue: 
NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering (MAGNET)
Eyebeam Programming?: 
Eyebeam
Thumbnail
Image: 3D printed garment by Sabina Sagadiyeva printed with Shapeways. Credit: Amber De Vos for Patrick McMullan

APPLICATION NOW CLOSED

Eyebeam and Shapeways are pleased to announce the first Computational Fashion Master Class. In this ten-day intensive course, participants will:

read more

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6 May 2014, 3:04 pm c283db01273a861f529fa0f54319fe21
<![CDATA[Computational Fashion Master Class: Call for Participants]]> Found: calls, call
Activity Details
Call Type: 
Collaboration
Start Date: 
07/18/2014
Time Commitment: 
July 18-26, 2014
On-site: 
On Site
Call Details
events
05/06/2014 - 06/25/2014
Status: 
Current

Computational Fashion Master Class
July 18-26, 2014


Mon-Fri, 4-8pm
Sat-Sun, 10am-6pm
Tuition Cost: $1500 ($800 Students/Recent Grads)

APPLY NOW

Eyebeam and Shapeways are pleased to announce the first Computational Fashion Master Class. In this ten-day intensive course, participants will:

read more

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6 May 2014, 2:53 pm dfb65e457a9a52c4fe8a3620fd56adfc
<![CDATA[Communications Director]]> Found: calls, call, residence
Activity Details
Call Type: 
Job
Start Date: 
09/17/2012
Time Commitment: 
3 days/wk
On-site: 
On Site
Call Details
get involved
09/04/2012 - 09/16/2012
Status: 
Current

Eyebeam Art + Technology Center is looking for a part time (3 days/week) Communications Director to start August 1. Eyebeam Art + Technology Center is the nation's leading center for art and technology, offering artists and creative technologists paid residences in its Chelsea facility, in addition to a wide range of public programs.  

We are looking for a creative self-starter who can work closely with our staff and artists to tell the Eyebeam story. The candidate should be able to engage with audiences through both traditional and social media. Great writing skills, a good design sense, an ability to think strategically, and a collaborative approach are essential.  

Other criteria include: 

Contact E-mail: 

read more

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13 June 2012, 5:20 pm 214843703e12e61d1f6be9700733cfa8
<![CDATA[Eyebeam 2012 Fall / Winter Residency Call]]> Found: calls, call, residency, deadline
Activity Details
Call Type: 
Residency
Start Date: 
09/17/2012
On-site: 
On Site
Call Details
get involved - residencies
05/24/2012 - 06/22/2012
Status: 
Current

FALL/WINTER 2012 RESIDENCY CALL

APPLICATION DEADLINE: All applications must have been received via online application by 12:00PM (noon) June 22, 2012. All applicants will be informed of their application status by August 13, 2012.

read more

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23 May 2012, 10:43 am b268b68f90324b4c9dd68ec706372f66
<![CDATA[Eye To Eyebeam]]> Found: opportunity

Eye To Eyebeam is a series on Eyebeam's residents and fellows. It includes interviews, photos, and other news and is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro. These interactive posts offer visitors the opportunity to learn more about Eyebeam's diverse community of creative practitioners.

Each week, you'll see interviews profiling individual Eyebeamers. Artists who have already engaged in conversation about their projects include:

Project Created: 
September 2011

read more

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11 October 2011, 12:43 pm a2a09a3ef20e97c75d80e1253a23818e
<![CDATA[Lowry Art Trickery?]]> Found: calls, call
Wigan Today reports that an art lover from Cheshire accused of tricking a dealer into buying a fake LS Lowry has told a court he thought the painting was genuine. Maurice Taylor - who calls himself Lord Taylor Windsor after buying the title on the internet for £1,000 - sold the Mill Street scene to businessman David Smith during a meeting in a Ritz hotel room in 2007. Mr Smith, managing director of Neptune Fine Arts, paid over £230,000 before discovering the work was bogus. Taylor, 60, who lives in a mansion near Congleton, had bought the snowy scene featuring matchstick-style figures three years earlier through friend and Lowry expert Ivan Aird. Mr Aird acted as an agent for the previous owner Martin Heaps who, the crown say, sold the picture for £7,500 with an invoice describing it as "After Lowry" because it was created by artist Arthur Delaney. Prosecuting at Chester Crown Court, Sion Ap Mihangel, said Taylor knew the picture was fake, invented history to boost its provenance, and doctored the invoice so it appeared he was sold a genuine work. Taylor admitted telling his buyer and auctioneers Bonhams he bought the painting several decades earlier from industrialist Eddie Rosenfeld. He said he did not know why he lied but claimed Mr Aird asked him not to say he bought the painting through him. He said Mr Aird told him the painting was genuine and said: "When he sold me that picture there was never a question in his mind. I didn't question him, he told me it was original." A team of experts from Bonhams later assessed the work and were taken in by it. They provided a £600,000 insurance valuation and laid on the red carpet treatment, hoping Taylor would sell it through them. Mr Mihangel said Taylor acquired the Bonhams valuation to strengthen his selling position and to ensure a private sale. Taylor denies denies six counts of fraud and one of forging an invoice. The trial continues. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

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3 March 2009, 2:23 pm 742b0215e6c8dc96600e8ca9f935efd4
<![CDATA[Caged Art Recognised]]> Found: awarded, award
The New York Times reports that 1974 Tehching Hsieh, a young Taiwanese performance artist working as a seaman, walked down the gangplank of an oil tanker docked in the Delaware River and slipped into the United States. His destination: Manhattan, center of the art world. Once there, though, Mr. Hsieh found himself ensnared in the benumbing life of an illegal immigrant. With the downtown art scene vibrating around him, he eked out a living at Chinese restaurants and construction jobs, feeling alien, alienated and creatively barren until it came to him: He could turn his isolation into art. Inside an unfinished loft, he could build himself a beautiful cage, shave his head, stencil his name onto a uniform and lock himself away for a year. Thirty years later Mr. Hsieh’s “Cage Piece” is on display at the Museum of Modern Art as the inaugural installation in a series on performance art. But formal recognition of Mr. Hsieh (pronounced shay), who is now a 58-year-old American citizen with spiky salt-and-pepper hair, has been a long time coming. For decades he was almost an urban legend, his harrowing performances — the year he punched a time clock hourly, the year he lived on the streets, the year he spent tethered by a rope to a female artist — kept alive by talk. This winter, owing to renewed interest in performance art, new passion for contemporary Chinese art and the coinciding interests of several curators, Mr. Hsieh’s moment of recognition has arrived from many directions at once. The one-man show at MoMA runs through May 18. The Guggenheim is featuring his time-clock piece in “The Third Mind: American Artists Contemplate Asia, 1860-1989” through April 19. M.I.T. Press is about to release “Out of Now,” a large-format book devoted to his “lifeworks.” And United States Artists, an advocacy organization, has awarded Mr. Hsieh $50,000, his first grant. He is gratified by the exhibitions. But he judges the book, which is 384 pages and weighs almost six pounds, to be the definitive ode to his artistic career. “Because of this book I can die tomorrow,” said Mr.Hsieh. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

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1 March 2009, 5:44 am fd7169cf5c1136b48458b08bac45ae05
<![CDATA["Nazi" Picasso's Stay In NY]]> Found: jury
Time/CNN reports that it may have been possible for Picasso's boy to lead that horse without a rein, but it appears that the Museum of Modern Art didn't have the famous painting on as tight a leash as you might have thought. For more than a year that 1906 picture, one of the high points of MoMA's art collection, has been the focus of a Holocaust restitution fight that also involved another Picasso, Le Moulin de la Galette, this one hanging at the Guggenheim. Yesterday both museums settled out of court with three plaintiffs seeking return of the paintings, which they claim had been relinquished under duress by their Jewish owner in the 1930s. As with most settlements the details of this one are sealed, so we may never know whether or how much money changed hands. And by itself the mere fact that the two art museums chose to settle doesn't mean they didn't have faith in their own arguments. (Or, for that matter, that the plaintiffs didn't have faith in their's.) But jury trials are a crapshoot and for the museums at least, the paintings were too important to lose. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

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10 February 2009, 4:42 am bc8182e962bd4b6e9594ac931c5d7831
<![CDATA[Joe Boyle's Art at Waterfront Hall, Belfast]]> Found: call, opportunity
There is a small number of artists that savvy Irish Art collectors should carefully track in 2009 - and Joe Boyle (a previous Conor Prize Winner at the Royal Ulster Academy) - is one of them. This Belfast Waterfront exhibition fuses three themes. The first is Boyle's response to a trip to China investigating 17th century dry brush calligraphy combined with Chinese contemporary aspiration for a western iconography. The second is the notion that the fragment can intentionally signify the whole - as part of an ancient object may be considered a work of art - despite that not being the original artistic intention. In this exploration Boyle chooses the Eye as the part that signifies the whole in a meaningful manner - presenting an opportunity to explore different ways of seeing aspects of change in Irish Society. The final theme is a response to Landscape which employs notions of metaphor, edge and parameter to explore emotions which we experience and are challenged by what is often a familiar and sometimes threatening environment. Joe Boyle - Solo Gallery 2 Waterfront Hall 2 Lanyon Place, Belfast Tel: 028 9033 4400 Opens Tuesday 3rd February (7pm- 9pm) until 27th February 2009 Irish Art

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25 January 2009, 5:10 pm 4b446c25110586cb155c74a9f1c63bcf
<![CDATA[Irish Art Thieves Took Taxi]]> Found: residence
Bungling Irish art thieves led Gardai to their door last weekend when they brought their loot home in a taxicab. Two men were apprehended at a residence in Kilmore following the theft of three paintings. It is believed that the thieves were easily located after they hired a taxi to ferry them, and two of the paintings home following the robbery. According to Gardai a plate glass window in Greenacres was smashed and paintings removed from the display. Gardai this week said that while investigations into the matter are 'not yet complete', they are 'not looking for anyone else in connection with the matter'. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

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10 November 2008, 12:43 am 8b31fd7fd4d3a323e3af8af918d320de
<![CDATA[Gaza crisis: Israel calls up reservists as it maintains offensive - live coverage]]> Found: calls, call
  • Killing of sleeping children at school is a disgrace - UN
  • IDF calls up 16,000 more reservists
  • Military says it struck 110 terror sites in past 24 hours
  • US confirms it has restocked Israels ammunition
  • Netanyahu vows to complete destruction of tunnels
  • More than 140 rockets fired from Gaza in past 24 hours - IDF
Continue reading...

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31 July 2014, 7:27 am 53909f243245864998fd442b05cff959
<![CDATA[Morrissey denies claim that he asked bodyguard to 'hurt' fan]]> Found: calling, call

Singer has reportedly taken legal action against a former bodyguard, after Bradley Steyn alleged his employer had asked him to hurt fansite editor

Morrissey has denied an allegation that he asked one of his bodyguards, Bradley Steyn, to find and hurt the webmaster of a major Morrissey fan website. Calling the story, originally published on gossip website TMZ a vexatious lie, Morrissey threatened legal action and claimed the matter is in the hands of Los Angeles police.

Steyns purported claims were first published by TMZ, who stated that Steyn is suing his former employer. According to Steyn, Morrissey hated the guy who ran Morrissey-solo.com, which he felt invaded his personal life, they wrote. Steyn also claims that Morrissey allegedly asked if there was a way the fan could get hurt, and his tour manager enquired if the fan could be gotten rid of. Steyn claims that after he rejected the overture, he was sacked.

On Wednesday, Morrissey responded with a statement on the website True to You. Although he acknowledged that Steyn has worked for him, and that he dislikes Morrissey-Solo, he rejected the alleged plot as an extortion scheme and also said that he had zero personal involvement with the bodyguard. The very idea that I would ask a complete stranger (Bradley Steyn) to physically attack [Morrissey-Solo webmaster] David Tseng surely cannot register with any sane person as being likely, the singer wrote. As mildly irritating as David Tseng may be, he is not someone who troubles me enough to even bother with.

Tsengs name was not part of TMZs original story, but Morrissey chose to name the webmaster in his post. The star has been warring with Tsengs site for years wearing a FUCK MORRISSEY-SOLO.COM T-shirt on stage and referring to the page as SoLow. According to Morrisseys statement, he believes that all of the opinions posted on [Morrissey-Solo.com] are controlled or written by David Tseng, and that David Tseng will give maximum and in-exhaustive publicity to anything said in the negative about me.

Over at Morrissey-Solo, the singers fans and critics greeted this news with sadness, bemusement and disbelief. Apparently Morrissey doesnt understand the nature of online forums and message boards, one wrote. While owned and moderated by Tseng, the site is peopled by hundreds of individual, often cranky, posters. Today, we are all David Tseng, someone quipped. Great exposure for Morrissey-Solo! added another.

Earlier this year, Morrissey cancelled an entire scheduled tour due to a respiratory infection he claimed to have caught from tour opener Kristeen Young. Young replied that she [would not] tolerate these lies, insisting that she had only been suffering from allergies.

World Peace Is None of Your Business, Morrisseys first album in five years, was released in July. It is currently at No 12. Continue reading...

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31 July 2014, 6:14 am 17fcc21abbd8dfc87a9af236dc1deae2
<![CDATA[Fifty Shades of Grey leaves out all the joy of BDSM]]> Found: submit
As a professional dominatrix, I tie people up, spank them or humiliate them. Their joy is to submit to me; mine is the power rush of that control

Women like sex. Stop making health excuses for birth control Continue reading...

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31 July 2014, 4:27 am a0d45482da23a8bd3d152312c34185ec
<![CDATA[Gaza: Israel calls up more reservists after rejecting calls for ceasefire]]> Found: calls, calling, call
Official says move will allow Israel Defence Forces to expand attacks against Hamas and the other terror organisations

Israel has said it is calling up another 16,000 reserves following a security cabinet meeting that decided to keep up military operations in Gaza, ignoring international pressure for an immediate ceasefire.

The move will allow the Israeli military to substantially widen its 23-day campaign against Hamas, which has already claimed more than 1,360 Palestinian lives most of them civilians and reduced entire Gaza neighbourhoods to rubble. Fifty-six Israeli soldiers and three Israeli civilians have died during the campaign. Continue reading...

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31 July 2014, 3:57 am 43226fcf08c0b75738266305ea23f2e7
<![CDATA[Austerity has hit women, ethnic minorities and the disabled most]]> Found: calls, call
Our analysis of the effect of changes to tax and welfare will hopefully introduce more transparency into policymaking

Who has been hit hardest by austerity? When it comes to income levels, the story is reasonably clear, if nuanced. Analysis by the Treasury suggests the impact of changes to taxes and benefits has been broadly regressive. The more you earn, the less youve lost as a proportion of your income, except for top earners, who have been hit relatively harder. This isnt surprising benefit cuts and VAT rises have hit the poor, income tax cuts have helped the middle and upper middle, while pension changes and child benefit withdrawal have affected the richest.

But its not just about income. Inevitably, tax and spending decisions affect different groups women, men, disabled differently. But the Treasury has never published any analysis of the cumulative impact of changes to tax and spending on these groups. Meanwhile, the Department for Work and Pensions has persistently rebuffed calls from disabled peoples organisations, not to mention the independent Social Security Advisory Committee, for an assessment of the impact of welfare changes on the disabled. Continue reading...

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31 July 2014, 3:53 am d8ab81c04a3bcecf4b41fa87d7b3d995
<![CDATA[Phil Wang: Impossibly wise or offensively stupid Chinese people in US films]]> Found: call
Hollywood only has two modes of East Asian character: Mr Miyagi or babbling madman. Why can't we be boring too?

More coverage of the Edinburgh festival 2014

I'm a little obsessed with how East Asian people are presented in the media. If one pops up on TV or in a film, I wait to see if the representation is offensive or patronising or ignorant which it too often is. If it isn't, I give everyone a sage nod and we continue with our evening. If it is, however, I log it into a corner of my mind I like to call the "Anger Zone", for future reference.

One pattern that began to emerge in the Anger Zone was that, as far back as I could remember, whenever a Chinese person appeared on a screen, they were either a Mr Miyagi-esque caricature of wisdom and calm or a babbling, embarrassing lunatic screaming in an incomprehensible accent at the maverick cops who just drove through his fruit stand. They are never just normal, recognisable, functional members of society. Why is that so much to ask, Hollywood? Why can't we be boring too? Continue reading...

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31 July 2014, 3:00 am 7f0324c169fe6012787612a925d55597
<![CDATA[Why I'd like to be Cary Grant in Charade]]> Found: opportunity
Gentlemanly and intelligent with a hint of vulnerability, the Cary Grant of Charade is the perfect version of the great man himself

Why I'd like to be Gregory Peck in To Kill a Mockingbird
Why I'd like to be Julie Christie in Billy Liar
Why I'd like to be Patrick Fugit in Almost Famous

Seriously? This series has got to instalment 6,485 and no one, not one person, has chosen Cary Grant? That the qualities of cinema's leading man solicit nothing more than a ¯\_("/)_/¯ from the internet generation (and Xan Brooks) is a dispiriting indictment. It's also, however, an opportunity. An opportunity for me. An opportunity to have my name published next to Grant's on a piece of search engine optimised content. This means the next time somebody idly asks Google for the identity of the contemporary equivalent of the man born Archibald Alexander Leach, I'm right in there. Probably behind Hugh Grant, but definitely ahead of Joey Essex.

I would like to be all Cary Grants, all the time, but the Cary Grant I have chosen is the one I have watched most recently, the Cary Grant of Charade. It's a late Grant. He was 59 when it came out in 1963, and made only two more films before his death. He stars as Peter Joshua, an American in Paris fascinated by Audrey Hepburn's widow Reggie Lampert. Or maybe it's her money he's after? Clue: it's the money. Or is it? Continue reading...

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31 July 2014, 2:35 am 6ce85bd8f89c3133c06dfb8c52125118
<![CDATA[Western liberations are grotesque experiments just look at Libya]]> Found: calling, call

I feel like Ive been writing the same column for over a decade: humanitarian interventions by the west end up destroying the countries they try to save

Libya was sold as a glorious, liberating war. Londons Tory mayor Boris Johnson wrote in March 2011 that the overthrow of dictator Muammar Gaddafi was of course a good idea. He was cautiously optimistic that a Western-led military campaign would not be a disaster like Iraq in 2003. What kind of democracy do we hope will bloom in the desert soil, after decades in which political parties have been banned? he mused.

Johnson was joined by a host of world leaders, journalists and humanitarian interventionists calling for overwhelming firepower to be deployed against the Libyan army. The western-backed Misrata militias killed Gaddafi and optimism about Libyas future was in the air. The subject of Libya and the left was much-canvassed, including by Australian writer Guy Rundle, who wrote:

For my money once a request was made for support [from Libyan rebels], and in explicit terms, honouring it was simply delivering on an implicit promise made by the notion of international solidarity. Continue reading...

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30 July 2014, 9:42 pm 4a015ffc75d8b57b82b8a9a5aa08d8d7
<![CDATA[The decay of women is obsessively charted. Now men are finding out how it feels]]> Found: opportunity
I am all for equal-opportunity desire, but I have no wish for men to be subjected to the same pressures as women

More from Suzanne Moore Continue reading...

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30 July 2014, 3:00 pm dcb8af7b2ed98575507b672630cfc5da
<![CDATA[Where does your waistband sit on the Trouser Index?]]> Found: calling, call

On the catwalk, waistbands for men are moving up, while one US city is banning sagging trews. Were calling it the Trouser Index - but how low, or high, do you go?

Ocala city in Florida has just announced a ban on sagging pants in public. First-time offenders will receive a warning; multiple-offenders could face up to six months in prison and a $500 fine.

The ban was non-gender specific, but it raises a point little spoken of since the dawn of Dickies-wearing builders and and Lil Wayne, that people are still wearing their trousers so low that one US city council feels the need to ban the practice. Continue reading...

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30 July 2014, 12:53 pm a9ba298c4a2b93b836662dea7b6fa2ee
<![CDATA['Poor doors': not the worst thing about social housing]]> Found: award
Separate entrances are nothing new, and the truth is that social housing providers demand them. Oliver Wainwright on why we need to think outside the apartment block to solve this modern-day apartheid

"We are not snobs," declares a prim housewife on a 1930s newsreel, stiffly posed on her doorstep, flanked by windows hung with neat net curtains. "But we do not wish our streets to become a perfect bedlam." The camera pans to reveal a 7-foot-high brick wall a stone's throw from her door, built right across the street and topped with iron spikes. It was installed in 1934 by the residents of a North Oxford estate to protect their homes from council tenants, who had recently moved into houses nearby as the result of slum clearance. The Cutteslowe walls were deemed illegal and finally demolished in 1959, but their descendants live on in new segregated communities, with their separate entrances and divided facilities, as a Guardian investigation revealed this week.

This divisive tendency is now embodied in its most extreme form in London's slick developments on the City fringe, such as One Commercial Street, a glassy behemoth near Aldgate that has already been nominated for the Carbuncle Cup, the award for the ugliest building of the year. Here, in a modern-day reenactment of North Oxford's apartheid wall, the entrance for lower-income tenants is banished to an alley near the bins, while residents of the luxury private units enjoy a marble-lined, concierge-tended lobby at the front. Continue reading...

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30 July 2014, 10:09 am bb8c0776451a10739ac02addb48c9f73
<![CDATA[Ukraine rebel chief Igor Bezler threatens to execute interviewer]]> Found: call

Nicknamed the Demon, leader said to be behind MH17 crash ends rare interview after exploding into a rage and shouting: Dont think I wont shoot you

With a walrus moustache, a fiery temper and a reputation for brutality, Igor Bezler is the most feared of all the rebel leaders in eastern Ukraine. Nicknamed Bes, or the Demon, he is regarded as something of a loose cannon, even by other rebels, who speak about him in hushed tones. If the Ukrainian security services, the SBU, are to be believed, the Demon and a group of his men were responsible for shooting down Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 over the region a fortnight ago.

According to the recording of a phone call allegedly made two minutes before the disaster, the Demon was told: A bird is flying towards you. He asked whether it was small or big, and was told that it was hard to see, as it was flying high above the clouds. In another recording, apparently made 20 minutes later, the Demon reported to his interlocutor, supposedly a Russian intelligence official, that a plane had been shot down. Bezler said the recording was real, but referred to a different incident: as well as allegedly bringing down MH17, the rebels have shot down 10 Ukrainian aircraft. Continue reading...

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29 July 2014, 6:59 pm 219cd51722d5ffa2a2614bf9998d32b4
<![CDATA[V&A CultureCast: July 2006 (enhanced with images)]]> Found: residence
The July 2006 edition of CultureCast features design historian David Crowley discussing the image of Che Guevara within the context of 1960s culture and politics. It also has an extract from a tapestry gallery talk given by Sue Lawty, V& A artist in residence and an article about the cast of the Portico de la Gloria in the Cast Courts.

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10 July 2006, 5:00 am fcc19779ff82a9ae2204dc9125804c34
<![CDATA[V&A CultureCast: July 2006 (no images)]]> Found: residence
The July 2006 edition of CultureCast features design historian David Crowley discussing the image of Che Guevara within the context of 1960s culture and politics. It also has an extract from a tapestry gallery talk given by Sue Lawty, V& A artist in residence and an article about the cast of the Portico de la Gloria in the Cast Courts.

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10 July 2006, 5:00 am 7f45194f7191090b5a3e8a16ef4292f4
<![CDATA[Geisai #20 Silver Grand Prize Winner - Tanpaku-shitsu]]> Found: award

poster for Geisai #20 Silver Grand Prize Winner - Tanpaku-shitsu
Geisai #20 Silver Grand Prize Winner - Tanpaku-shitsu
at Hidari Zingaro (Musashino, Tama area)
(2014-07-31 - 2014-08-05)

Presenting the work of silver grand prize award winner of the May Gesai#20 event.

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<![CDATA[Ryuki Yamamoto Exhibition]]> Found: residence

poster for Ryuki Yamamoto Exhibition
Ryuki Yamamoto Exhibition
at Mizuma Art Gallery - Ichigaya Tamachi (Ichigaya, Kagurazaka area)
(2014-07-23 - 2014-08-30)

With his overwhelming power of composition and cutting self-portraits Ryuki Yamamoto has continued to gain international attention for his powerful paintings. In 2011 he joined a residence program in Beijing with the support of the Pola Foundation and here in this exhibition presents 1 work created during this period and 1 work produced since, both of an impressively large scale. Here he combines spirits, gods and mythical figures with countless images of himself dressed in school uniform in a never ending process of chaos and birth.

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<![CDATA[Mission [Space X Art] -Beyond Cosmologies]]> Found: opportunity

poster for Mission [Space X Art] -Beyond Cosmologies
Mission [Space X Art] -Beyond Cosmologies
at Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (Kiyosumi, Ryogoku area)
(2014-06-07 - 2014-08-31)

In the second decade of the twenty-first century both outer space, into which research and development progresses, and artists’ expressions of inner space are rapidly expanding/converging to constitute a parallel world. Coinciding with the 2014 space boom, this exhibition examines how outer space has been drawn infinitely closer to our daily lives, along with the inner space created by artists as a multiverse, surpassing individual cosmologies. Japan joined the exploration space after the war, and the since this time artists have also come to interpret our steps into the universe through their own particular expressions. This exhibition will present art installations; items connected with space exploration, such as parts of satellites and rockets (fairings); documents from the world of entertainment, such as literature, manga and anime; interactive exhibits; discussions and other events to explore the new possibilities that ‘reflect the expanding/converging world’. It will offer the opportunity to experience and consider ‘space’, not only as some different world or Utopia, but also as something that is ‘ordinary’ in a true sense. [Related Event] Shintaro Tanikawa Book Reading “The Next Universe” Date: June 29(Sun) 14:00-15:30 Venue: B2F Auditorium

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<![CDATA[In Search of Modigliani— From the Avant-Garde to Classicalism]]> Found: opportunity

poster for In Search of Modigliani— From the Avant-Garde to Classicalism
In Search of Modigliani— From the Avant-Garde to Classicalism
at Pola Museum of Art (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2014-04-12 - 2014-09-15)

Born in Livorno, Italy, the painter and sculptor Amedeo Modigliani (1884–1920) lived a short but storied life, producing art in a unique style that continues to strike viewers with its vividness. While Modigliani has long been considered a representative of the School of Paris, in the past century there has been a growing movement to reexamine his work on its own merits. With a similar awareness, the primary aim of this exhibition is to reconsider the meaning of the work left by an artist often said to be in a class by himself, while also shedding light on Modigliani’s era and artistic environment. Tracing the first fifteen years or so of the 20th century, a time when artistic and aesthetic values underwent dizzying changes, it explores to what extent Modigliani’s art was a subject of its times and to what extent it focuses on unchanging elements. Art from early in Modigliani’s career through his stay in southern France is presented along with works contemporaries who influenced or interacted with Modigliani, revealing his development as an artist. [Image: Amedeo Modigliani “Reclining Nude With Loose Hair” (1917)] [Related Event] 130 Years of Modigliani - A 3 Day Festival of Celebrations Dates: July 25-27 An opportunity to join a host of workshops, concerts, gallery talks hand games in the discovery of Modigliani. Also including a lecture from Italian art expert Kikuro Miyashita.

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<![CDATA[Depicting the Indelible Japanese Landscape: Hiroshige’s “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido” and Contemporary Artists]]> Found: opportunity

poster for Depicting the Indelible Japanese Landscape: Hiroshige’s “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido” and Contemporary Artists
Depicting the Indelible Japanese Landscape: Hiroshige’s “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido” and Contemporary Artists
at Bernard Buffet Museum (Greater Tokyo area)
(2014-07-19 - 2014-09-28)

The Musée Bernard Buffet is holding an exhibition of the Hoeido edition of “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido” by the ukiyo-e master Hiroshige Utagawa (1797-1858) and works by contemporary artists who have been inspired by him. The Hoeido edition of “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido,” regarded as the artist’s ultimate masterpiece, presents scenes along the highway as they change over the seasons and over time with abundant lyricism. The prints in this series are also known for the rich variety with which Utagawa depicts the human figure in the landscapes at each location. The world these prints creates, abounding in its rich sense of humanity, continues to capture the hearts of artists today. Leiko Ikemura (1951- ) is an artist who lives and works in Europe, where she continues her fundamental questioning of human existence. After the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, she began engaging in a dialogue with Hiroshige’s “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido,” which could be said to depict the essential, primordial landscapes of Japan. That experience has led to her creating poems and a new series of drawings. Samurai warriors coexist with contemporary individuals in the Yamato-e style miniatures of Akira Yamaguchi (1969- ). In them, Yamaguchi engages in a dialogue with styles from the past while humorously applying the spirit of modern criticism. Yamaguchi creates new landscapes based on places that have caught his eye in the Mishima area, such as the Mishima Taisha and other shrines, expressed through his own interpretations of them. “Hiroshige is my hero!” says Kazuyuki Takezaki (1976- ). Staying in the Mishima area, he has become enthralled with the landscapes along the Genpe and Kakita rivers and has created paintings and built installations inspired by phenomena he has observed there. This exhibition is an opportunity to rediscover the fascination of Utagawa’s “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido,” to experience the work of several contemporary artists, and to contemplate the indelible, essential landscapes within each of us. [Related Event] Workshop “Let’s Make a Landscape with Takezaki-san!” Date: Jul. 21 (Mon, public holiday) 13:00–15:30 Participants: 18 (Young children through Junior High Students) Admission: ¥1000 Please see the venue’s website for reservations, details, and information on more related events.

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<![CDATA[2D Work Award Winners Exhibition]]> Found: award

2D Work Award Winners Exhibition
at Tokyo Wonder Wall (Shinjuku area)
(2013-10-10 - 2014-09-29)

12 artists selected for the Wonder Wall Award from 479 competitors present their work in a relay of solo exhibitions held between October 2013 - September 2014, with an artist talk held each month. Exhibition Schedule Chie Sannami Exhibition Period: 10th October-31st October Opening Talk: 10th October 17:30-18:30 Issei Nishimura Exhibition Period: 7th November-28th November Tsuyoshi Matsunami Exhibition Period: 5th December-26th December Opening Talk: 5th December 17:30-18:30 Mayu Hirota Exhibition Period: 9th January-30th Janurary Opening Talk: 9th January 17:30-18:30 Momi Abe Exhibition Period: 6th February- 27th February Opening Talk: 6th February 17:30-18:30 Shizuka Mitsui Exhibition Period: 6th March-28th March Opening Talk: 6th March 17:30-18:30 Eijiro Saito Exhibition Period: 10th April-30th April Opening Talk: 10th April 17:30-18:30 Saiko Kasajima Exhibition Period: 8th May-29th May Opening Talk: 8th May 17:30-18:30 Hiroaki Ito Exhibition Period: 5th June-26th June Opening Talk: 5th June 17:30-18:30 Narumi Sasaki Exhibition Period: 3rd July-25th July Opening Talk: 3rd July 17:30-18:30 Nanako Mukai Exhibition Period: 7th August-28th August Opening Talk: 7th August 17:30-18:30 Shiro Ishibashi Exhibition Period: 4th September-29th September Gallery Talk: 11th September 12:15-13:00

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<![CDATA[“Art as a Haven of Happiness”]]> Found: calls, call

poster for “Art as a Haven of Happiness”
“Art as a Haven of Happiness”
at Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2014-07-26 - 2014-10-08)

At the art studios “Atelier Element Present” (Mie and Tokyo) and “Shobu Gakuen” (Kagoshima), people born with Down syndrome and other developmental disabilities are daily producing artworks that evince rich sensibilities and intellectual insight. Their world of jewel-like colors, full of bright, festive energy, easily calls the words “happiness” and “harmony” to mind. Their creative approach—light in spirit and as natural as breathing—seems to epitomize true freedom in art. The profound beauty of form they achieve forces us to reconsider our definition of the word, “disabled.” As a special feature, this exhibition will allow visitors to observe the artists’ production process, normally something only the studio staff is witness to. The exhibition venue will thus become a place to consider anew “the meaning and possibilities of art” in human life. (Some 100 artworks will be presented.) [Related Events] Lecture “What has been made, What can be made” Date: July 26(Sat) 14:00-16:00 Speaker: Shin Fukumori (Shobu Gakuen) “Art as a Haven of Happiness” Date: September 15(Mon/Public Holiday) 14:00-17:00 Part 1: Speaker - Genichiro Takahashi(writer) 14:00-15:00 Part 2: Speaker - Hiroatsu Sakuma (Atelier Element Present) Moderator: Atsuyuki Nakahara (Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum)

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<![CDATA[Hideo Ogiwara “Playing with Lines”]]> Found: opportunity

poster for Hideo Ogiwara “Playing with Lines”
Hideo Ogiwara “Playing with Lines”
at Kichijoji Art Museum (Musashino, Tama area)
(2014-07-03 - 2014-11-03)

Exhibiting the print works of Hideo Ogiwara with an opportunity to compare the various techniques employed in his practice with such impressive works as “Fairytale Land” and “Aesop’s Fables”.

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<![CDATA[Find Asia - Asia’s Creativities Meet in Yokohama]]> Found: residence

poster for Find Asia - Asia’s Creativities Meet in Yokohama
Find Asia - Asia’s Creativities Meet in Yokohama
at Yokohama Creative City Center (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2014-08-01 - 2014-11-03)

Find Asia is brings together the art of Japan, China and Korea in a special art program designed as an associate event of the Yokohama Triennale 2014 and the Culture City of East Asia Yokohama 2014. Placing a spotlight on Asian creators YCC opens up its spaces to form a space of communication and exchange in a fluid dialogue which surpasses the divisions between artists and viewer, art collectors, directors and designers in a diverse sharing of perspectives. Program Contents (1) Find ASIA and myself This is an exhibition and residence program showcasing art from across East Asia. Artist unit L Pack transform the YCC café into the “Yokoso Cocowa Cafedesu”, resident artists hold open studios and exhibitions, while special event programs are joined by Yuko Mohri Hitoshi Toyoda and Norimizu Ameya. Residence Program JI Lei in Yokohama Residence: July 15 – September 14 Open Studio August 1 – September 5 Exhibition September 6 – November 3 The World of Satoru Aoyama Open Studio August 1 – August 26 (2) Space Space – Lounge Space Produced by Yokohama Creators (3F) Space Space is a multi-purpose space for visitors to relax in, while also being used as a talk event and schooling space, created by Yokohama based designers NosignerA place to get to know and enjoy art. (3) Information Center (1F Entrance) An information center providing visitors with all the details of the Yokohama Triennale and the events of the Culture City of East Asia program. Spatial design is provided by interior design brand PAP Design and accompanied by infographics creative(c)ities created by creators from 11 Asian cities currently staying in Yokohama.

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<![CDATA[Yokohama Triennale Associated Program “BankArt Life 4— The Dream of East Asia”]]> Found: residency

poster for Yokohama Triennale Associated Program “BankArt Life 4— The Dream of East Asia”
Yokohama Triennale Associated Program “BankArt Life 4— The Dream of East Asia”
at BankArt Studio NYK (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2014-08-01 - 2014-11-03)

[Yokohama Triennale 2014 Related Program] Art collections and works made in residency programs, including the “Ongoing Korean Correspondence” program, in historic architectural sites. Venues: BankArt 1929 and surrounding historic buildings, shops, open spaces, and empty buildings.

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<![CDATA[TWS-Emerging 2014]]> Found: call, opportunity, residence

poster for TWS-Emerging 2014
TWS-Emerging 2014
at Tokyo Wonder Site, Shibuya (Shibuya area)
(2014-08-09 - 2015-02-01)

Ever since its opening in 2001, Tokyo Wonder Site has undertaken a wide range of programs to support and foster young artists. One such program, TWS-Emerging, is associated with the open call exhibition, Tokyo Wonder Wall, which has been providing talented young artists with a gateway to success. Each year, 100 artists are selected from approximately 1000 applicants, and their works are displayed at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo. Furthermore, the prize winners have their own exhibition at the public spaces in the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building. TWS-Emerging offers the opportunity for those selected artists to take part in another exhibition at Tokyo Wonder Site, having introduced over 200 artists to date. For this year, 19 young artists were chosen to show their works at TWS Shibuya as well as other related exhcange and residence programs. 2014.08.09 (Sat) - 08.31 (Sun) Ayano Honda, Kaho Shimizu, Shinichiro Koromo 2014.09.06 (Sat) - 09.28 (Sun) Mayu Hirota, Keisuke Matsuda, Hiroko Watanabe 2014.10.04 (Sat) - 10.26 (Sun) hop,Yuichiro Maekawa, Eijiro Saito, Masaya Tani 2014.11.01 (Sat) - 11.24 (Mon, holiday) Narumi Sasaki, Miyuki Motoyama, Toshio Miyaoka 2014.11.29 (Sat) - 12.21 (Sun) Marico Aoki, Hiroaki Ito, Ebosi Yuasa 2015.01.10 (Sat) - 02.01 (Sun) Yasufumi Ueno, Saki Sumida, Masashi Nakamura

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<![CDATA[Stephen Mushin “Now, if, what, then - Farming Tokyo”]]> Found: opportunity

poster for Stephen Mushin “Now, if, what, then - Farming Tokyo”
Stephen Mushin “Now, if, what, then - Farming Tokyo”
at Spiral (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2014-08-18 - 2014-08-31)

Melbourne based artist Stephan Mushin presents a vision of Tokyo reconsiders the city from ecological perspectives of energy, the food chain, and recycling. His “Tokyo” is one of the biggest cities in the world, endowed with a rich food culture but also a massive producer of waste. He presents images of fictional yet realizable machines that would both enliven Tokyo and help to solve these environmental problems in fantastical, fun ways. Experiencing the artworks and accompanying discussions, visitors of all ages will be encouraged to deepen their imagination and creativity, and dream of a positive future. [Related Events] Wrorkshop for Children and Families Dates: August 18th (Monday) – 21st, 2014 (Thursday) 14:00-15:00/16:00~17:00 Target: 5-12years old and families Creative Ideas Bar A discussion forum will also take place during the exhibition, inviting key persons in the fields of art, design, and education from Australia and Japan. Offering the opportunity to hear about the latest developments in these fields in both countries, visitors and experts alike will exchange ideas and gain new outlooks on learning and creativity. Date: August 20th (Wednesday) 18:00-20:00 Target: Students, teachers, designers and artists

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<![CDATA[The 67th Dentsu Advertising Awards]]> Found: awards, award

poster for The 67th Dentsu Advertising <U><U>Award</U>s</U>
The 67th Dentsu Advertising Awards
at Advertising Museum Tokyo (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-07-18 - 2014-08-24)

The Dentsu Advertising Awards were launched in 1947 by Hideo Yoshida, the fourth president of Dentsu, with the objective of raising the status of advertising socially and culturally, together with advertisers and media circles, by improving advertising theory and executional skills, and by introducing outstanding works. 67 years have passed since then and we have experienced a tremendous number of changes in the world we live in. Economic and social globalization and digitalization in communication means are probably the most outstanding changes. In the midst of these changes, advertising is at a turning point. Nevertheless, Hideo Yoshida’s belief that “advertising is a vital means to unite business and people” remains sound and advertising keeps being an important pillar of business strategy through corporate communication activities.

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<![CDATA[Find Asia - Asia’s Creativities Meet in Yokohama]]> Found: residence

poster for Find Asia - Asia’s Creativities Meet in Yokohama
Find Asia - Asia’s Creativities Meet in Yokohama
at Yokohama Creative City Center (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2014-08-01 - 2014-11-03)

Find Asia is brings together the art of Japan, China and Korea in a special art program designed as an associate event of the Yokohama Triennale 2014 and the Culture City of East Asia Yokohama 2014. Placing a spotlight on Asian creators YCC opens up its spaces to form a space of communication and exchange in a fluid dialogue which surpasses the divisions between artists and viewer, art collectors, directors and designers in a diverse sharing of perspectives. Program Contents (1) Find ASIA and myself This is an exhibition and residence program showcasing art from across East Asia. Artist unit L Pack transform the YCC café into the “Yokoso Cocowa Cafedesu”, resident artists hold open studios and exhibitions, while special event programs are joined by Yuko Mohri Hitoshi Toyoda and Norimizu Ameya. Residence Program JI Lei in Yokohama Residence: July 15 – September 14 Open Studio August 1 – September 5 Exhibition September 6 – November 3 The World of Satoru Aoyama Open Studio August 1 – August 26 (2) Space Space – Lounge Space Produced by Yokohama Creators (3F) Space Space is a multi-purpose space for visitors to relax in, while also being used as a talk event and schooling space, created by Yokohama based designers NosignerA place to get to know and enjoy art. (3) Information Center (1F Entrance) An information center providing visitors with all the details of the Yokohama Triennale and the events of the Culture City of East Asia program. Spatial design is provided by interior design brand PAP Design and accompanied by infographics creative(c)ities created by creators from 11 Asian cities currently staying in Yokohama.

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0832f9b3899239d4bd4ad11664ed138e
<![CDATA[Barry Whittaker “Throwing Things at the Sky”]]> Found: residency

poster for Barry Whittaker “Throwing Things at the Sky”
Barry Whittaker “Throwing Things at the Sky”
at 3331 Arts Chiyoda (Chiyoda area)
(2014-08-02 - 2014-08-07)

Cumulating his residency with 3331 Arts Chiyoda, Barry Whittaker (American artist active in Toledo, Ohio) will be presenting a series of digital works in this exhibition. Photography, video, interactive installation, audio, websites, and drawings are among the many methods utilized in his past works. With abundant opportunities for miscommunication while living a foreign life in Tokyo, where excessive digital communication throws messages in and out of space, Whittaker has been able to feed these experiences into his newest 3D works and soundscapes. Rm. 2013

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d33bf9a3911b6ad09db8515ba5c70c8a
<![CDATA[TWS-Emerging 2014]]> Found: call, opportunity, residence

poster for TWS-Emerging 2014
TWS-Emerging 2014
at Tokyo Wonder Site, Shibuya (Shibuya area)
(2014-08-09 - 2015-02-01)

Ever since its opening in 2001, Tokyo Wonder Site has undertaken a wide range of programs to support and foster young artists. One such program, TWS-Emerging, is associated with the open call exhibition, Tokyo Wonder Wall, which has been providing talented young artists with a gateway to success. Each year, 100 artists are selected from approximately 1000 applicants, and their works are displayed at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo. Furthermore, the prize winners have their own exhibition at the public spaces in the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building. TWS-Emerging offers the opportunity for those selected artists to take part in another exhibition at Tokyo Wonder Site, having introduced over 200 artists to date. For this year, 19 young artists were chosen to show their works at TWS Shibuya as well as other related exhcange and residence programs. 2014.08.09 (Sat) - 08.31 (Sun) Ayano Honda, Kaho Shimizu, Shinichiro Koromo 2014.09.06 (Sat) - 09.28 (Sun) Mayu Hirota, Keisuke Matsuda, Hiroko Watanabe 2014.10.04 (Sat) - 10.26 (Sun) hop,Yuichiro Maekawa, Eijiro Saito, Masaya Tani 2014.11.01 (Sat) - 11.24 (Mon, holiday) Narumi Sasaki, Miyuki Motoyama, Toshio Miyaoka 2014.11.29 (Sat) - 12.21 (Sun) Marico Aoki, Hiroaki Ito, Ebosi Yuasa 2015.01.10 (Sat) - 02.01 (Sun) Yasufumi Ueno, Saki Sumida, Masashi Nakamura

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<![CDATA[9th Golden Eggs All Star Design Showcase]]> Found: submissions, submission

poster for 9th Golden Eggs All Star Design Showcase
9th Golden Eggs All Star Design Showcase
at Axis Gallery (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2014-08-28 - 2014-09-07)

The annual exhibition aiming to connect students and society through design this year showcases selected work which highlights the future of design alongside individual submissions under the title of “Thank Nature - Design which learns from and draws upon the riches of nature” including various approaches to community and food design. [Related Event] Participating Students Presentation August 30(Sat) 14:00- September 2(Tues) 18:30-, September 4(Thurs) 18:30-

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<![CDATA[Catching up with Chino Otsuka, 2013 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize finalist]]> Found: call, opportunity, residency, awarded, award, entre

Chino Otsuka, <em>Imagine Finding Me</em>, 1975 and 2005, Spain, Japan, 2005, Chromogenic print, 305 mm x 406 mm.</

Chino Otsuka, Imagine Finding Me, 1975 and 2005, Spain, Japan, 2005, Chromogenic print, 305 mm x 406 mm.

Born in Tokyo and educated in the U.K., 2013 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize finalist Chino Otsuka uses photography and video to explore the fluid relationship between memory, photography, and time. She recently completed her residency at the Nikkei National Museum in Burnaby, B.C., which focused on researching Japanese picture brides and their forgotten stories. We caught up with Otsuka to discuss her residency research, work and experience.

AGO: While you were in Vancouver, you worked inside the archives and collection of the Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre. What did your research focus on, and what affect has working in Vancouver had on your work?

Chino Otsuka: The research I conduct is integral to the development of my work. For a while now I have been researching the history of Japanese emigrants. When I found out about the residency component of the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize and was able to choose anywhere in Canada, I knew I wanted to go to the Nikkei National Museum. Since I had previously done similar research on a group of Japanese who went to the Netherlands in the mid-19th century, I wanted to see the museum’s collections and learn more about the history of Japanese-Canadian immigrants.

During the residency I had the opportunity to access and explore museum collections that are not normally seen or easily accessible. I knew very little about the history of Japanese immigrants in Canada, or the hardships and injustice that they suffered. I read and came across so many moving stories. All of this is a very important part of Japanese history, and I’m so surprised that many of these stories are untold outside of Canada.

As my research progressed I became more and more interested in the stories of young women who came over from Japan as a “picture brides,” young Japanese women usually between 17 and 19 years old who came to Canada as in the early 20th century. Their marriages were arranged by showing the prospective bride and groom photographs of each other. Most of these women travelled from Japan and saw their husband-to-be for the first time when they arrived in Canada. I was drawn to their innocence, ambition and courage — their journey. They all longed for a new life in their new country. Yet when they arrived in Canada the life they had imagined was completely different. Hardship and many tragedies would follow them. They struggled and endured so much.

I’ve looked through many photographs and artefacts in the collection and chose to focus especially on their journey to Canada. There is a sense of anticipation around the little moment in their life when they were dreaming about the future. I’ve been working with the old photographs as well as photographing their belongings that they brought with them from Japan.

With your residency now complete, can you speak to the effect that the overall experience has had on your work? Did your work move in a new direction during the residency? If so, how?

The residency has given me a new perspective on my practice, as well as time to explore and experiment with new ideas. The work I started during my residency is not quite finished yet. I’m done with the research and photographing and am now working with these materials through editing and finding ways to present them.

What has the residency allowed you to do in terms of your work and research?

In my work I mainly explore the notion of autobiographical memory, so the residency at the Nikkei National Museum has given me the opportunity to explore and research the history, the collective memory – how the individual memories weave together to tell a story.

In her essay “Chino Otsuka’s Time Machine” Michiko Kasahara writes that your “journeys into the past are not sentimental and do not display a nostalgic atmosphere,” yet much of your work explores issues of duality, history, memory and self. Can you elaborate on/explain your method? Do you agree with the writer’s statement?

I work with the past and many of my works show my past. How I take my works, restage and rework them is really about today, not yesterday.
My works are personal but by carefully selecting the images, and recreating them in the certain ways, I’m trying to engage the viewers’ internal dialogue of their experiences. I hope to make the images/stories resonate and trigger the viewers’ own memories.

Your work, specifically in the series “Imagine Finding Me,” is extremely personal with the subject being your own self and memory. The Aimia | AGO Photography Prize is awarded by public vote. As the subject of the work, what were your thoughts on it being considered in this way?

I visited the AGO during the exhibition while the voting was going on, and when I wandered around the museum strangers came up to tell me that they voted for me. I guess they recognized me from my work, and that was a really strange experience.


*This interview was conducted via email in July 2014 and has been edited for style and brevity.

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29 July 2014, 12:22 pm 3bd46b2e3965663e39e76c1b7bb4c671
<![CDATA[Canadian migrant-rights activist Pablo Muñoz wins WorldPride 2014 National Youth Solidarity art contest]]> Found: jury
WINNER
WINNER
No Walls Between Us, Pablo Munoz, Vancouver (British Colombia)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Round dance on Parliament Hill, Fabric, Acrylic, Sharpie, 2013, Roxanne Martin, Sault Ste. Marie (Ontario)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Sans titre, Matthilde Cing-Mars, Trois-Rivières (Québec)
FINALIST
FINALIST
United, Leo Samilo, Surrey (British Colombia)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Untold truth, Bogdan Salii, Toronto (Ontario)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Complexity, Brianne Walker, Windsor (Ontario)

The Michaëlle Jean Foundation, the AGO and WorldPride Toronto 2014 are delighted to announce the winner of the 4th Wall Youth Solidarity Project online vote.

Selected as winner by more than a thousand Canadians of all ages from across the country, Vancouver-based artist and rights activist Pablo Muñoz receives $1,000 and will work with a seasoned public art practitioner to see his art mounted on the western wall of the AGO.

His work, No Walls Between Us, highlights the unique experiences of migrant and racialized LGBT youth. It was one of six pieces of art chosen by a jury to represent the theme of “Solidarity with Canada’s Two-Spirited and LGBTTIQQ Communities,” in an unprecedented exhibition celebrating WorldPride Toronto 2014.

On view at the AGO between June 22 and Nov. 15, 2014, the Youth Solidarity Exhibition will inspire Canadians to work together to promote safe, inclusive and healthy communities for Two-Spirited and LGBTTIQQ youth throughout the country. The other young artists featured in the exhibition are:

  • Mathilde Cinq-Mars, a multidisciplinary visual and animation artist from Trois-Rivière, Que. who has a BA from the University of Strasbourg;
  • Roxanne Martin, a digital artist from Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., and the great-niece of Cecil Youngfox, a trailblazing Anishinaabe painter and gay rights activist;
  • Bogdan Salii, a passionate visual artist from Toronto, Ont., who recently immigrated to Canada from Ukraine to pursue his dream of transforming his love for art into a lucrative business;
  • Leo Samilo, a nascent artist and recent high school graduate from Surrey, B.C’s Filipino community; and
  • Brianne Walker, a 17-year-old human rights activist from Windsor, Ont., and aspiring visual artist and filmmaker.

This project is actively supported by more than 55 human rights, faith-based, arts, newcomer, Aboriginal and health organizations across Canada. For a full list of project collaborators, click here.

About Pablo Muño
Colombian-born Pablo Muñoz arrived to Canada as a refugee in 2000. Today, he is an accomplished citizen whose artistic work extends from painting, design, performance art and writing, and his community work centers around immigrant and refugee youth issues, intersections of queer and racialized identities, and solidarity with indigenous communities. Over the past year, Pablo worked on the Make it Count campaign — a project that created community dialogues across the province addressing challenges faced by migrant youth. He is currently working as a story editor on a documentary telling the story of queer refugees coming into Canada. He also is a member of the Vancouver Foundation’s Education Granting Committee and the City of Vancouver’s Youth Advisory Committee.

The Youth Solidarity Project is funded in part by StreetARToronto, a program of the City of Toronto, as well as the K.M. Hunter Foundation.

About the 4th Wall program
In theatre, the “fourth wall” is an imaginary screen that creates a virtual separation between actor and spectator. There are many ways to cross the fourth wall and to make the invisible visible. The Michaëlle Jean Foundation chose to do so through the 4th Wall: Make the Invisible Visible program, in collaboration with several prestigious Canadian museums and art galleries. The goal is to invite young creators to break down the invisible walls that create solitudes between individuals and communities across Canada, by opening the doors of our major cultural institutions to emerging creators from marginalized backgrounds. The Foundation offers museum and art gallery space and bursaries to youth from disadvantaged backgrounds, often cut off from museums, so that they can produce original art that conveys their experiences, ideas and challenges. On display for the public to see, their work provokes debate and builds solutions. The first 4th Wall exhibition was launched on Feb. 5, 2014, at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, to mark Black History Month in collaboration with FRO Foundation.

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26 June 2014, 10:51 am ea30053a59b51a2b6d3048cc34f89f16
<![CDATA[Call for applications: An opportunity for Toronto-based MFA photography students]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submit

Are you or do you know a Toronto-based artist who is enrolled in or has recently graduated from an MFA program focusing on photography? If yes, the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize has an opportunity to share.

This August, one of the artists on the yet-to-be-announced shortlist for the 2014 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize will be in Toronto to participate in the Prize’s residency program. Each year, all four artists on the shortlist receive a fully funded, self-directed residency designed to deepen or enrich their respective practices.

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The artist is designing a teaching-focused residency that will be open to five Toronto-based artists who are currently enrolled in or recently graduated from an MFA program with a focus on photography. From Aug. 18 to Aug. 29, the five students will work with the artist, both as a group and one-on-one, with the goal of eliciting critical dialogue about each student’s work and potentially producing new work.

There will be three to four group meetings, and the artist will meet with each of the students individually two to three times over the course of the two-week period. The students will work between the visits to develop ideas and/or create new work. Each student will receive a $500 honorarium to support production and expenses during the study period.

Applicants must be currently enrolled in an MFA program in Canada or internationally or have graduated from such a program after Jan. 1, 2013. Applicants must be based in Toronto between Aug. 18 and 29, 2014, and be available for regular meetings and studio visits during this time.

Although the artist’s identity won’t be publicly revealed until the Aug. 13 shortlist announcement, students under consideration for the program will be notified of the artist’s identity before their participation is confirmed.

Applications must include an artist statement, CV and portfolio of as many as 25 images and/or 10 minutes of video work with detailed credit information (title, date, medium, dimensions). Applications to the program are due July 9.

To submit an application or for more information, please contact Sean O’Neill, Manager, Aimia | AGO Photography Prize at sean_oneill@ago.net.

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23 June 2014, 1:29 pm a491661c35ba6532af13776369b282bc
<![CDATA[Listen: Jim Munroe, Mark Connery and Jonathan Mak talk video games and comics]]> Found: residence

Click to play:

Download 81.4 MB MP3

Recorded: March 26, 2014, at the Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 01:29:05

In this podcast, hear AGO artist-in-residence Jim Munroe in conversation with artists Mark Connery, a Toronto-based comic and zine artist, and Jonathan Mak, a Toronto-based game developer, about their work, indie culture and how playfulness factors into their practices.

Jonathan Mak is a Toronto-based game developer working under the title Queasy Games. He recently collaborated with I am Robot and Proud (aka Shaw-Han Liem), a Toronto-based electronic music artist, on Sound Shapes for PS Vita and PlayStation®3. Sound Shapes features music by Beck, Deadmau5 and Jim Guthrie and graphics by Capy, Superbrothers, Pixeljam and Pyramid Attack.

Mark Connery is a Toronto-based producer of comics and zines. He is most known for the mini-comic adventures of Rudy. In addition to his own publications, his work has appeared in many group exhibitions and has been published in Exclaim!, Kiss Machine and in many small-press lit zines in Toronto and Vancouver.

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4 June 2014, 9:00 am 7ecbcd287d321df62d87955f8cbb5ea9
<![CDATA[In memoriam: A tribute to the memory of Lynne Cohen]]> Found: call, residency

The Art Gallery of Ontario shares in the loss of Lynne Cohen, one of Canada’s finest visual artists. Lynne’s remarkable body of work took us to extraordinary, often-foreboding places — places we would be unlikely to encounter in our daily lives, except through her compelling photographs. Her enigmatic, real-world photographs of interior environments, uninhabited by humans, alluded to her sense of wit and irony.

Lynne Cohen, Untitled (Column), 2009. © Lynne Cohen, 2010.

Lynne Cohen, Untitled (Column), 2009. © Lynne Cohen, 2010.

An internationally collected artist, Lynne was nominated for the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize (then called the Grange Prize) in 2009, and the AGO is proud to have exhibited her work alongside the nominees from Canada and Mexico. Lynne spent her Prize-sponsored residency in Mexico, inspired by interior spaces that became new installations of extraordinary photographs.

Lynne’s legacy will be remembered by all who admired her vision, dedication to students, loyalty to those who knew her and her incredible strength the past three years. Our deepest condolences to Andrews Lugg, her partner of 50 years, who was closest to Lynne in every way.

— Maia Sutnik, Curator, Special Photography Projects at the AGO

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15 May 2014, 1:48 pm e22ff6e59039f8515b186e701816c618
<![CDATA[Misa Hiramatsu + Mayumi Tanabe “Polymorphic”]]> Found: calls, call

poster for Misa Hiramatsu + Mayumi Tanabe “Polymorphic”
Misa Hiramatsu + Mayumi Tanabe “Polymorphic”
at SCAI The Bathhouse (Ueno, Yanaka area)
(2014-07-11 - 2014-08-02)

Misa Hiramatsu creates dramatic installations which evoke the specter of death through the transformation of everyday waste, pointing to the grotesque side of existence. Mayumi Tanabe meanwhile calls upon that sense of dizziness experienced when the weight of our tired body urges itself upon us, directing the formation of sculptural space through the melting forms of wax and vaseline. Here both artists call upon our physical senses in the processes of melting and rotting, as a metamorphosis assailed by the unknowable agent of time.

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<![CDATA[Takafumi Saito + Byungseo Yoo “The Dog Faces West, the Tail East”]]> Found: residency

poster for Takafumi Saito + Byungseo Yoo “The Dog Faces West, the Tail East”
Takafumi Saito + Byungseo Yoo “The Dog Faces West, the Tail East”
at Art Center Ongoing (Musashino, Tama area)
(2014-07-30 - 2014-08-10)

Member of contemporary and primitive fusing art group “Olta”, Takafumi Saito is a young artist currently drawing wide attention with his mix of common culture, temporary stages and over-adherence, brought to form in sculpture, installation, moving image and performance which places the body in danger. He brings to light a madness hidden in the contemporary world in his unanswerable projects. On the other hand Byungseo Yoo is an artist engaged in research of visual logic, continuing to question the very meaning of contemporary art. Using wit and the bizarre as his weapon he creates simultaneously comical and sad, simple and complex ambivalences circling around collaboration, black comedy and real participation. This work has come to spread out into fields of poetry and theater, with his own dramatic group “Unfinished Project” moving between the space of the black box and white cube. The two who first met in residency in Seoul now come together in what hints at being a dangerous chemical reaction. [Related Event] Talk Event “Performance Street Artist Collective” Date: August 1(Fri) 19:00- Guest: Yoshitaka Mohri (Sociologist) Admission: ¥1000 (1 drink + entrance) “Pre Ongoing School” Date: August 10(Sun) 15:00- Admission: ¥1500 (cake + drink)

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<![CDATA[Unreliable Reality – The Where of This World]]> Found: call

poster for Unreliable Reality – The Where of This World
Unreliable Reality – The Where of This World
at Shiseido Gallery (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-07-18 - 2014-08-22)

“Me” is an artist collective comprised of Haruka Kojin along with Kenji Minamigawa and Hirofumi Masui, the latter two being members of the “expressive action squad” called “wah document.” Wah document’s main mission is to execute ideas for works of art collected from the public. In their first exhibition in Tokyo “Me” transform the space of Shiseido Gallery into an encounter with our unreliable realities, questioning the rules of science and our own existence, layering personal memories with sculptural contrivances which gradually displace us and call into question “where of this world” we live in. [Related Event] Gallery Talk Date: August 3(Sun) 14:00-16:00 Venue: Word Shiseido (Shiseido Bld. 9F) Admission: Free *Please refer to the official website for further details

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<![CDATA[Mission [Space X Art] -Beyond Cosmologies]]> Found: opportunity

poster for Mission [Space X Art] -Beyond Cosmologies
Mission [Space X Art] -Beyond Cosmologies
at Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (Kiyosumi, Ryogoku area)
(2014-06-07 - 2014-08-31)

In the second decade of the twenty-first century both outer space, into which research and development progresses, and artists’ expressions of inner space are rapidly expanding/converging to constitute a parallel world. Coinciding with the 2014 space boom, this exhibition examines how outer space has been drawn infinitely closer to our daily lives, along with the inner space created by artists as a multiverse, surpassing individual cosmologies. Japan joined the exploration space after the war, and the since this time artists have also come to interpret our steps into the universe through their own particular expressions. This exhibition will present art installations; items connected with space exploration, such as parts of satellites and rockets (fairings); documents from the world of entertainment, such as literature, manga and anime; interactive exhibits; discussions and other events to explore the new possibilities that ‘reflect the expanding/converging world’. It will offer the opportunity to experience and consider ‘space’, not only as some different world or Utopia, but also as something that is ‘ordinary’ in a true sense. [Related Event] Shintaro Tanikawa Book Reading “The Next Universe” Date: June 29(Sun) 14:00-15:30 Venue: B2F Auditorium

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<![CDATA[Windows]]> Found: award

poster for Windows
Windows
at Diesel Art Gallery (Shibuya area)
(2014-02-21 - 2015-02-15)

Diesel Shibuya has recently launched a new initiative as part of its Home Collection inviting installations by architects and interior designers to be exhibited within the store. For the 4th version of this project, the innovative installation “Windows” has been created by Kimihiko Okada, an award winning architect working across a variety of fields.

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<![CDATA[Barry Whittaker “Throwing Things at the Sky”]]> Found: residency

poster for Barry Whittaker “Throwing Things at the Sky”
Barry Whittaker “Throwing Things at the Sky”
at 3331 Arts Chiyoda (Chiyoda area)
(2014-08-02 - 2014-08-07)

Cumulating his residency with 3331 Arts Chiyoda, Barry Whittaker (American artist active in Toledo, Ohio) will be presenting a series of digital works in this exhibition. Photography, video, interactive installation, audio, websites, and drawings are among the many methods utilized in his past works. With abundant opportunities for miscommunication while living a foreign life in Tokyo, where excessive digital communication throws messages in and out of space, Whittaker has been able to feed these experiences into his newest 3D works and soundscapes. Rm. 2013

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<![CDATA[“Unseen Daily Life” (Part1)]]> Found: residency

poster for “Unseen Daily Life” (Part1)
“Unseen Daily Life” (Part1)
at Tokyo Wonder Site, Hongo (Chiyoda area)
(2014-08-02 - 2014-09-28)

Tokyo Wonder Site features a two part exhibition of work from 6 Japanese and international artists all incorporating familiar everyday materials into their works. In the first volume of this program showcases the work of 3 artists who have recently joined TWS’s residency programs in Stockholm, Seoul and Tokyo, evolving new vantage points through their encounter with the culture of their host city and their daily living within this. The exhibition will also be accompanied by workshops which offer up the creative possibilities of environmental sound and everyday objects. (admission free/reservation required)

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<![CDATA[Stephen Mushin “Now, if, what, then - Farming Tokyo”]]> Found: opportunity

poster for Stephen Mushin “Now, if, what, then - Farming Tokyo”
Stephen Mushin “Now, if, what, then - Farming Tokyo”
at Spiral (Omotesando, Aoyama area)
(2014-08-18 - 2014-08-31)

Melbourne based artist Stephan Mushin presents a vision of Tokyo reconsiders the city from ecological perspectives of energy, the food chain, and recycling. His “Tokyo” is one of the biggest cities in the world, endowed with a rich food culture but also a massive producer of waste. He presents images of fictional yet realizable machines that would both enliven Tokyo and help to solve these environmental problems in fantastical, fun ways. Experiencing the artworks and accompanying discussions, visitors of all ages will be encouraged to deepen their imagination and creativity, and dream of a positive future. [Related Events] Wrorkshop for Children and Families Dates: August 18th (Monday) – 21st, 2014 (Thursday) 14:00-15:00/16:00~17:00 Target: 5-12years old and families Creative Ideas Bar A discussion forum will also take place during the exhibition, inviting key persons in the fields of art, design, and education from Australia and Japan. Offering the opportunity to hear about the latest developments in these fields in both countries, visitors and experts alike will exchange ideas and gain new outlooks on learning and creativity. Date: August 20th (Wednesday) 18:00-20:00 Target: Students, teachers, designers and artists

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<![CDATA[Spectacular Sports Visualisations]]> Found: calls, call, award, entre

The 2014 World Cup in Brazil marks the first time that goal-line technology has been used for FIFA’s international tournament and with that in mind National Football Museum commissioned me to give an overview of where these systems are coming from, and where they might be going. This essay was originally published at The Commentary Project.

When Google unveiled its long-awaited wearable computer, Glass, in June of 2012, it did so through what might be called a lifestyle montage, a series of extreme sports events performed by “some of the world’s top athletes”. The Glass-wearers first skydived out of an aeroplane, then took to mountain bikes to manoeuvre through the conference centre onto the event stage. Throughout, what was streamed to viewers in the auditorium and watching online was not footage of the athletes undertaking the events, but what the athletes themselves were seeing, their point of view. What is spectacular about Glass, despite its real power as a connected, networked object, and what almost all discussion of it concentrates on, is its camera, the ability to see from another’s viewpoint, and everything this reveals.

While miniature high-definition cameras such as the GoPro Hero – particularly popular with the extreme sports community, bracketed to helmets, handlebars and snowboards – have made POV shots possible for a while, there’s something about Glass’ head-mounted position which appeals, as if it were not a camera, but the eye itself. Basketball teams have been early adopters of Glass. The Sacramento Kings, Indiana Pacers and Orlando Magic have all used Glass to enhance the “fan experience” by sharing headsets between announcers, resting players, support staff and coaches, and relaying the feed to giant screens above the action – but the NBA has yet to permit the use of Glass on court during play itself.

Another function of these cameras, aside from both the focus on, and the freedom from, a human-centred viewpoint, is that they transform our idea not only of vision, but also of memory. Many wearable cameras are marketed as such, like ‘Memoto’ (now rebranded as ‘Narrative’) and ‘Autographer’, small wearable digital cameras clipped to the chest or hung round the neck which photograph the owner’s viewpoint almost continually, building a continuous stream of images and data called a ‘lifelog’. The promise of such devices is total recall (“we can remember it for you wholesale”) – a promise, of course, which is always illusory.

A more rugged version of Glass, Broadcast Sports Inc’s head-mounted Ref Cam, has been deployed by Major League Soccer in the US. While it looks like a massive pain to wear, its wide-angle lens, bobbing with the referee’s pace, seems to open up a correspondingly wide field of view from the centre of the field, which feels liberating after the surveillance-like gaze of stand-mounted cameras. This is in stark contrast to Sky Sports’ version in the UK, whose chest-mounted ref cam was derided by former England hooker Brian Moore, writing in the Telegraph that “apart from nausea nothing was added to the viewing experience and the only previously unseen footage was that of the sky or the top of the scrum.” Moore’s real point, however, was that there was a fundamental flaw in the idea that such cameras could capture more of the “truth” of the game unfolding in front of them: “What is seen on camera is not a true rendering of what is actually perceived in a stressful moment.” Moore even cited a 2010 science paper on the use of wearable cameras by the Hillsboro, Oregon, Police Department, which found that even when every moment of a police investigation was recorded digitally, this evidence still had the potential to mislead officers, the judiciary and juries because of “the lack of understanding of important factors like the field of view, focus of attention and interpretation” – which sounds, too, like the advice of a particularly astute sports coach.

Indeed, much debate which happens in sports commentary around technologies of vision and adjudication would not sound out of place in academic journals of both the sciences and the humanities. Sporting fields have become the testing grounds for these technologies, providing as they do enclosed, hermetic fields of view, and strictly managed rules of movement and engagement – the kind of laboratory only dreamt of by scientists developing surveillance and monitoring platforms for military and urban situations, their most common applications.

When the English and Australian cricket teams faced each other in the Ashes series of the Summer of 2013, much of the commentary-box discussion focussed on the use of the new Umpire Decision Review System (DRS), a suite of technologies which assist – or rather, overrule – the umpire adjudicating some of sports greatest unknowables, the LBW, and the snick. Of course, these technologies, intended to increase accuracy, only inflamed controversy as their own accuracy was questioned as much as the human umpires. LBW is, after all, an epistemological problem – the question of whether a ball which strikes the batsman would have struck the wicket were the batsman not there is a question for Plato, not for machines. Nevertheless, cameras and sensors descended from military targetting systems are trained on the wicket in order to determine the best possible answer, and the algorithms which make up this situation determine the outcome of games – much to the frustration of many players and spectators. As Test Match Special commentator Jonathan Agnew, echoing Moore, noted: “The problem with the introduction of technology is the expectation of 100% accuracy” – a simple observation, but one which cuts to the heart of applying such supposedly rigorous approaches to sport, a fundamentally human endeavour which thrives on close calls, points of view, and, ultimately, chance.

Digital cameras are always more than cameras: they do not just make images, they ‘see’ and process them. Every connected digital-imaging system is also a computer, observing and making decisions about what it sees. This distinction is particularly well illustrated by “freeD” technology, which stands for Free Dimensional Video, a proprietary imaging system which debuted at Yankee Stadium in the 2013 Baseball season. Video feeds from multiple 12-megapixel cameras around the ground are combined within a dedicated server to produce a three-dimensional “scene”, through which the director can manoeuvre a virtual camera to produce unlimited, even “impossible” points of view. The entirety of the game world is simultaneously captured and re-viewed as a simulation. As with Eadweard Muybridge’s development of high-speed photography, which first allowed us to perceive a galloping racehorse with all four feet off the ground, the augmentation of the eye with technological systems allows us to see sport in new ways.

This total release of the visible “point of view” from any “human” viewpoint corresponds to the perceived freeing of decision-making from human error. This summer, the Football World Cup will for the first time utilise goal-line technology to determine whether the ball has crossed the line. Several different systems competed for selection, including the version of Hawk Eye used in Premier League, but the one which was chosen is a German surveillance system called GoalControl 4D. A total of fourteen cameras mounted on the stadium roof capture the three-dimensional position of the ball to within a few millimetres, enabling not only accurate decisions about goal-line crossings to be immediately relayed to referees via wrist-mounted “smart watches”, but also stored, replayed, and endlessly reanalysed. As in Cricket, the deployment of such decision systems has been much debated and often opposed, most volubly by FIFA president Sepp Blatter who has stated that “Other sports regularly change the laws of the game to react to the new technology. … We don’t do it and this makes the fascination and the popularity of football”. In this too we hear the deeply felt but ultimately fruitless appeal to the idea of sport as a fundamentally human endeavour, not at risk from, but essentially composed of, human frailty and fallibility.

Fruitless, of course, because we apparently find ourselves incapable of resisting the technological promise of an ever greater, ever more incremental, approach to some impossible “truth”, a Zeno’s arrow fired by a linesman towards the centre of the field. In sport, this truth-of-outcome is inextricably linked to the truth-of-performance, wherein one competitor, one side, ‘deserves’ to win because they are better prepared, better trained, better deployed, better equipped with what, in military circles, is referred to as “battlefield awareness”, leading to “full spectrum dominance of the battlespace”. As such, the same technologies of surveillance and appraisal are applied not just to decision-making during play, but also to data-gathering for post-game analysis by commentators and coaches alike.

From the beginning of the 2011-12 season, the NBA started installing STATS LLC SportVU cameras in basketball arenas, a technology expected to be mandated by the end of 2014 (again, like the application of surveillance systems in civilian environments, what begin as experiments in technology are ultimately and almost always codified in law). The SportVU system consists, like GoalControl, of a network of cameras around the arena connected to a data-processing system which tracks not only the ball in play, but individually identifiable players as well. The system’s sophisticated algorithms are capable of determining not only positioning, but through situational analysis, the events produced by and at these locations, such as dribbles, passes, touches and shots. The data is used to produce official NBA stats for every game, but also – for teams which pay a subscription of around $100,000 per year – to analyse and determine optimal strategy for the players themselves.

In March 2013, the Grantland blog revealed that the Toronto Raptors were using the data to – among many other things – “build computerized “ghost defenders” that reacted in optimal ways to every offensive action. The team could then overlay camera recordings of actual game play to see how closely Toronto’s real players mirrored the actions of their ghosts.” Once again, the real-world action on the court is filtered and replayed through simulations in order to re-direct the action back in meatspace. This is what is really driving the adoption of seeing systems in sport: truth-of-outcome not only produced by truth-of-performance, but, through technological feedback, fine tuning that performance as well.

To see where such systems might go in the future, we need only look to their current limitations – and the parallels of and responses to those limitations in other, surveillance-saturated spheres. Cairos Systems was another German-based bidder for the World Cup goal-line job, using a system called GLT which embedded magnetic sensors into the frame of the goal, and into the ball itself (of course, Cairos also has a system, called VIS.TRACK, which tracks player performance data through a network of cameras). On their website, Cairos writes – unusually explicitly for a technology company, that “In football, there are many decisions and scenes that may be discussed controversially. In the end the truth often lies in the eye of the beholder. Penalty or not? Red card or a dive? Active or passive offside?” It goes on to state that whether or not the goal line is crossed is one decision which “is clearly defined by the rules and does not leave space for interpretation. The question whether or not a goal has been scored can be decided without any doubts due to the rules.” As such, this particular decision is particularly amenable to technological intervention.

The counter-examples given here – penalties, red cards, offside – are instructive, because they fit far better what Brian Moore called the “focus of attention and interpretation”, the contentious, context-is-everything moments of sporting contact. Once again, we are in the domain not of observation, but of inference. The claim is now being made, however, that many automated, intelligent surveillance systems cannot only determine what happened, they can infer intent; they not only look back, but forward.

A study by the universities of Bradford and Aberystwyth in conjunction with the UK Border Agency in 2011 used video cameras and high-definition thermal imagery – essentially the same technology used to detect the “hot spot” in cricket – alongside yet more algorithms to determine whether study participants were lying. Telling signals such as eye movement, dilated pupils and nose wrinkling are visible to the human/video eye, but thermal imagery also reveals subconscious swelling of the blood vessels around the eye, a sign of distress or fear which signals that untruths may be in play. The UKBA stressed, as they prepared to install such systems at UK airports in the summer of 2012, that the technology is only useful when paired with an experienced human judge – and by that logic, why should it not be deployed alongside positioning cameras in the stands of the World Cup, to assist referees in determining which of two participants in a contested foul is telling the truth?

Why, after all, should we wait for fouls and other offences, such as offside, to be committed? It should be just as easy to award penalties and free kicks on the basis of players’ intent, and would be much safer and fairer for all involved. Recently, the US Department of Homeland Security’s “Project Hostile Intent”, for example, secured funding for a host of technologies claiming to predict crime based on “suspicious” behaviour. One of them, another camera-server assemblage produced by BRS Labs, uses “a range of in-built parameters of what is ‘normal’, [and] can track up to 150 people at a time to build up a “memory” of suspicious behaviour to begin determining what is inappropriate.” They are currently being installed in more than 300 locations in San Francisco, with strong expressions of interest from other global cities – although, as yet, none from FIFA. But if such systems can be trusted to protect our lives and livelihoods from the threat of terrorist attack, then surely they can be trusted to prevent another Hand of God?

Blatter, Moore, and Agnew, are all, surprisingly or not, for better or worse, at the forefront of a debate which extends far beyond the playing field. When we see sport through the eyes of the machines, we fundamentally change the nature of sport – and reveal, too, the extent to which the rest of society is reformed by our drive to visualise and reframe it with these technologies. As in so many ways, sport itself becomes the lens through which we understand ourselves.

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29 June 2014, 5:36 am f03acc6964c1ddc19e1bffbf2547e41c
<![CDATA[#Rorschcam NYC]]> Found: call, residency

I just arrived in New York for a three-month residency at Eyebeam. I had a rough first week, but on Monday fellow resident Ingrid Burrington showed me the Department of Transport’s online traffic cameras for New York City. I’d wanted to do a new rorsch-thing for a while (see, previously, Rorschmap and Rorschmap: Street View Edition) – and, as the streetview version was a little love letter to London, I thought I could redeem myself with this city by making it something nice: so I did.

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#Rorschcam NYC takes hundreds of live New York traffic cameras, from all five boroughs, and makes what I call rorsches out of them; simple, reflected auto-images – or the network dreaming the city.

They look pretty great at night too (see this Flickr set for more screen captures – but they’re better live):

rorschcam2

Like the city itself, it’s a little grimmer, a little darker than London. And then you start to see the stories. Have fun exploring.

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11 March 2014, 11:35 am 9d893baf571b3918983210bdf10ccc4a
<![CDATA[Planespotting]]> Found: call, entre

Today is International Migrants Day. Last week, I wrote about the failed deportation of Isa Muaza. Yesterday, Unity Centre Glasgow announced that another appeal by Muaza’s legal team had failed, and he was rescheduled for deportation, alongside a large number of others, on Tuesday night.

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I heard at about 7pm that several detainees had been loaded onto vans at Harmondsworth Detention Centre and were on the move. I didn’t know where they were headed, but I knew that many previous flights had left from the private aviation area at Stansted Airport, a largely un-signposted collection of car parks and hangars on the western side of the airport. I arrived there at 8, just in time to see the first of several coaches and security vans, together with a police escort, arrive at the Inflite Jet Centre, a private customs and handling facility mostly used by private jets.

The coaches, five in all and probably from several different detention centres, arrived between 8 and 9, and were accompanied by silver vans bearing the logo of security company Tascor, formerly Reliance, who took over the role of deportation escorts from G4S in 2011 following the death of Jimmy Mubenga. Tascor has a page on its website called Our Values, where it boasts: “We steer clear of politics”. Most of the coaches were from WH Tours in Crawley, although one bore the bright yellow sun and jaunty typography of Just Go!

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It is profoundly uncomfortable watching anonymous people of colour being loaded on and off vans and planes in the middle of the night under tight security. When you know a little of the background of the detainees, when you read their claims of torture and violence, their long battles to secure asylum, the institutional racism and homophobia, it’s terrible. But even without knowing these things, the manner in which it is done should tell you everything you need to know. The British Human Rights lawyer Gareth Peirce writes in Dispatches from the Dark Side, on UK complicity in torture, that “what is in fact the law precisely mirrors instinctive moral revulsion” but that “in this country, the government hardly needs such acceptance, since here the additional and crucial factor is that the public is unlikely to be given sufficient information to trigger revulsion.” Hence the night, the private terminals, charter flights, the hired coaches. All of this is deliberate: it is a policy of not being seen.

The detainees were kept on the coaches for some time, and there appeared to be some confusion about when they were going to depart. It’s standard practice in this situation to bring extra “reserve” deportees to the airport without warning, a practice condemned as inhumane by some MPs and the Inspector of Prisons. Before deportation, each detainee is issued with a plane ticket which gives the flight time – 22:20hrs in this case – and a flight number. As the flights are chartered, the flight number – here PVT091 – is internal, so it’s impossible to find out more details about it, except by going to the airport. The Home Office has been running deportation charter flights for some time, under as much secrecy as they can get away with, and refuses to disclose the companies involved in case it damages their commercial relationships. The ongoing deportation of Nigerians on charter flights is called “Operation Majestic”, but there are regular flights to many other countries, including “popular destinations” such as Pakistan and Afghanistan. Corporate Watch published a comprehensive report on what they call collective expulsion last month.

Blog_02

On the tarmac by the jet centre sat a Titan Airways 767. Titan Airways is based at Stansted, and describes itself as “the UK’s most prestigious charter airline.” Its fleet ranges from small business aircraft to widebodied airliners:

Since it’s foundation in 1988, Titan Airways has grown into the UK’s most prestigious charter airline, specialising in bespoke air charter, tour operator programmes and high end / corporate air travel as well as airline sub charter and aircraft leasing. It brings the very best standards of care and comfort to all its passengers. Once safely aboard, they can relax and enjoy our superb in-flight service and a wide choice of cuisine and fine wines to complete the experience. Titan’s modern, reliable aircraft can operate from all major international and regional airports day and night, 365 days a year.

It’s cold, and wet, and dark, and some of the deportees have been sitting on board coaches for hours, while Tascor guards mill about, smoke and chat. As it approached midnight, there was more activity around the plane, and it appeared that all the deportees were on board as the coaches left the terminal compound empty and parked up outside. (The next day, Unity tells me that two people were taken off the flight at the last minute, but those people estimated that around 80 Nigerians and Ghanaians were on board, including Isa Muaza, who was taken straight to hospital on arrival in Lagos, and a woman who married a British citizen two years ago, and was not expected to be deported).

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You can watch flights taking off from the far side of the airport, from a muddy lane alongside the north end of the runway. On the way over to it, I was stopped by the Police, who had been told I had been seen around the private aviation area. They were happy that I was a ‘spotter’ looking for planes – and advised me to join Essex Police’s Plane Watch scheme – but also warned me that the private aviation section was a restricted area, and I shouldn’t go there.

At 00:27, the Titan Airways 767 roared down the Stansted runway and into the night. Moments before, its call-sign appeared on Flightradar: AWC48A. And from there, an aircraft registration number: G-POWD.

We can see G-POWD on approach to Lagos a little after 6am. Two hours later, it’s on the move again, making the hop westwards from Lagos to Accra, the capital of Ghana, where it makes another stop. And then at 11am it appears to lift off back in the direction of London – at time of writing, it is probably somewhere over North Africa.

Flight_000

Flight_001

Flight_002

Flight_03

When I got back to my car around 1, I had a flat battery, and had to wait for a repair man. When he arrived, and I explained what I was doing in this godforsaken place, he told me he’d been at the Inflite Terminal recently too, to jump-start a brand-new Tascor transporter van, whose driver told him these flights happen all the time, and nobody knows about it, not even most of the people who work at the airport. “Makes you think,” he said. “Makes you think.”

*

Photos are available at Flickr

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18 December 2013, 12:19 pm e89e215eac93545ed6af598bc198fd46
<![CDATA[Recent Work, November 2013: Render Ghosts, GPS, Landsat.]]> Found: call

render-desert

For some time, I have been threatening to write about the Render Ghosts. I was asked to contribute something to Electronic Voice Phenomena, an online literature and art project by Mercy and Penned in the Margins, and so I wrote about my recent trip to New Mexico, in search of the Render Ghosts:

I first noticed the Render Ghosts on the hoardings surrounding a new development near Finsbury Square. On the balconies of some vast, virtual tower, two pixelated figures looked out over a darkened London, a perfect red-pink gradient sunset behind them. He had short dark hair and stubble, wore a black jacket and blue jeans. She had a cropped red bob, white jacket, and a purple knee-length skirt. I didn’t know who they were, but I started seeing them everywhere.

Read the full piece over at EVP.

I also have a short essay and illustrations in the wonderful new Visual Editions‘ book of writing and maps, Where You Are, which also includes contributions from Joe Dunthorne, Geoff Dyer, Olafur Eliasson, Sheila Heti, and more.

VE5_WhereYouAre_LR10

To ask “Where You Are” invites a series of responses: cartographic, historical, social, spiritual, situational; discursive or prescriptive. The GPS system is a monumental network that provides a permanent “You Are Here” sign hanging in the sky, its signal a constant, synchronised timecode. It suggests the possibility that one may never need be lost again; that future generations will grow up not knowing what it means to be truly lost.

The book is available to order now, but you can read the essay, and see the illustrations (much beautified by the designers at Bibliothèque), alongside all the other contributions on the Where You Are website.

The astute among you might notice a strong similarity between the diagrams in Where You Are and the piece I made for Container some months back:

gps-container

This 3D-printed object is the same thing under discussion in Where You Are:

This is a model of the Global Positioning System (GPS), a constellation of 24 satellites, in six orbital groups of four satellites, each orbital plane at 55 degrees inclination, and 60 degrees right ascension to its neighbour, 20,200 kilometres above the surface of the earth; a machine we are all living inside.

I’d had the original model sitting on my desk for some time before Tim asked me for a contribution to Container. In trying to draw and understand the GPS system as an abstract machine, I’d modelled the constellation in Sketchup – it was a natural step to flip-flop this nest of intersecting cones of influence back into the physical realm again, so that I could roll it between my fingers, as Einar and I did with airfix models of the drones, before the shadows (Einar’s own thinking about GPS, with Timo and Jørn, led to the Satellite Lamps project.) I call this the “Close Encounters” method.

landsat

A while back, I started the Laaaaaaandsat tumblr, which automatically posts, several times a day, every image released by the USGS Landsat observation programme – an ongoing, comprehensive survey of the planet by another satellite, 700km above the earth’s surface.

The endless stream of off-kilter images – reoriented so North is ‘up’ – remains a endless source of pleasure. So when Aperture magazine asked for 200 words on “What Matters Now” in photography, I thought of this little robot cameraman in the sky. 200 words is not enough, but it’s in the new issue.

NASA’s Landsat is the longest-running program dedicated to photographing the Earth from space, and has created millions of images since its inception in 1969. The first satellite, Landsat 1, was launched on July 23, 1972, atop a Delta 900 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Its mission was to photograph the whole Earth using three cameras which see both visible light and the near-infrared, and a four-channel multispectral scanner. The scanner was the project’s greatest innovation as it reveals hidden details about the planet’s surface, producing data and imagery used for everything from disaster relief, to agriculture, to studying climate change.

In February of this year, the program continued with the launch of Landsat 8. This incarnation features a more powerful scanner which sees in the ultraviolet; the panchromatic; the shortwave, near-, and thermal-infrared; revealing the presence of dust and smoke, of chlorophyll, of sub-surface rock formations, and the shape of clouds. The satellite captures four hundred images every day, creating a complete picture of the planet every sixteen days. Every one of these images is in the public domain, allowing every one of us to use, benefit from, and marvel at this ever-growing, ever-changing automated portrait of our planet.

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15 November 2013, 8:55 am 8b6908130db927b884e2c503ebf340d0
<![CDATA[#OccupyTheCloud]]> Found: call, entre

“Occupy the Cloud”, an installation for Open Heart Surgery, The Moving Museum, 180 Strand, October – December 2013.

Occupy-Long

“Occupy the Cloud” is an installation of three banners on the facade of 180 Strand, a brutalist office block on a main road in central London. The banners are made of pixelated, virtual skies taken from architectural renderings, like those which adorn nearby building sites. They feature three symbols: the lightning bolt through a circle of the international squatters’ movement; the @-symbol used to denote digital location or direction (and acquired in 2010 by MoMA); and the Cloud symbol, which has come to stand for the vast and remote data storage and processing capabilities of corporations and governments. (I have previously made the assertion, both humorously and more directly that the Cloud is a lie.) The banners themselves occupy an uneasy position between corporate branding, and protest.

When I was asked to contribute to the Moving Museum’s London show, I initially intended to make work based on my ongoing Render Ghosts project, which examines the effects of software designs and processes on society and the built environment (I’ve previously written about this for Domus). One plan was to create flags for the Render Ghosts, who are the people who appear in architectural visualisations, to mark their occupation of that liminal space between the real and the virtual, the physical and the digital, the present and the future.

A couple of things focussed the work. The first was a site visit to 180 Strand, a vast and currently empty building in central London, surrounded by major streets, and major developments (the next site on the street, surrounded by hoardings, boasts “a luxurious new development of stunning apartments and penthouses”). The second was my experience of censorship in Australia last month. I realised it would be possible to make a very public work; and there was no point in being subtle.

Occupy-Banners

In the last few months we’ve learned much about the extent to which supposedly secure “cloud” services have been infiltrated by our security services without oversight or consent. The latest revelations detail explicitly how data passed between Google and Yahoo servers is directly intercepted. But anyone who saw the hundreds of metal barriers which were used to fill Paternoster Square by its corporate owners in February 2012 to prevent peaceful protestors approaching the London Stock Exchange is unlikely to assume that we can trust corporations to act in our best interests any more than governments. Indeed, some of them are starting to act like governments, and no less opaquely than the traditional nation-states.

At the same time, the UK government’s primary response to rising house prices and rental costs, a lack of affordable housing, local councils moving residents out of the city, and a steep rise in homelessness, has been to criminalise squatting, a practice which has a long and radical tradition in this country.

The Levellers and the Diggers of the 17th Century occupied public lands and cultivated them for the public benefit – the state and the landowners conspired to imprison and execute them. It was a young Leveller, John Lilburne, whose false imprisonment and torture lead directly to the establishment of the principle of human rights in English law, and the founding documents which became the US Constitution and Bill of Rights. It is those same rights and laws which have been so violently abused over the last decade to permit exactly the same tortures and renditions which Lilburne was subjected to. The brutal reactions to peaceful public protest in the UK, from Occupy to anti-war marches and the student protests, reveal the illusion of “public” space once again.

As I write this, the UK government is debating its own oversight of the intelligence and security services. The MP Tom Watson, as well as linking the abuse of secrecy powers to the CIA’s drone assassination programme, just made the assertion that “An individual’s data is like their vote: individually minor, privately performed, and hugely powerful when aggregated. We should no more tamper with an individual’s data than tamper with their vote.” In my essay earlier this Summer for Matter magazine, Ring of Steel, I attempted to show how our technological systems tend towards secrecy, and are complicit in abuses of state power, and blanket, undemocratic surveillance. In his essay Turnkey Tyranny, Surveillance and the Terror State, Trevor Paglen states that “[b]y exposing NSA programs like PRISM and Boundless Informant, Edward Snowden has revealed that we are not moving toward a surveillance state: we live in the heart of one.” Paglen asserts that networked technologies as they are employed now do “not merely provide the capacity for “turnkey tyranny”—they render any other future all but impossible.” Powerful organisations which are cavalier with democratic rights are also cavalier with personal data and privacy: the two are linked, directly.

The depredations of corporations and governments on the internet reveal that it, too, is only a potential commons: not a zone of freedom, but one of conflict and power. We have re-discovered the efficacy of spatial protest: we can take the banks to protest unjust tax arrangements, but can we occupy the datacentres over the same issues?

It’s hard to shift these debates from the physical sphere to the digital and back again, to make the necessary connections. But as a friend pointed out about the online harassment debate in the UK, the only way to make sense of it was to remove the prefix “online”, and the issue becomes much clearer. In order to act fully and democratically in the world, we need to recognise that that world does not end at the screen, that the shadowy infrastructure of the network and the cloud is both a political territory and as viable and vital a platform for activism and action as the piazza and the high street. We need to fully account for the imbalances in power produced by the shifting of vast computing resources offboard, offshore, and out of sight.

The entreaty to “Occupy the Cloud” is a call to link these spheres of action, to recognise the central role that technology plays in shaping, producing, and sustaining contemporary politics; and to develop the tactics for action and the frameworks for understanding which will allow us to intervene for a more democratic future.

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More pictures at Flickr.

Purchase an “Occupy the Cloud” t-shirt. 30% of profits will be donated to Shelter.

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31 October 2013, 12:06 pm 6fd0098c88ba4e8e6bcbd73e433df0d6
<![CDATA[Australia: Drone Shadows, Diagrams, and Political Systems]]> Found: calls, call, entre

slq-drone

This week I was due to install another Drone Shadow, this one in Brisbane, Australia (that’s a planning mock-up, above). I had been invited by the Brisbane Writers Festival, and we had received permission from the Queensland State Library to install the work on their premises. Unfortunately, due to the actions of Arts Queensland, the department of the State Government with overall responsibility for the arts, it has been impossible to proceed with the work. The actions of Arts Queensland in this case have been both incredibly frustrating and boringly familiar: they have stalled, dissembled, obfuscated and lied, all in the service of silencing an artistic work and preventing a proper debate occurring, either about the work, or the government’s censorship of it. (For the record, there is a full account of my dealings with Arts Queensland available here.)

I’ve often been asked if I have got into any kind of trouble for creating the Drone Shadows before, and the answer has always been no. This is despite the fact that we have drawn them in Istanbul, during a period when the Turkish government was in negotiation to purchase Predator drones from the US, and in Washington DC – right next to the White House – at the height of the US drone war. But apparently the image – the bare outline – of a drone was too much for the government of Queensland.

In Istanbul we drew a Predator, in DC a Reaper. In Brisbane I proposed to draw a Global Hawk, the largest military unmanned aircraft currently in service. Late last year it was revealed that the United States flew secret Global Hawk spy missions from Air Force bases in Australia in 2001-2006. The programme was revealed by a group of amateur aviation historians who tracked the Global Hawks arriving and taking off. When they revealed details of the flights, they were visited by Australian defence security officials who demanded they not reveal details of the flights. An Australian senator who proposed to notify the public of the flights was silenced by the US Air Force, which demanded the flights remain classified.

Since then, Australia has been in prolonged negotiations with the US to purchase Global Hawks itself, announcing an AU$1 billion programme in 2004, rising to AU$3 billion in 2012. The latest election, which takes place quite coincidentally this Saturday, has led to further fierce debates over Australian defence and the drone program.

Australia’s domestic drone program is primarily aimed at “securing borders”, and its preference for maritime versions of the Global Hawk is due to the need for surveillance of immigration by sea. This program aims to ensure, in the words of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd in July 2013, that “any asylum seeker who arrives in Australia by boat will have no chance of being settled in Australia as refugees”, by shifting the problem to neighbouring countries such as Papua New Guinea. There is also a long history of asylum claimants being housed at former Air Force bases – and a long history of government objection to artworks dealing with the subject: see for example the story of Escape from Woomera, a political computer game about a detention camp in a remote Australian Defence Force base in South Australia.

One of the many reasons given by Arts Queensland for their opposition to the installation of the Drone Shadow was the opening at the Queensland Museum next door of an exhibition of thousands-year-old artefacts from Afghanistan, to which members of the local Afghan community had been invited. Arts Queensland expressed their view (after several weeks of denying any such issue) that this community might be made uncomfortable by the work. The community was never consulted, and the Museum itself raised no objection. Arts Queensland called it a “raw issue”. Indeed it is.

Australia’s Defence Forces have been involved in the war in Afghanistan since 2001. This contribution has included ships, manned aircraft, ground troops – and, more recently, drones.

The Royal Australian Air Force has been using drones in Afghanistan since 2009, when it first started to deploy the Israeli-built Heron drone, a twin-hulled surveillance drone the size of a light aircraft. At a 2012 promotional event on Australia’s Gold Coast, a short drive from Brisbane, Australia’s most senior military drone commander stated that the drone program was “like crack cocaine, a drug, for our guys involved – [they] just can’t get enough of it.”

woomera

These drones are in fact still owned by the Israeli manufacturer, and leased via a Canadian company – as Australia’s ABC News put it: “Israeli-owned drones, leased by Canadians, flown by Australians, fighting a war against Islamist insurgents in Afghanistan”. The RAAF drone teams are trained by Canadian and Israeli civilians at Amberley in Queensland, on the outskirts of Brisbane. Before they deploy to the field, they spend hours test-flying the drones over a simulated Afghan village, constructed in 2011, on the Woomera test range, close by the notorious refugee detention centre. (Picture above: a Heron drone parked at Woomera Air Base, South Australia, via Google Earth.)

The RAAF’s Herons are nominally unarmed, but they are equipped with lasers which allow them to mark targets for incoming airstrikes or artillery – the networking of contemporary military forces means that the formal distinctions between the capabilities of different weapons systems are increasingly meaningless. The drones are a key part of the “kill chain”, the process by which targets are selected and attacked by the entire system, and the ADF also calls on US and British armed Reaper drones to support its ground troops in battle.

In describing the contours of Australia’s relationship with drones, we see how, once again, such relationships extend beyond the individual aircraft to encompass far wider issues including domestic politics, international relations, warfare, immigration and networked technologies.

Drones are avatars of the the political process: they are instantiations of a set of ideologies and beliefs, made visible by their reification in electromechanical systems. When we talk about drones, we are really talking about the politics that demand, shape, and deploy them, and the politics which are made possible by them. This politics reflects the drones themselves: it is a politics of violence, of obfuscation, of radical inequality of sight and action, and it is sustained by that obfuscation and that inequality.

No wonder then that politicians are afraid of even artistic representations of the drone. No wonder they cite feelings of “discomfort” at even mentioning them, although in projecting this discomfort onto an immigrant population – without consultation – they reveal even more clearly the complicity of the technology in war and social oppression.

The Drone Shadow is not just a picture of a drone. It is a diagram of a political system. Every time we draw one, we use it to cast light on the actors who would prefer that the reality of their intentions and actions remain hidden.

This is the nature of networked technology today: it is the product of an embedded politics which it simultaneously obscures, through its apparent sophistication, and renders startlingly visible, through its explicit form. That invisibility is the intention of power; rendering it visible is the intention of art.

In the present case, power in all its petty exercise has done its utmost to render such a debate invisible. That it has succeeded for the moment, with the barest minimum of opposition from the cultural institutions which should oppose such exercises at every step, is saddening. It is also, I have to believe, unlikely and impossible to remain the case for long.

*

If you would like to draw your own Global Hawk shadow, you can download a schematic for the installation here.

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5 September 2013, 9:03 pm 1f30a7ddd1481c51a55c7af95cee03d2
<![CDATA[Bologna Illustrators Exhibition 2014]]> Found: submissions, submission

Bologna Illustrators Exhibition 2014
at Itabashi Art Museum (Tokyo: Others area)
(2014-07-05 - 2014-08-17)

Founded in 1967 the annual Bologna Illustrators Exhibition is renowned as the largest picture book illustrators competition in the world and now in its 48th year it received 3000 submissions in 2014, from which 75 artists from 23 different countries were especially selected, including 15 artists from Japan, which are shown here at Itabashi Art Museum along with the work of Taro Miura and Satoe Tone who have achieved high success since previously being selected for this competition. *For information on related events please refer to the official website.

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<![CDATA[Depicting the Indelible Japanese Landscape: Hiroshige’s “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido” and Contemporary Artists]]> Found: opportunity

poster for Depicting the Indelible Japanese Landscape: Hiroshige’s “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido” and Contemporary Artists
Depicting the Indelible Japanese Landscape: Hiroshige’s “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido” and Contemporary Artists
at Bernard Buffet Museum (Greater Tokyo area)
(2014-07-19 - 2014-09-28)

The Musée Bernard Buffet is holding an exhibition of the Hoeido edition of “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido” by the ukiyo-e master Hiroshige Utagawa (1797-1858) and works by contemporary artists who have been inspired by him. The Hoeido edition of “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido,” regarded as the artist’s ultimate masterpiece, presents scenes along the highway as they change over the seasons and over time with abundant lyricism. The prints in this series are also known for the rich variety with which Utagawa depicts the human figure in the landscapes at each location. The world these prints creates, abounding in its rich sense of humanity, continues to capture the hearts of artists today. Leiko Ikemura (1951- ) is an artist who lives and works in Europe, where she continues her fundamental questioning of human existence. After the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, she began engaging in a dialogue with Hiroshige’s “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido,” which could be said to depict the essential, primordial landscapes of Japan. That experience has led to her creating poems and a new series of drawings. Samurai warriors coexist with contemporary individuals in the Yamato-e style miniatures of Akira Yamaguchi (1969- ). In them, Yamaguchi engages in a dialogue with styles from the past while humorously applying the spirit of modern criticism. Yamaguchi creates new landscapes based on places that have caught his eye in the Mishima area, such as the Mishima Taisha and other shrines, expressed through his own interpretations of them. “Hiroshige is my hero!” says Kazuyuki Takezaki (1976- ). Staying in the Mishima area, he has become enthralled with the landscapes along the Genpe and Kakita rivers and has created paintings and built installations inspired by phenomena he has observed there. This exhibition is an opportunity to rediscover the fascination of Utagawa’s “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido,” to experience the work of several contemporary artists, and to contemplate the indelible, essential landscapes within each of us. [Related Event] Workshop “Let’s Make a Landscape with Takezaki-san!” Date: Jul. 21 (Mon, public holiday) 13:00–15:30 Participants: 18 (Young children through Junior High Students) Admission: ¥1000 Please see the venue’s website for reservations, details, and information on more related events.

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<![CDATA[Find Asia - Asia’s Creativities Meet in Yokohama]]> Found: residence

poster for Find Asia - Asia’s Creativities Meet in Yokohama
Find Asia - Asia’s Creativities Meet in Yokohama
at Yokohama Creative City Center (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2014-08-01 - 2014-11-03)

Find Asia is brings together the art of Japan, China and Korea in a special art program designed as an associate event of the Yokohama Triennale 2014 and the Culture City of East Asia Yokohama 2014. Placing a spotlight on Asian creators YCC opens up its spaces to form a space of communication and exchange in a fluid dialogue which surpasses the divisions between artists and viewer, art collectors, directors and designers in a diverse sharing of perspectives. Program Contents (1) Find ASIA and myself This is an exhibition and residence program showcasing art from across East Asia. Artist unit L Pack transform the YCC café into the “Yokoso Cocowa Cafedesu”, resident artists hold open studios and exhibitions, while special event programs are joined by Yuko Mohri Hitoshi Toyoda and Norimizu Ameya. Residence Program JI Lei in Yokohama Residence: July 15 – September 14 Open Studio August 1 – September 5 Exhibition September 6 – November 3 The World of Satoru Aoyama Open Studio August 1 – August 26 (2) Space Space – Lounge Space Produced by Yokohama Creators (3F) Space Space is a multi-purpose space for visitors to relax in, while also being used as a talk event and schooling space, created by Yokohama based designers NosignerA place to get to know and enjoy art. (3) Information Center (1F Entrance) An information center providing visitors with all the details of the Yokohama Triennale and the events of the Culture City of East Asia program. Spatial design is provided by interior design brand PAP Design and accompanied by infographics creative(c)ities created by creators from 11 Asian cities currently staying in Yokohama.

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<![CDATA[Getty gong for Lord Rothschild]]> Found: awarded, award
J. Paul Getty medal awarded to the UK arts patron for achievements in philanthropy and conservation

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25 July 2014, 1:14 pm 37048cc2d291a59237cd30bdb2d5e8da
<![CDATA[TTTOW - A unique film festival]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline
TTTOW or Taxi Takes on The World is a unique film festival where anyone across the world can participate. All you need is a camcorder (a smartphone will do!), a taxi ride and the ensuing conversation with the taxi driver - recorded and sent to the organizers. 




Yes, its as simple as that. But what exactly is this film festival about? 

The Taxi Takes on the World is a crowd sourced interactive documentary about conversations between drivers and passengers from inside taxis all around the globe. This user generated project aims to harness honest grassroots interactions and present the world’s ‘video takes’ on matters that affect us all. 


“Talks inside taxis are usually between people of diverse backgrounds and so offer a variety of perspectives. These ‘takes’ have the power to blur boundaries and bridge cultures. The Taxi Takes on the World will showcase crowd sourced video stories that mainstream media ignores about times when people find common ground and break stereotypes about the ‘other’. Mobile technology allows a democratization of media which aligns with my work’s vision for how new media will shape our future. This film festival will be part of a traveling film festival and offers a great opportunity to showcase citizens’ stories of brotherhood” - Vandana Sood - Giddings, Creator, Founder, Executive Director.

Date & Venues


The film festival will be held from The 21ST of September 2013 to the 2nd of October 2013 in Jammu and Kashmir, New Delhi, Punjab and Manipur. Kashmir and Manipur are both conflict states of India. 

This film festival is a partnership between The Taxi Takes on the World project and Standing Together to Enable Peace, Trust (STEP) a non-profit organization established in New Delhi in 2009.

Themes


The film festival will focus on certain broad themes:

  • Religious and ethnic conflict
  • War and terror
  • Race
  • Gender
  • Class
  • Culture

Each of these broad global topics has regional nuances that the mainstream media often overlooks. Through the prism of the taxi, where every day people from often widely disparate backgrounds meet, this film festival will tell a story about how, given the right space, we all can understand each other and speak a common language.

Where & How to

Need guidance on how to go about it? Check out this short prezi that suggests the kind of questions you can ask to begin a conversation and start your take. Find the application procedure, rules & regulations all on the TTOW submissions page.

Hurry, the submissions deadline is September 10, 2013!

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22 August 2013, 2:40 pm d0adb23994c64fad4eae2c21551a7229
<![CDATA[How Apple's new computers impact filmmaking]]> Found: calling, call

The new Macbook Pro and iMac announced by Apple on October 24 heralds a major shift in the way PCs will be designed and have a cumulative impact on digital filmmaking.



Below are some of the major upgrades that affect the digital filmmaking process:

1.    No Optical Drive: Both the new Macbook Pro with retina display and the new iMac have done away with the DVD drive, with Apple calling it  obsolete in the age of blazing broadband speeds when movies and television can be easily streamed online or downloaded. The new iMac does have 2 Thunderbolt ports and 4 USB 3.0 ports to allow connection of external hard drives and other devices. Seeing that Apple is usually the trendsetter in computer design, we can expect competitors like HP and Dell to follow suit. This could spell the death knell for the DVD industry, and moviemakers will now be looking to go completely digital. Of course, home theatre systems and bluray players will ensure that the home video market doesn’t completely evaporate in the near future, but the transition to a more 'online' movie watching experience is surely on its way.  

2.    Much better screen resolutions: The new iMac has a full HD display (1,920 × 1,080 pixels) for the 21.5” version and 2,560 × 1,440 pixel for the 27” version. It certainly translates into a better film/video watching experience and the computer being used for watching movies and gaming more than ever. The Macbook Pro with Retina display boats of a tantalizing 2,560 x 1,600 at 227 pixels per inch. This one has four times the screen resolution of the previous 13-inch version of the MacBook Pro.

3.    Super powerful processors: The new 21.5” iMac starts with a config of Intel Core i5 Quad Core 2.7 Ghz Processor with 8GB RAM , 1GB dedicated NVIDIA graphics and 1TB hard disk. Even the Macbook Pro with Retina display is all about performance, speed and graphics. It boasts of an Intel dual-core i5 Ivy Bridge processor clock at 2.5 Ghz (minimum) For graphics it has the Intel HD 4,000 graphics support. The RAM is 8 GB and its all-flash storage has three configurations available: 256 GB, 512 GB, or 768 GB. Such top-end configurations in the base models bode well for popular film editing applications like Final Cut Pro.  Apple will be looking to release an even more powerful version of its flagship video editing app to utilize the full potential of its new line of computer devices.

The rise of smartphones and tablets coupled with faster broadband speeds have already given a fillip to the various kinds of digital filmmaking, both in terms of production and post production.  Apple’s new line of smart computers will be prove to be another turning point, particularly because the optical drive has been dropped across its iMac and Macbook Pro ranges.

What do you think of Apple’s new devices, and their potential impact on filmmaking?

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26 October 2012, 1:04 pm 011880692e3f5039023c6a19fbf277a8
<![CDATA[George Clooney honoured at Palm Springs Film Festival]]> Found: awards, award

George Clooney will receive the Chairman's Award for his acting work in The Descendants and his directing of The Ides of March at the 2012 Palm Springs International Film Festival.

The award will be presented on January 7 at PSIFF's annual Awards Gala, a black-tie event that always hands out an array of awards to luminaries who figure to be in the Oscar race.

Like the awards given at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in late January, the Palm Springs event has become a valuable stop on the Oscar campaign trail. Previous recipients of the Chairman's Award include Dustin Hoffman, Nicole Kidman and Ben Affleck.

Oscar-nominated actress Michelle Williams will also be rewarded for her portrayal of Marilyn Monroe in “My Week With Marilyn,” which is already generating Oscar buzz.

Williams, 31, will receive the Desert Palm Achievement Actress Award at the Palm Springs International Film Festival awards gala at the Palm Springs Convention Center. Previous recipients include Academy Award winners Natalie Portman, Marion Cotillard, Charlize Theron and Kate Winslet.

“My Week With Marilyn,” which opens Wednesday in limited distribution, premiered Oct. 9 at the New York International Film Festival. Directed by Simon Curtis, the film was presented Nov. 6 as part of the AFI Fest at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, where Monroe put her hand and footprints in cement in 1952.

The Palm Springs International Film Festival runs Jan. 5-16 2012 at various venues in Palm Springs

Sources: mydesert.com & Reuters

Technorati Tags: ,

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23 November 2011, 9:20 am ac83454604d81558e40a5489757995b8
<![CDATA[Final Cut Pro X released]]> Found: calls, call
Apple has released Final Cut Pro X, the latest version of its professional video-editing software and one of the most popular programs for digital filmmaking.
Its actually been two days since FCP X was launched, and of course there’s been a strong buzz about it in the market. Video professionals were not only impressed with the new features, but with the new price too. Final Cut Pro X is available in the Mac App Store for $299.99. Compare that to 2009, when the fully loaded Final Cut Studio retailed for $999.99.

Final Cut Pro X is a big update for the powerful editing suite, in no small part because it is now (finally) built with 64-bit support. That means that the app will be able to take advantage of the additional memory space in Mac OS X Snow Leopard and the upcoming Mac OS X Lion.

Installing Final Cut Pro X
Since the only way to get Final Cut Pro X is through the Mac App Store, installation is easy: You just click "Buy" in the store, and the app's icon appears in your Finder, ready to run. You'll be able to install it on five Macs, and you receive updates automatically. The program requires at least a Core 2 Duo-based Mac running Snow Leopard, a decent video processor, 2.4GB of disk space, and 2GB RAM (4GB recommended).


The big new feature is called the Magnetic Timeline, which takes a trackless approach to editing. Like Adobe, Apple has also put a lot of effort into what it calls Content Auto-Analysis, which is another way of saying that the software uses meta-tags to better organize and import content, based on shot type, media format and other information.

Check out this video Apple released to show off the new features in Final Cut Pro X:



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24 June 2011, 11:11 am 828ed496d384fb6fa2923179133ff492
<![CDATA[Shortie Awards Youth Film Festival]]> Found: submit, awards, award, entries


Hollyn Randolph just mailed me in about the forthcoming Shortie Awards film festival.

The Shortie Awards film festival will be held June 5, 2011 in Arlington, VA a suburb of Washington D.C. The Shortie Awards recognizes original short film productions created by student filmmakers, ages 7-18, and their teachers.

This year we have entries from 26 states and 14 countries and India has 36 entries which is the largest number from outside of the US.
Apparently the last date for submitting the entries was April 1, 2011. But we can look forward to the screenings and the winners. Those who live around Arlingtom and Washington DC should attend the event!

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6 May 2011, 5:28 am eaf309efd7724c81c4b80892e456a4ca
<![CDATA[Short Film: Damn Your Eyes]]> Found: awards, award

David Guglielmo, an alumni of School of Visual Arts, New York emailed me his short film titled Damn Your Eyes.
damn your eyes

Damn Your Eyes a Spaghetti Western-influenced revenge film shot on the Sony EX1 digital camera in the NY Metropolitan area for $5,000. It has been successful at film festivals and recently won two awards.


WINNER: "Best Student Film" at Royal Flush Festival '09
WINNER: "Best More Than Horror Short" at Buffalo Screams Horror Festival '10


I liked the visual quality of the film: the lighting, the locations, set, framing, composition etc. The DoP used the Sony EXI camcorder given to him pretty well. Most of the actors did a really professional job and that took the movie experience a notch higher. The screenplay could have been written better. Some of the moments in the movie were clichéd and boring but on the whole it is a decent production. What do you think of the movie? Please watch and comment (feed subscribers will need to visit the blog to watch it).

David Guglielmo must be congratulated for doing his excellent direction. Considering he is relatively new to this profession, he has done a laudable job that commands appreciation.
 Digital filmmaking is indeed growing from strength to strength.

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26 April 2011, 5:52 am 776bfdbc7b6be1364d824c007ec92690
<![CDATA[Tribeca Film Festival Launches Online Version]]> Found: submit
I had recently blogged about Tribeca Film Festival's announcement of filmmaking grants for funding documentaries of social significance. Well now it has gone a step further further launched an online version of the increasingly popular movie fest.

According to Hollywood Reporter, the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival, which kicks off from April 20 and ends on May 1 in New York city, will have a new online component where audiences will be able to watch live streams of events and interact with other audience members.

Online audiences will also be allowed to submit questions to a host of festival executives and other notable guests and access detailed information on all of the online fest filmmakers. There will also be a Future of Film blog that will include posts from film and technology experts.

If you want to know about the screenings at Tribeca 2011, check out the Tribeca Film Festival 2011 film guide .

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23 March 2011, 7:50 pm 0c4b2e928c429528894ee3a1ebb2055c
<![CDATA[Salon Films launches filmmaker training program]]> Found: opportunity
Salon Films will launch a cross-border training program for young Singapore and Hong Kong filmmakers, and a funding initiative in connection with the Hong Kong government subsidy for filmmakers.

The training program is organized with the Media Development Authority of Singapore to bring budding Singaporean filmmakers to work in Hong Kong and China.

The program began in Hong Kong, in partnership with the Academy of Film of the Hong Kong Baptist University, and continues in Beijing, Shanghai, Suzhou, in cooperation with the China Film Foundation and CCTV, and will conclude in the Hengdian studio, lasting three weeks in each city.

The film crew is shooting a documentary to commemorate the 20th anniversary the establishment of economic relations between China and Singapore.

"Asian culture shares common origins," Wang said, "The training program is aimed at providing an opportunity for young filmmakers across Asia to meet, exchange ideas, and make films that speak to our mutual cultural roots."

To capitalize on the current prevalence of Hong Kong-Chinese co-productions and the growing film industry in China, the program also intends for young filmmakers and film students to obtain hands-on practical experience in China.

Film students at the Academy of Film of the Baptist University will also join the Salon team in Beijing and Hengdian.

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10 January 2011, 10:02 am 2c1f2abad90e1b3a777f8cf10e1b2292
<![CDATA[Tribeca announces filmmaking grants]]> Found: submission, deadline, award
The Tribeca Film Institute announced Wednesday its submission period for grants is now open. TFI will award more than $500,000 in filmmaker support through 2011 and more than $100,000 through its new TFI Documentary Fund, presented by HBO.


The Gucci Tribeca Documentary Fund provides finishing grants totaling $100,000 to feature-length documentaries that highlight and humanize topics of social significance. The TFI Sloan Filmmaker Fund will award up to $140,000 to support compelling narrative filmmaking that explores scientific, mathematic and technological themes.

The Tribeca All Access Program will continue cultivating relationships between filmmakers from traditionally underrepresented communities and film industry executives, and provide each 2011 participant with $10,000. And, the TFI Latin America Media Arts Fund will support film and video artists working in narrative or documentary film and living in Mexico, Central and South America.


“We are excited to expand the reach and depth of our programming to support individual artists in the field,”
 said TFI artistic director Beth Janson.


The early submission deadline is Nov. 8; final deadline is Dec. 8. More info: tribecafilminstitute.org.

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17 September 2010, 2:08 pm 0d32c63914b979f28151b88278a36904
<![CDATA[Taiwan's Tsai Liang is Asian Filmmaker of the Year]]> Found: awards, award, jury
South Korea's most prestigious film festival said Wednesday it has chosen Taiwanese director Tsai Ming Liang as its Asian Filmmaker of the Year.


The Pusan International Film Festival praised Tsai's work over the past three decades for pioneering unexplored areas that overcome the limitations of the art film industry.

"His 30-year-long devotion to filmmaking has greatly influenced Asian cinema and made considerable contributions to enhance the global status of Asian cinema," it said in a statement.


"He is renowned for seeking fresh ways of communicating with his audience... We can find the root of his endless spirit of challenging himself and the borderlines of art in his earlier works in the 1990s."

Malaysian-born Tsai is best known for "Vive L'Amour" that won the Golden Lion (best picture) award at the Venice Film Festival in 1994, and "The River" that won the Silver Bear/Special Jury Prize at the 1997 Berlin International Film Festival.


The 52-year-old has also won numerous awards with other films.

He is considered a leading exponent of the "Second New Wave" -- a group of Taiwanese directors in the 1990s who produced films with realistic and sympathetic portrayals of life rather than melodramas or action pictures.


The festival, held in the southern port city of Busan since 1996, will be staged from October 7-15 this year.

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6 September 2010, 5:47 am 3096856fd18a45600538a63171daf7c9
<![CDATA[Jumpstart Your Film and Television Career: 5 powerful TIPS on how to land more tv film jobs than you can handle]]> Found: opportunity
This is a guest post by Ian Agard of ianagard.com. Ian is a Toronto based writer/director/film producer who loves to entertain and inspire people through his movies and his filmmaking blog.



As you probably know, one of the most desirable yet challenging industries to make a living from is in the film and television industry.

By far, the most commonly asked question I receive from people throughout my six years working as actor, screenwriter, director and film producer is...how do you get into the industry and make a living?

As a film producer; I have interviewed, hired and worked with several casts and crews while making my films. It becomes quite easy to notice the difference between individuals who struggle to find film/tv work and those who make a comfortable living.

Is it about luck?

Or

Who you know?

I would like to share with you 5 POWERFUL TIPS that will help you jumpstart your film/tv career and get you on the road towards landing more paying industry work than you can handle.


TIP Number One: Be Willing To Work For Free

I know, you probably didn’t want to hear that but it’s imperative that you are willing to either work for free or very low pay. It’s a sacrifice that many in the entertainment industry must do when starting out, however, you’ll have the opportunity to meet others in the business as well as learn on the job. Taking “free” jobs quickly leads to full time careers.


TIP Number Two: Attitude Is Everything

This is one of the most important tips regarding developing a successful film/tv industry career. More important than your talent, your experience or your education; your attitude will determine how far you will rise within your career.
It will determine if people will refer job opportunities to you or hire you again for future projects. You must be a flexible, professional, team oriented person who is committed to “serving” the story/project to the best of your ability.

Production sets are full of egos, there’s no need for one more.

TIP Number Three: Recognize and seizure opportunity

You’ve probably heard the old saying luck is when preparation meets opportunity. I like to believe in a slightly different statement, luck = opportunity + willingness.
A certain film/tv industry work opportunity might present itself to you; you’re prepared...but are you willing to maybe work for free, work for low pay, work 12 hour days, be team-oriented, be flexible and agreeable or go the extra mile to help the project succeed.

TIP Number Four: Network and be visible

The reality of the film/TV industry is that most production jobs are never advertised. Those positions are usually filled through word of mouth and pre-established relationships. That’s why it is extremely important for you to always be committed to meeting new like-minded people.
The best places to meet and connect with people who share your zeal and passion are:

1) Onset while shooting a movie or television show
2) Through industry specific classes
3) At film festivals

TIP Number Five: Always be learning

As humans, we are learning machines. We are most alive and functioning closest to our potential when we are learning, adapting, adjusting and finding new ways, approaches and techniques to improve our lives (and our careers)in some way.

No matter how many years working experience you might have within the film/TV industry it would be hugely important for you to maintain a beginner’s mindset. A beginner looks constantly for one new tibit, one or more ways to expand on their current expertise.

To learn more valuable tips and in-depth advice, listen to my MP3 60 minute audio interview with film and television expert and veteran Stephen Dranitsaris at: www.ianagard.com/tv-film-jobs

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23 April 2010, 6:57 pm 0f5b78331581dc53a92c92be85a8445a
<![CDATA[Amelie Barnathan Does Space Disco]]> Found: calls, call
Amelie Barnathan Does Space Disco
Amelie Barnathan has created a series of artworks for Forage Press dedicated to the musical movement of "Space Disco," a genre of music she calls "a comet in the history of music and one of the coolest and tackiest eighties movements ever." Forage Press is a publication that celebrates the union of visual art and music, featuring an eclectic mix of creative minds who love both of these crucial art forms. Barnathan's exploration of Space Disco depicts the merging of disco music with all that is "futuristic"--robots, cosmic sounds, intergalactic themes. The costumes of these Space Disco bands followed suit, as reflected in these funky, bizarre drawings. 

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31 July 2014, 5:09 am 3fabfb8cfa9ecc1532b0ca9c2503071f
<![CDATA[The Strathmore Fine Artists in Residence initiative]]> Found: opportunity, residency, residence, deadline
Deadline: September 8, 2014

There is not enough that I can say to recommend The Strathmore Fine Artists in Residence initiative (Fine AIR) to all emerging artists.... I have been lucky enough to have been a mentor twice, and can therefore testify what a boost to an artist's career this program is... and it deals and teaches so many diverse areas.... there is nothing even close to it in the DMV, maybe even the nation.

It was established to help cultivate local visual arts talent by connecting established professionals in all aspects of the field with up-and-coming artists.  Emerging artists will be in residence in the Mansion at Strathmore from January – August 2015. During this time, each artist will have the opportunity to develop an audience in the DC metropolitan area, perfect their craft, create and implement an outreach, educational, or special event proposal for Strathmore’s consideration, and premiere a new body of artwork, including a collaborative piece with one’s mentor, commissioned by Strathmore in a culminating exhibition.

The exhibition of new work will take place in August of 2015 and will reflect the artistic growth of the artist in residence.  Throughout the residency artists meet with a professional artist mentor for career guidance and artistic critique; attend career development workshops; and have the opportunity to teach, lecture, volunteer, exhibit or otherwise participate in Strathmore visual arts programming. Apply here: http://www.strathmore.org/education/series/view.asp?id=10102314

Eligibility:
The Strathmore Fine Artist in Residence Program is open to all emerging visual artists.  All media accepted.
Fine AIR Program Timeline
•             September 8, 2014   Deadline for application
•             September 15 – 18, 2014  Select applicants invited to interview
•             September 29, 2014   Notification of acceptance
•             October 2014   Fine AIR contracts finalized
•             November 2014  Incoming Fine AIR class announced to the public
•             January 2015   Official start of the Fine AIR program
•             August 2015   Exhibition of new work

A Residency at Strathmore includes:
•             An exhibition of new work at the Mansion at Strathmore, Summer 2015
•             Strathmore’s consideration of an outreach, educational, or special event proposal
•             A professional artist mentor throughout the residency
•             Career Development workshops and experiences provided by Strathmore
•             A stipend of $1,000 (Studio space and housing are not available with this residency)

Artist responsibilities include:
•             Mandatory attendance at a Fine AIR welcome event, scheduled meetings with artist mentor, and career development workshops provided by Strathmore.
•             Creation of a new body of saleable work, including a collaborative piece created with one’s mentor, to debut at the 2015 Fine AIR Exhibition at the Mansion at Strathmore.
•             Creation of an outreach, educational, or other visual arts event proposal for Strathmore’s consideration for future seasons.
•             Volunteering at “Discover Strathmore” and “Strathmore Arts Festival” events and by providing an artist demonstration, pop- up of artwork for exhibition and/or sale, or related artistic presence.
•             Volunteer to teach, lecture, and/or demo for the visual art department at least once during residency.  Strathmore charges admission for these programs and all proceeds go toward supporting the Fine AIR program.

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29 July 2014, 9:56 pm acc5959e24dd8bb1bc45f2b69d134025
<![CDATA[Opportunity for artists]]> Found: call, deadline, juror, entry, entries
My good bud Al Miner, who used to roam these regions, and who is also a kick-ass artist, and thus was included in the first volume of my books on DC area artists, is the juror for this show up in the Soviet Socialist Republic of Massachusetts.
Deadline: September 15, 2014 CALL FOR WORKS ON PAPER South Shore Art Center in Cohasset, MA, invites entries of original work that offer distinctive imaginative imagery using paper. Show dates October 24 - December 21, 2014. Opening Reception October 24 6-8pm Juried by Al Miner, Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. $1200 in prizes - all work must be for sale. Entry fee. Details: 781-383-2787 OR https://client.smarterentry.com/SSAC

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23 July 2014, 5:30 am 72a6e14e6fcf4f215fad74ed297d9dbb
<![CDATA[Gateway CDC Receives $100,000 from NEA]]> Found: call, awarded, award
Good news in this news release!
National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Chairman Jane Chu announced plans to award 66 Our Town grants totaling $5.073 million and reaching 38 states in the Our Town program's fourth year of funding. Gateway Community Development Corporation(CDC) is one of those recommended organizations and will receive $100,000 to fund Phase 3 of the Art Lives Here initiative. The goal of Art Lives Here is to boost vibrancy in the Prince George's County Gateway Arts District using a mix of short and long term projects to support existing small businesses, attract commercial in-fill, prepare for the next round of commercial development, and further strengthen our diverse and streetwise creative communities. In Phase 3, the initiative will launch a Creative Enterprise Incubator in the prominent retail space of the Artspace Artist Lofts on the Mount Rainier circle.

This year's Our Town projects demonstrate again that excellent art is as fundamental to a community's success as land-use, transportation, education, housing, infrastructure, and public safety, helping build stronger communities that are diverse in geography and character. Our Town funds arts-based community development projects in a way that is authentic, equitable, and augments existing local assets. Since Our Town's inception in 2011 and including these projects, the NEA will have awarded 256 Our Town grants totaling more than $21 million in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The Creative Enterprise Incubator will convert a long under-utilized commercial space at the Artspace Mount Rainier Artist Lofts into a vibrant hub of activity to serve arts-related and retail businesses and provide a comprehensive set of resources that will enhance opportunities for the creative economy to thrive. Purpose-built for arts usage, the available space includes 4,000 square feet of open and flexible gallery storefront, room for a mix of private commercial artists studios and offices, a large classroom space, and a residents' gallery. Artspace will build out the space and a committed team of partners, artists, professional arts managers and business leaders will equip the incubator with a self-sustaining structure that brings a curriculum, services and resources to the Gateway Arts District's creative communities.

"Gateway Community Development Corporation demonstrates the best in creative community development and whose work will have a valuable impact on its community," said Chairman Chu. "Through Our Town funding, arts organizations continue to spark vitality that support neighborhoods and public spaces, enhancing a sense of place for residents and visitors alike."

Art Lives Here (ALH) began with an NEA grant of $50,000 to Joe's Movement Emporium to focus on artist-driven strategies to support small business development in Mount Rainier's historic but distressed town center. In phase I (June 2012-June 2013) the initiative (a) engaged citizens through participatory public arts projects; (b) facilitated partnerships to place competitively-selected arts projects in under-performing storefronts to enliven  the space and attract locals and visitors downtown; (c) hosted Soup Nites where local donations were matched 10:1 to support creative business developments; and (d) established a downtown arts season and visibility campaign that swirled public art, social media, street marketing and multimedia into the stock of existing events.

Designed to progress in seasons and up the Gateway corridor, phase 2 was funded with $240,000 by ArtPlace America to Joe's Movement Emporium (July 2013-December 2014) to continue the visibility campaign developed in phase I and to extend it to neighboring towns in the arts district with projects based on the Mount Rainier pilot. In phase 2, the ALH initiative is: (e) hosting Better Block projects in Brentwood and North Brentwood near two active Redevelopment Authority sites; (f) competitively funding pop-up installations and performances woven into existing arts district events; and (g) working with local multimedia professionals to produce a series of artist profiles and spark a multimedia production micro-industry. ALH partners have also undertaken smaller scale urban design projects, including: (h) commissioning a series of 30+ place-making murals throughout the arts district; (i) locally producing boulevard signage for businesses and art spaces; and (j) public works projects around storm drains in partnership with the Department of Environmental Resources. Partners for ALH phase 2 include Art Works Now, Gateway CDC, Hyattsville CDC, Joe's Movement Emporium, Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Prince George's African American Museum and Cultural Center, Prince George's Arts and Humanities Council, and Red Dirt Studio.

"Through the Art Lives Here initiative, our team has strengthened its economic, social, and political ties, already attracting more positive attention to the Gateway Arts District," said Gateway CDC Executive Director Carole Bernard. "With a new round of long-awaited arts-integrated facilities through the two-mile stretch of historic U.S. Route 1, our four large mixed-use development projects over the next 36 months will bring new density, new businesses and an anticipated increased interest in property in the corridor. At this exciting time in the arts district's history, we need to focus on our local businesses and creative communities more than ever and form collaborative infrastructures for new creative enterprises that will enhance opportunities for continued economic growth and sustainability."

"The City of Mount Rainier is pleased to partner with Gateway CDC on phase 3 of Art Lives Here," said Mount Rainier Mayor Malinda Miles. "By activating a commercial space within our business district and converting it into a creative enterprise incubator, our many local artists and businesses will receive critical resources and services that will help them grow and maintain their presence in a changing economic environment."

"Artspace has a long history of investment in facilities across the country that support the arts, and we are excited to work with Gateway CDC, the City of Mount Rainier and the communities of the arts district to pilot this new incubator," said Artspace Senior Vice President of Properties Greg Handberg. "Artspace is proud to be a partner on this NEA grant where we can activate our commercial space and be a part of helping our artist residents and other local businesses move their businesses forward in a community-focused initiative."

"The Prince George's County Redevelopment Authority has invested millions of dollars into the Gateway Arts District because we know what this area and the surrounding communities have to offer," said Redevelopment Authority Executive Director Howard Ways. "We are excited about this project and our partnership with Gateway CDC, and the County looks forward to being a part of the continued community revitalization strategies within the arts district."

The NEA received 275 applications for Our Town this year. Recommended grant amounts ranged from $25,000 to $200,000. For a complete listing of projects recommended for Our Town grant support, please visit the NEA web site at arts.gov. Project descriptions, grants listed by state and by project type, and resources are available as well.

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22 July 2014, 5:00 am 0f0dd3100552bd1924ed1dd55b83a506
<![CDATA[The DMV at AU this summer]]> Found: awards, award
Exhibits at the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center this summer focus on the art and artists and collectors in Washington, D.C. Exhibits open June 14 and run through Aug. 17.

Passion for Prints
Passionate Collectors: The Washington Print Club at 50 features almost 150 prints selected from Washington collections. The collection reveals a diversity of techniques from relief printing by celebrated masters Durer, van Dyck, Carracci, Pissarro, Picasso and Chuck Close to monoprints by contemporaries Richard Estes, Ventura Salimbeni, Thomas Frye, Adolphe Appian, Reinhard Hilker and Keiko Hara. Among the contemporary works is a print involving buckshot, and one created with 4,225 small black dots.
“Viewers will be surprised there are no dominating genres or periods or artists represented in this show, but rather a huge range of works that are national, international and local,” said AU Museum Director and Curator Jack Rasmussen. “We share our location in the nation’s capital with most international diplomatic missions to the United States. Washington is a community with diverse interests and affiliations and may well provide the most diverse group of collectors in the country.”

The show will also feature “Midwest Matrix,” a film study of post-World War II printmaking to present, produced and directed by Susan Goldman.
The Washington Print Club was established in 1964 as an independent, nonprofit volunteer organization consisting of both collectors and practicing artists. This biennial exhibition celebrates the club’s 50th anniversary.
 

Lives Devoted to Art 
The Franz and Virginia Bader Fund: Second Act features paintings, sculptures and works on paper by Richard Cleaver, Emilie Brzezinski, Fred Folsom and other artists who received grants totaling $670,000 over the last 13 years from the Bader Fund. Legendary Washington art dealer Franz Bader and his wife, Virginia, started the fund, which continues to support the arts long after the couple’s deaths in 1994 and 2001, respectively. The fund committee awards grants for artists 40 and older who live within 150 miles of the U.S. Capitol.
The first exhibition of Bader Fund artists took place a decade ago. “Second Act” provides another viewing of the range and quality of work supported by the grants.
Franz Bader was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1903. Bader and his first wife, Antonia, were fortunate to escape Vienna after the takeover of Austria by Nazi Germany in 1938, arriving in Washington in early 1939 with few possessions and little money. But, as is true of so many émigrés from Hitler’s Europe, their arrival was America’s good fortune—Washington's, in particular. Working at first with the Whyte Bookstore and Gallery and then, from 1953 to 1985, at his own art and book shop, Bader was a pioneer and creator of a vibrant art scene in his adopted city.
 

Personal Drifts of Culture
Continental Drift surveys the work of Washington artist Judy Byron, and invites the viewer to consider the visual and auditory environment that informs identity. The exhibition acknowledges the artist’s drifting of visual influences between three specific countries: Brazil, China, and Ghana. From 2010 through 2012, Byron traveled abroad and photographed details of sidewalks, toys, products, netting, foliage, clothing and detritus. Images from her travels formed the point of departure for 18 color pencil drawings.
Accompanying the drawings are the voices of three women from Brazil, China, and Ghana who now live in the Metro D.C. area and have established roots while maintaining strong identification with their places of birth. Three smaller drawings — Memories of Home — are based on photos Byron took of objects in their homes that remind the women of the homes they left behind. The sound of ocean waves lapping the shore can be heard throughout the exhibition space.
Rasmussen observed:  “I don’t think any artist has communicated so beautifully the interaction of community and environment in the construction of culture.”
 

Nature’s Fleeting Beauty
Syzygy, William Newman’s series of 19 oil paintings and digital images, and two metal sculptures, is a vibrant investigation of temporality, subjective freedom, and natural splendor. The photographs, photorealist paintings and stainless steel sculptures present striking natural forms and places holding personal resonance for Newman, including Yellowstone National Park, the Grand Canyon and the cosmos.
For his sculptures, Newman had natural artifacts from his farmhouse in Shenandoah County duplicated in welded, polished stainless steel by craftsmen in Beijing. The resulting forms gracefully blend elements of abstraction with Newman’s mastery of representational expression. 

This tactile sensibility is also evident in Newman’s conjunction of paintings and photographs. The central subjects of his paintings are round forms from nature, which Newman and his assistants meticulously recreated from photographs that he took himself or appropriated from NASA’s public archives. Newman then conjoined the objects with photographs using rare-earth magnets. Photographs that took just a click to create and paintings that took years to make join to represent nature’s fleeting beauty, its life through memory and desire, and its timeless eternal renewal.

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18 July 2014, 4:00 am 58c768414de0cd6d644a5eee38a7ccdb
<![CDATA[Community Gateway Arch]]> Found: call
Mayor Vincent C. Gray will join representatives of the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities (DCCAH) in the dedication of the Community Gateway Arch on Friday, July 18, at a twilight ceremony, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. The program will take place outside the Unity Health Care Parkside Health Center facility, located at the corner of Hayes Street and Kenilworth Terrace NE.

"This new work of public art celebrates the District's cultural heritage," said Mayor Gray. "Artists, community members and the District government collaborated on the new installation, which represents the creativity and aspirations of Ward 7 residents."

The Community Gatewaysculpture was designed by Washington Glass School uber artists Michael Janis, Tim Tate and Erwin Timmers, who worked in collaboration with Ward 7 artist apprentice Bill Howard and numerous Ward 7 community members and stakeholders during the early phases of fabrication. The design of the public artwork was intended to mark the entrance to the Kenilworth / Parkside section of the city.

Washington Glass School was selected through an open Call to Artists and panel process led by the DCCAH, through the D.C. Creates! Public Art Program selection committee, in partnership with the D.C. Primary Care Association (DCPCA), the Unity Health Care Foundation, the Ward 7 Community and ANC 7D07 Commissioner Willie H. Woods. Central to the selection of the public artwork and the community input process was the Ward 7 Arts Collaborative, led by artist and community arts advocate Wanda Aikens.

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16 July 2014, 5:30 am f02b4e3b313e9993c4ef092e39980f17
<![CDATA[Scam Alert]]> Found: calling, call
Recently received a scam phone call from a heavily accented dude calling from the "Windows Security Center" -- this is a classic cold call scam -- the phone that showed up as coming from was (325) 477-7355.

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15 July 2014, 4:30 am fff98cce6cc5f22243d89c931aba46f1
<![CDATA[Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award]]> Found: deadline, submit, award
The deadline for 2015 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award applications is 4:30 PM on Thursday, July 24, 2014.

 The funding categories available for 2015 include:
  • Non-Classical Music: Composition
  • Non-Classical Music: Solo Performance
  • Playwriting
  • Visual Arts: Crafts 
  • Visual Arts: Photography

All applications must be submitted online. Applicants can click here to access the application, guidelines and technical assistance resources. 

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14 July 2014, 4:30 am 48c20f52f4bedb36754d470f808ba3a9
<![CDATA[Rita Moreno at the NPG]]> Found: opportunity, awards, award
This Wednesday, July 9 at 7 p.m., Rita Moreno will be at the National Portrait Gallery for a special presentation.

Moreno, actress, singer, and dancer, is the only American entertainer of Puerto Rican ancestry to have won the four major annual American entertainment awards: an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar, and a Tony (EGOT), as well as receiving the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement award. Moreno will speak about her life and career with Taína Caragol, curator of Latino art and history at the Portrait Gallery. Attendees may also have the opportunity to meet Ms. Moreno at a reception at 6 p.m.

Moreno is also represented in the special exhibition “Dancing the Dream” on the first floor.

Tickets for the program start at $15 and can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/RitaMNPG or through the Smithsonian Theaters Concessions and Attractions ticketing line at 1-866-868-7774. Tickets must be acquired in advance.

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7 July 2014, 3:00 am 70a1fd51166e4b3084e2b6cb298114fd
<![CDATA[They call it puppy love]]> Found: call

Philly photographer Chris Sembrot photographs owners kissing their dogs.

The article They call it puppy love by Erin Edinger-Turoff appeared first on The Temple News.

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8 April 2014, 2:30 am 261254b911f75c78f5275203d2c70409
<![CDATA[Art students answer the call]]> Found: call

Two Tyler students organized the “Call + Response” show.

The article Art students answer the call by Alexa Bricker appeared first on The Temple News.

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24 March 2014, 10:40 pm b9e46040fd3f252a40cde32a01045e47
<![CDATA[Residency leads to collaboration]]> Found: residency

Artist Katie Grinnan incorporated student work into her art.

The article Residency leads to collaboration by Alexa Bricker appeared first on The Temple News.

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19 November 2013, 7:40 am d972cc21ef1092d3030948723d5ad79c
<![CDATA[A View from the Top]]> Found: calls, call

Conrad Benner’s blog calls attention to Philly’s street art culture.

The article A View from the Top by Patricia Madej appeared first on The Temple News.

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22 October 2013, 7:00 am ab22eb0314161cf2be5d7d6f820607e1
<![CDATA[Philly art contest asks users to Instagram]]> Found: calls, call

Visit Philly is teaming up with the campaign With Art Philadelphia for a contest that calls for some creativity. The organization is utilizing social media by encouraging Instagram and Twitter users to take photos of Philadelphia art and apply the hashtag “#PhillyArtContest.” Caroline Bean, the director of social media at Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation, helped make the new photo contest come alive.…

The article Philly art contest asks users to Instagram by Chelsea Finn appeared first on The Temple News.

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10 September 2013, 4:40 am 1c36f7c1b192bef403a011270d66bf79
<![CDATA[3rd Street Gallery’s Philadelphia Community Exhibit puts local talent on display]]> Found: submit

Local artists of any skill level could submit art to the gallery's Philadelphia Community Exhibit, which opens to the public today, Jan. 30.

The article 3rd Street Gallery’s Philadelphia Community Exhibit puts local talent on display by Cheyenne Shaffer appeared first on The Temple News.

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30 January 2013, 12:29 pm dedc6f2fab4e4f28c26b1f2276af465e
<![CDATA[‘RAW’ talent showcased in awards ceremony]]> Found: awards, award

The RAW Awards will showcase design talent in Philadelphia, with winners advancing to compete on a national level.

The article ‘RAW’ talent showcased in awards ceremony by Taylor Farnsworth appeared first on The Temple News.

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13 November 2012, 6:40 am e65a42447086a34bf10b9436822cb259
<![CDATA[Art Zone with Nancy Guppy 5/23/2014]]> Found: residency
In 1985, Nancy Nordhoff created Hedgebrook -- one of the few residency programs in the world exclusively dedicated to supporting the creative process of women writers.

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23 May 2014, 4:00 am c7bcadaaa46df50100bf901d9d357355
<![CDATA[Art Zone with Nancy Guppy 10/4/2013]]> Found: awards, award
Art Zone celebrates Earshot Jazz Festival making it to a quarter century. Pippi Longstocking slides across the Seattle Children`s Theatre stage. Cuong Vu Trio improvises in the Art Zone studio. Singer Naomi Wachira talks lyrics. Kook Teflon brings in "psycho dolls," and we get a backstage postcard from the Seattle Stranger Genius Awards.

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4 October 2013, 4:00 am 400c81b24edf1342c42a7a5f09a97906
<![CDATA[Kasimir Malevich's 'Black Square': What does it say to you?]]> Found: opportunity

The painting itself sits in a relatively darkened room at Tate Modern, where a major retrospective of the career of its creator, Kasimir Malevich from Kiev, opens today. Given that the painting is black from top to toe and hip to hip, and that it is often said to represent a pivotal moment in the history of abstraction and the art of the 20th century, this strikes the onlooker as an odd decision. Why not be given the opportunity to see it as clearly as possible?

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15 July 2014, 7:00 pm 952c9347a0546661a97d3effee8139fa
<![CDATA[Stunning photos from the National Geographic Travel photography contest]]> Found: entries

Extraordinary entries for a travel photography competition were unveiled on Tuesday – including a man canoeing past dripping globules of molten lava, and a giraffe towering through a window to polish off some crumbs left on a plate. 

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17 June 2014, 6:50 pm 9d2882cb3b45845552bed56285415344
<![CDATA[Portfolio: Californian Austen Ezzell spent five months photographing football pitches around the globe for his project The World's Game]]> Found: calls, call

The United States is hardly known for its love of "the beautiful game", seemingly more in thrall to the pleasures of baseball and American football. But for Californian Austen Ezzell, football – or soccer, as he calls it – was always his sport of choice.

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24 May 2014, 7:00 pm 8153139ab600c402475101472fdbcd8f
<![CDATA[Aiko Tezuka, artist: 'History is interwoven in the fabric. I decided to mix cultures and to make layers']]> Found: residency

Aiko Tezuka came to Europe from her native Japan in 2010, first to London and then to Berlin, on a Künstlerhaus Bethanien Residency. She now lives and works in a flat in the fashionable Neukölln area in southeast Berlin.

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22 May 2014, 10:00 am 5ce1d899b2f5a0d8dc056b122de1ed64
<![CDATA[The supersized cultural life of Abu Dhabi]]> Found: call

They do things (slightly) differently in the Emirates. Today, the Al Raha Beach Theatre in Abu Dhabi will host the grand final of the most popular TV talent contest not just in the UAE but across much of the Arab world. Its elimination format, which attracts up to 15 million viewers, in many ways resembles the spotlit stage ordeals of Pop Idol, The Voice or The X Factor. There's even a diva-like psychologist – Nadia Buhannad – on hand to interrogate the quivering (and mostly male) contestants. "They call me intimidating," Dr Buhannad recently told the local press. "I say, 'Queen of Intimidating'."

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19 May 2014, 7:00 pm 3468bb8e9de9134e7513e497f234ae36
<![CDATA[Look out Lena Dunham, here comes mom! Laurie Simmons is set to direct a movie with a 'small role' for the creator of Girls]]> Found: award

Creativity definitely runs in Girls star and creator Lena Dunham's family. Her mum, Laurie Simmons, has been nominated for the prestigious Prix Pictet photography award, along with 10 other leading photographers from all over the world, who are competing for the prize of £67,000. The winner will be announced on 21 May at London's Victoria & Albert Museum, followed by an exhibition of their work.

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14 May 2014, 6:00 pm c4cc886e0508ab1a3658acb8507d12c2
<![CDATA[The Holy Lake]]> Found: entre

poster for The Holy Lake
The Holy Lake
at Entre Deux (Ichigaya, Kagurazaka area)
(2014-05-31 - 2014-07-31)

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6e034d2aa191ab837eec2e77bc12fe17
<![CDATA[Kei Ono “New Text”]]> Found: award

poster for Kei Ono “New Text”
Kei Ono “New Text”
at Place M (Shinjuku area)
(2014-07-28 - 2014-08-03)

[Related Event] Society of Photography Award Party Date: August 2(Sat) 17:00- Admission: ¥2000

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a59797e3cd3fbb8d0ca5542ab6eb96af
<![CDATA[Masayuki Furukawa “Diary”]]> Found: opportunity

poster for Masayuki Furukawa “Diary”
Masayuki Furukawa “Diary”
at Voilld (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2014-07-18 - 2014-08-03)

The London-based photographer Masayuki Furukawa has done advertising, commercial, music video, and magazine work in Japan and abroad. His first exhibition is a special opportunity to see a portion of his enormous body of work from all over the world. A film Furukawa made in collaboration with director Eri Sawatari will also be screened.

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6b8b5327ea7e69563a7fd387b6038015
<![CDATA[World Press Photo 14]]> Found: submit, awarded, award, entries

poster for World Press Photo 14
World Press Photo 14
at Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography (Ebisu, Daikanyama area)
(2014-06-07 - 2014-08-03)

Each year, World Press Photo invites photographers throughout the world to participate in the World Press Photo Contest, the premier international competition in photojournalism, with prize winning work going on to tour across 100 cities across the world. In 2014, 5,754 photographers from 132 countries submitted 98,671 entries. This year the grand prize has been awarded to John Stanmeyer for “Djibouti City, Djibouti”, depicting African migrants on the shore of Djibouti City at night raising their phones in an attempt to catch cheap yet weak signal from neighboring Somalia, revealing an earnest pursuit of communication with relatives left in surrounding counties. Venue: B1F Exhibition Space [Related Event] Photo Documentary Workshop Date: July 19(Sat) 10:00-, July 20(Sun) 10:00-, July 21(Mon) 10:00- Instructors: Q Sakamaki (photographer), Toshiki Toyama(Aera Photo Director) Suitable for professional photojournalists, editors all those wishing to become so Venue: 1F Atelier (Creative Space) Admission: ¥20000 For further information please refer to the official website. [Image: John Stanmeyer]

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dc0e989b4ae1aa79de09aa16a647f7c1
<![CDATA[The Mysteries of the Moon]]> Found: opportunity

poster for The Mysteries of the Moon
The Mysteries of the Moon
at Konica Minolta Plaza (Shinjuku area)
(2014-07-15 - 2014-08-10)

Through 3-D models, panels, and images, this exhibition introduces basic knowledge of the moon and astronomical phenomena, as well as mysteries surrounding them, providing “views” of the moon not normally seen. Ahead of the total lunar eclipse coming up on October 8th, this is an opportunity to deepen your understanding of this familiar celestial body. [Related Event] Ask Anything Corner Speakers: Eiichiro Kokubo (Professor of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan), Junya Terazono (Assistant Professor at the University of Aizu, Research Center for Advanced Information Science and Technology) Date: Aug. 2 (Sat) 14:00–16:00 Venue: Konica Minolta Plaza Gallery A Talk by Junichi Watanabe (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan Vice President) Date: Aug. 10 (Sun) 14:00–16:00 Please see the venue’s website for details.

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2545bd908ec649a08964508f522d4a0f
<![CDATA[“Semamori - Stitched Amulets on the Back of Children’s Kimonos - “]]> Found: award

poster for “Semamori - Stitched Amulets on the Back of Children’s Kimonos - “
“Semamori - Stitched Amulets on the Back of Children’s Kimonos - “
at LIXIL Gallery 1 & 2 (Kyobashi, Nihonbashi area)
(2014-06-05 - 2014-08-23)

Introducing the special forms of kimono popular up to the early Showa period with “Semamori” emblems designed to protect a child’s well-being and “Hyakutoku-kimono” created from cloth gathered from 100 people in a particular form of prayer, this exhibition features various examples and documents relating to this form of kimono, along with photographic produced by Miyako Ishuchi since winning the Shiju Hosho award. 「Related Event] Lecture “The World of Semamori” Date: July 29(Tues) 18:30-20:00 Speaker: Yukari Saji(director of Koriyama City Museum of Art) Venue: AGC Studio (Tokyo Chuo-ku Kyobashi 2-15-18 Kyobashi Souseikan 2F * 1 min from LIXIL) Admission: Free For further information on reservations please refer to the official website

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57e350e33a65aaed5ccc0066cfdb9ab4
<![CDATA[TYIN Tegnestue Architects “Human - Architecture -“]]> Found: awarded, award

poster for TYIN Tegnestue Architects “Human - Architecture -“
TYIN Tegnestue Architects “Human - Architecture -“
at Gallery Ma (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2014-07-10 - 2014-09-20)

believing in architecture as a resource for improving the living of local people the young Norwegian architect unit TYIN Tegnestue Architects, consisting of Yashar Hanstad and Andreas Grontvedt Gjertsen, continue to develop projects in provincial regions, from the borders of Thailand and Myanmar to the rainforests of Sumatra, often collaborating with local residents and drwing on the support of staff and students of the university of Trondheim – NTNU. In 2012 they were awarded the Global Award for Sustainable Architecture and have shown a clear commitment to architecture rooted in social development. This exhibition features maquettes, photographs and moving images from their “Human Toolkit” projects. [Related Event] TYIN Tegnestue Architects Lecture “People Projects Processes” Date: July 10(Thurs) 18:30-20:30 Venue: Tsuda Hall Capacity: 490 participants *For details on reservations please refer to the official website.

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be711a63531218763252592fd0ce5151
<![CDATA[Tsuneko Taniuchi “Micro-Events”]]> Found: call, residence

poster for Tsuneko Taniuchi “Micro-Events”
Tsuneko Taniuchi “Micro-Events”
at Maison Hermès (Ginza, Marunouchi area)
(2014-07-18 - 2014-09-21)

Since 1995 Tsuneko Taniuchi has been enacting “Micro Events”, playing out through performance the various layers of society and their functions. Taking up the role of a variety of contemporary female characters, she has been known to take up the form of the “Bunny girl” in passing off ironical comments on the VIP system of art fairs and other such events, while at other times she has brought her room into the gallery and made it her living space pointing to the issues of residence rights in the city, often confronting social questions through her eclectic performances which mix acting with action, reality with fiction, conversation with exclusion, engagement and games, art and the kitsch, weaving between ideas and values in an examination of one’s right to be one’s self. 「Related Events] Micro Event No. 45 “6 Female Characters + 1 Woman / 7 Days” Taking on the roles of waitress, boxer, gymnast, ganguro, ninja and a homeless person the artist will perform her role each day, with the exception of Sunday when she will be her mere self, exchanging things her characters have made with visitors. Dates: Everyday Mon-Sat 17:00-19:00 Sun 14:00-16:00 Micro Event No. 46 “Wedding Tokyo” The latest event in Taniuchi’s Wedding Series, which has been developed since 2002, and has seen over 250 ceremonies to date. An open call is made for men and women to marry the artist and a series of 20 ceremonies will take place in the gallery. Date: August 3(Sun) For further details please refer to the official website.

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43b62bde2d8df2e73ea2c0eb702fd75f
<![CDATA[Takehito Miyatake “Japan Essential Scapes”]]> Found: award, entre

poster for Takehito Miyatake “Japan Essential Scapes”
Takehito Miyatake “Japan Essential Scapes”
at Entre Deux (Ichigaya, Kagurazaka area)
(2014-08-01 - 2014-09-30)

Japan is in fact made up of 6852 islands, and with its changing seasons is home to a myriad of changing landscapes which have fostered a unique sense of aesthetic. And yet how much are we aware of this beauty, and how well do we coexist with nature? From the rising of the sun, to its dip below the horizon and onwards into the star filled skies, these lands are filled with a kaleidoscope of nature. And this is what award winning photographer Takehito Miyatake attempts to distill in this exhibition.

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969fa18875df1ac0c4de2fa7df526cb4
<![CDATA[Yokohama Triennale Associated Program “BankArt Life 4— The Dream of East Asia”]]> Found: residency

poster for Yokohama Triennale Associated Program “BankArt Life 4— The Dream of East Asia”
Yokohama Triennale Associated Program “BankArt Life 4— The Dream of East Asia”
at BankArt Studio NYK (Yokohama, Kanagawa area)
(2014-08-01 - 2014-11-03)

[Yokohama Triennale 2014 Related Program] Art collections and works made in residency programs, including the “Ongoing Korean Correspondence” program, in historic architectural sites. Venues: BankArt 1929 and surrounding historic buildings, shops, open spaces, and empty buildings.

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bad923cc09c5883ca6c2974bf49f69d9
<![CDATA[Barry Whittaker “Throwing Things at the Sky”]]> Found: residency

poster for Barry Whittaker “Throwing Things at the Sky”
Barry Whittaker “Throwing Things at the Sky”
at 3331 Arts Chiyoda (Chiyoda area)
(2014-08-02 - 2014-08-07)

Cumulating his residency with 3331 Arts Chiyoda, Barry Whittaker (American artist active in Toledo, Ohio) will be presenting a series of digital works in this exhibition. Photography, video, interactive installation, audio, websites, and drawings are among the many methods utilized in his past works. With abundant opportunities for miscommunication while living a foreign life in Tokyo, where excessive digital communication throws messages in and out of space, Whittaker has been able to feed these experiences into his newest 3D works and soundscapes. Rm. 2013

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d33bf9a3911b6ad09db8515ba5c70c8a
<![CDATA[“Unseen Daily Life” (Part1)]]> Found: residency

poster for “Unseen Daily Life” (Part1)
“Unseen Daily Life” (Part1)
at Tokyo Wonder Site, Hongo (Chiyoda area)
(2014-08-02 - 2014-09-28)

Tokyo Wonder Site features a two part exhibition of work from 6 Japanese and international artists all incorporating familiar everyday materials into their works. In the first volume of this program showcases the work of 3 artists who have recently joined TWS’s residency programs in Stockholm, Seoul and Tokyo, evolving new vantage points through their encounter with the culture of their host city and their daily living within this. The exhibition will also be accompanied by workshops which offer up the creative possibilities of environmental sound and everyday objects. (admission free/reservation required)

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73ac8cd2b9c042bce6d6135989e56288
<![CDATA[Ichiro Kojima “To the North, From the North”]]> Found: entry

Ichiro Kojima “To the North, From the North”
at Izu Photo Museum (Greater Tokyo area)
(2014-08-03 - 2014-12-25)

This exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of Ichiro Kojima’s death. Born and raised in the northern city of Aomori, Kojima was the eldest son in a family that ran a toy and photography supply store. He learned photography under the influence of his father, and began to publish his work in photography magazines. His subjects were everyday landscapes on the Tsugaru and Shimokita peninsulas, but his work stood apart from the mainstream realism of that era and soon gained notice for its poetic and compositional sensibilities. With strong encouragement from the pioneering photojournalist Yonosuke Natori, Kojima mounted his first exhibition, Tsugaru, in Tokyo in 1958. Following this strong start, he moved to Tokyo in 1961 to pursue a career as a professional photographer, going on to present further exhibitions of work. However, having emerged on the scene with photographs of his home country, he now faced great difficulty to produce work in a new environment. After the death of Natori, his main supporter in Tokyo, Kojima returned to Aomori. From here he embarked on a new project in Hokkaido, but he began to feel ill after repeated exposure to severe conditions and sadly died at the early age of thirty-nine. This exhibition features his small photograph prints from his “Trump” series, along with works from his two major exhibitions and those which reflect his love of the North, shining new light on the short life of this artist. [Related Events] Panel Discussion To Document the North: Considering Ichiro Kojima Picking up on questions raised by the 2009 Ichiro Kojima retrospective exhibition at the Aomori Museum of Art, this discussion will examine the question of what “The North” meant to Kojima. Participants: Hiroshi Oshima (photographer) Keizo Kitajima (photographer) Shino Kuraishi (professor, Meiji University) Shigemi Takahashi (chief curator, Aomori Museum of Art) Masashi Kohara (researcher, Izu Photo Museum) Date/Time: September 28 (Sun.) 2:30–4:00 Place: Clematis no Oka Hall (near the museum) Free (exhibition ticket required for entry), limited to 100. Gallery Talk A curator will provide commentary on the exhibition. Date/Time: Saturdays at 2:15 (approx. 30 minutes) August 30, October 25, November 15, December 20

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66dd26dcae9563f2e6fe82f4012c75af
<![CDATA[7th Lake Yamanaka Photo Grand Prix]]> Found: entries

poster for 7th Lake Yamanaka Photo Grand Prix
7th Lake Yamanaka Photo Grand Prix
at Fujifilm Square (Roppongi, Nogizaka area)
(2014-08-08 - 2014-08-14)

29 photos capturing the beauty and delight of Lake Yamanaka in all seasons, selected from 540 entries.

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5842211de2b193d4f4a105498ff1b186
<![CDATA[Kiiro “Light Exhibition”]]> Found: award

poster for Kiiro “Light Exhibition”
Kiiro “Light Exhibition”
at Emon Photo Gallery (Shirokane, Hiroo area)
(2014-08-19 - 2014-09-20)

Kiiro has consistently pursued cosmos flowers throughout his photographic career for their touching, understated fragility that hides an indomitable robustness, and for the way in which they awaken distant memories. Kiiro’s premier work “Opera” received a prestigious International Fine Art Photography award. With “Light,” Kiiro continues to express a unique lyricism born of his enchantment with the various properties of flowers, and expressed through a deft mastery of the photomontage format. “Light” comes to us as a continuation of the Japanese aesthetic, so skillfully depicted in his second series “Elegance of Silence.” Various hues are captured with light particles that spread to every corner of each layered print, woven together in a way reminiscent of a tapestry. [Related Event] Dance Performance by “Flowers” featuring Yumi Yoshimoto Dates: August 23rd (Sat) 16:00 -16:40 (doors open at 15:30), September 12 (Fri) 19:30 - 20:10(doors open at 19:00)

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cf2d0e1bc02da6142aac4d1eb51a3d66
<![CDATA[Yvonne Rainer at the Getty Research Institute]]> Found: opportunity

Hunter Drohojowska-Philp says the show provides a rare opportunity to better understand a rigorous and complex artist.

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29 May 2014, 9:05 pm 6dc7c0eba27ed17dbfad6b558a289ef6
<![CDATA[The Soul of a Woman - Morehead City, North Carolina]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,300 in awards. Deadline: August 10, 2014

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85b041ae174178b5493d763709c9b43c
<![CDATA[18th Mini Print International - Ithaca, New York]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,300 in awards. Deadline: August 15, 2014

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1d39e371bbe2b95c0823a5cd324bf9b3
<![CDATA[International Juried Smart Device Photography Exhibit - Brooklyn, New York]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1500 Cash Awards. Deadline: August 16, 2014

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106e048f1bf8ee6be09d6eec0f3abf6f
<![CDATA[Neither Here nor There Photography Exhibit - Cincinnati, Ohio]]> Found: deadline, award
$1000 best of show award. Deadline: August 26, 2014

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71e6a82492a91704da7aabde9bb77247
<![CDATA[Lines into Shapes - Estes Park, Colorado]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Up to $4,000 in awards. Deadline: August 31, 2014

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16d70db8c943bce2a436dfd883351288
<![CDATA[A Show of Heads - Hudson, New York]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2200 in Direct Art Print Awards. Deadline: August 31, 2014

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afa2f921c37a1c0ae0e9a0d01f348d3e
<![CDATA[Japan Media Arts Festival - Tokyo, Japan]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
1,100,000 JPY in awards. Deadline: September 2, 2014

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7362079c9550a5ef8aa145f42bc83e3b
<![CDATA[CWA 45th National Exhibition - Pleasanton, California]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$12,000 in awards. Deadline: September 5, 2014

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761fd8b144b8cab7b595b4a8df805bc3
<![CDATA[Small Wonders: A Fine Art Small Works Exhibition - Annapolis, Maryland]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: September 10, 2014

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579325a27ca4b3423e786d5b9ed9b0d3
<![CDATA[Craft Forms 2014 - Wayne, Pennsylvania]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: September 12, 2014

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8bba200271c0ccf826dfd87d25d4e274
<![CDATA[Joshua Tree National Park Art Exposition 2014 - Twentynine Palms, California]]> Found: residence, deadline, awards, award
$6,000 in cash awards and an Artist-In-Residence award. Deadline: September 15, 2014

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dadbae2cb5cfb8224bd862245fdbe120
<![CDATA[81st Annual International Exhibition of Fine Art in Miniature - North Bethesda, Maryland]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000 in awards. Deadline: September 20, 2014

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fcd4e1e92946fefd53d708533592a33c
<![CDATA[Endangered: Art for Apes - Online contest and exhibition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,250 in awards. Deadline: October 3, 2014

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eded5608ea82174e7041faa5f063e23a
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

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31 July 2009, 4:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: call, opportunity
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Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

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Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

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1 July 2009, 7:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Hopes and Dreams, Challenges and Lies]]> Found: award

Former White House Counsel John W. Dean, one of the last major surviving figures of Watergate, reveals what President Nixon knew and when he knew it, and what happened during that mysterious 18 1/2 minute gap. When he was growing up, Brando Skyhorse was told that his father was an American Indian—but as he reveals in a new memoir, the situation is a lot more complicated. Tracy Droz Tragos discusses her award-winning documentary “Rich Hill,” about boys growing up in a struggling rural town in Missouri. She’s joined by one of the teenagers she profiles in the film. Plus, a look into the philosophical ideas that inspired America’s revolutionaries--from Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Young, who started the Boston Tea Party.

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30 July 2014, 12:00 am 270432190c641abb42ff5a5d7725924a
<![CDATA[Great Art, Dismal Politics: A Tale of Two Italies]]> Found: award

The child of Italian immigrants and an award-winning scholar of Italian literature Joseph Luzzi tells his family’s story and links it to Italy’s north-south divide and the country's passion for art, food, and family. His book My Two Italies gives an account of his Calabrian father’s time as a military internee in Nazi Germany—where he had a love affair with a local Bavarian woman. Luzzi also looks at Italy’s contradictions—it has produced some of the world’s greatest art but it also suffers from corruption, political fragmentation, and an enfeebled civil society.

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24 July 2014, 12:00 am e66874c72c70496454aef640b0a1dc25
<![CDATA[Canon In Action Photography Tour & Educational Roadshow Hits Seattle This Weekend]]> Found: opportunity, award

CIA_Banner

This weekend, June 7th & 8th, Canon is bringing their Canon in Action Tour to Seattle! The tour will be taught by Canon Explorers of Light Jack Reznicki and Jim Divitale, along with Amina Moreau of Stillmotion.
 
Jack is best known for his commercial work with companies like Hyatt and Time Magazine, as well as teaching at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. 
 
Jim’s digital photography is featured in magazines like Rangefinder and Professional Photographer and lectures at WPPI, Imaging USA, and Photoshop World.
 
Amina is the cofounder of Emmy Award-winning Stillmotion, whose client list includes Apple and CBS.
 
There is going to be a Saturday seminar and a few Sunday workshops on June 7th and 8th.
 
The Saturday seminar’s goal is to teach imaging essentials and help you understand and expand your creative options. Thoroughly understanding photography principles like ISO and aperture is essential to putting your photography ideas to practice. The Saturday seminar will cover lens choice, camera settings and features, light exposure, portraits, landscapes, HD video, and a whole lot more. We’ll learn quality vs. quantity of light, incorporating video into your image making process. Jack, Jim, and Amina are going to let you discover the possibilities in your camera so that you can discover the possibilities in your photography.
 
The Sunday workshop is an opportunity to practice your new skills, work with live models, and try out professional Canon equipment. We’re going to have interactive discussions and hands-on exercises so attendees will receive feedback for every milestone hit. The workshop is designed to give attendees the tools to create visually stunning and engaging videos and photography.

The photography portion of the workshop is going to let you practice the concepts of flash photography, like functions of Speedlites and ETTL. Since light can be unpredictable, Jim and Dave are going to work with the class on mastering light using flash.

Camera movement, audio capture, and shot sequencing are the main points the video portion of the workshop will cover. Filmmakers use this knowledge every day as the foundation to any well-made video.
 
It’s going to be a weekend packed with learning! Head over to CanonInAction.com and use the discount code CIAMZED10 for $10 off Saturday tickets!

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2 June 2014, 4:56 pm bed8f75c9c1339a7d316ebc9f05ae44b
<![CDATA[Vermeer’s Young Woman Seated at a Virginal]]> Found: opportunity
October 26, 2013 - September 30, 2014: Vermeer painted less than forty pictures during his career and this one, Young Woman Seated at a Virginal, is believed to be one of his last. It is also the only remaining canvas by this great Dutch master to be in private hands. The Museum is immensely grateful to the Leiden Collection for the exceedingly rare opportunity to display this work; indeed, it has been almost ten years since a painting by Vermeer has been on view in Philadelphia.

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26 October 2013, 12:00 am f2ec8e0659a64fabafccc1b8f6592d37
<![CDATA[Seattle Artist Ulrich Pakker Receives UNESCO Art Award]]> Found: award

We’d like to congratulate Ulrich Pakker for being selected to receive the UNESCO art award for "Inspiring Peace and Humanity Through Art and Science". Ulrich is also a premier gallery member of SeattleArtists.com.

"I am honored to be receiving this UNESCO art award from Dr. Sheree Wen, U.S. National Commissioner for UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization).  It has been a great year and this is certainly the crowning glory." says Ulrich Pakker.

If you’d like any more information on the UNESCO award or on what Ulrich has been working on lately, please visit http://www.RPArt.com.

Seattle Artist Ulrich Pakker receives UNESCO art award

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8 October 2013, 3:39 pm 4ea58d95e29d6589eb44d448a6aff0f8
<![CDATA[Taipei’s Far Eastern Plaza Reveals US$50 Million Upgrade]]> Found: award
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One of Taiwan’s leading 5-star hotels unveils phase one of its refurbishment

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First opened in 1994, Taipei’s Far Eastern Plaza Hotel remains one the most prestigious stay options in Taiwan’s capital, boasting 43 stories and an unparalleled view of the Taipei 101 skyscraper in Xinyi. But as with any hotel that’s ahead of its time, time itself catches up and new contemporary hotels have captured the imagination of new visitors to one of Asia’s most dynamic cities.

Timely then, that as of June 2014, the Shangri-La property has begun unveiling a massive refurbishment project costing NT$1.5 billion (US$ 50 million) that is set to see the 5-star hotel reestablish itself in the city.

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It’s 20 years since Far Eastern Plaza first opened its doors to reveal 420 guestrooms based on the theme of the mythical city of Shangri-La, a fictional city created by author James Hilton in his 1933 novel Lost Horizon.

Now the hotel is revamping all 420 rooms, with 240 revealed in stage one from floors 9 through 23, which was completed last month. It's the first time that the rooms have been given a makeover adding soft-tone colors and new modern features such as 40-inch LCD flat-screen TVs, a second 17-inch LCD flat screen for the bathrooms, HDMI devices to connect laptops to the screens, and high-speed Wi-Fi.

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Far Eastern Plaza is also also adding a new category, the Premier Room, with walk-through closets connecting the bedroom and bathroom.

The rooms have a homely atmosphere that suits families or long-term guests, with ample light from the windows not only showcasing a panoramic view. The feeling of a personal living room is enhanced by window side sofas, a coffee table and an ottoman sofa.

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Hong Kong’s award-winning design team AB Concept is behind the refurbishment, focusing its interior design technique on ensuring form and function.

The design team duo of founders Ed Ng and Terence Ngan previously created the concepts for the Shang Palace Cantonese restaurant and Li Bai Lounge, and this month were recognized for their redesign of the Grand Ballroom at Shangri-La, Sydney.

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“It is with much pleasure, that we proudly present the first phase of newly renovated rooms and suites featuring the hotel’s famous Sung Dynasty theme and timeless elegance, as well as a contemporary residential atmosphere with modern technology,” said The Far Eastern Plaza’s General Manager Marcel N.A. Holman

“Providing authentic services and up to date facilities is the hotel’s long-term commitment to our guests. Over the past years, we have completed a series of upgrading projects, including all restaurants, bars and lounge, ballrooms and most function rooms.  The rooms and ground floor upgrades are part of our overall plan to offer guests the ultimate luxurious and comfortable home away from home.”

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The refurbishment process is set to continue to work its way up the hotel, right to the glittering swimming pool atop the roof, taking in the 180 remaining rooms and the Presidential Suite, from May 2014 until all is unveiled in January 2015.

In addition to the room revamps, the hotel driveway, Horizon Club Lounge, the popular “The Cake Shop” bakery on the ground floor and the Lobby Court – famed for its Taiwanese Tea sets, are all due undergo thorough modernization over the next few months.

For more information: Far Eastern Plaza Hotel

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31 July 2014, 7:19 am f80beaa3815f6c3148a06f403b9a22bf
<![CDATA[Catching up with Chino Otsuka, 2013 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize finalist]]> Found: call, opportunity, residency, awarded, award, entre

Chino Otsuka, <em>Imagine Finding Me</em>, 1975 and 2005, Spain, Japan, 2005, Chromogenic print, 305 mm x 406 mm.</

Chino Otsuka, Imagine Finding Me, 1975 and 2005, Spain, Japan, 2005, Chromogenic print, 305 mm x 406 mm.

Born in Tokyo and educated in the U.K., 2013 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize finalist Chino Otsuka uses photography and video to explore the fluid relationship between memory, photography, and time. She recently completed her residency at the Nikkei National Museum in Burnaby, B.C., which focused on researching Japanese picture brides and their forgotten stories. We caught up with Otsuka to discuss her residency research, work and experience.

AGO: While you were in Vancouver, you worked inside the archives and collection of the Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre. What did your research focus on, and what affect has working in Vancouver had on your work?

Chino Otsuka: The research I conduct is integral to the development of my work. For a while now I have been researching the history of Japanese emigrants. When I found out about the residency component of the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize and was able to choose anywhere in Canada, I knew I wanted to go to the Nikkei National Museum. Since I had previously done similar research on a group of Japanese who went to the Netherlands in the mid-19th century, I wanted to see the museum’s collections and learn more about the history of Japanese-Canadian immigrants.

During the residency I had the opportunity to access and explore museum collections that are not normally seen or easily accessible. I knew very little about the history of Japanese immigrants in Canada, or the hardships and injustice that they suffered. I read and came across so many moving stories. All of this is a very important part of Japanese history, and I’m so surprised that many of these stories are untold outside of Canada.

As my research progressed I became more and more interested in the stories of young women who came over from Japan as a “picture brides,” young Japanese women usually between 17 and 19 years old who came to Canada as in the early 20th century. Their marriages were arranged by showing the prospective bride and groom photographs of each other. Most of these women travelled from Japan and saw their husband-to-be for the first time when they arrived in Canada. I was drawn to their innocence, ambition and courage — their journey. They all longed for a new life in their new country. Yet when they arrived in Canada the life they had imagined was completely different. Hardship and many tragedies would follow them. They struggled and endured so much.

I’ve looked through many photographs and artefacts in the collection and chose to focus especially on their journey to Canada. There is a sense of anticipation around the little moment in their life when they were dreaming about the future. I’ve been working with the old photographs as well as photographing their belongings that they brought with them from Japan.

With your residency now complete, can you speak to the effect that the overall experience has had on your work? Did your work move in a new direction during the residency? If so, how?

The residency has given me a new perspective on my practice, as well as time to explore and experiment with new ideas. The work I started during my residency is not quite finished yet. I’m done with the research and photographing and am now working with these materials through editing and finding ways to present them.

What has the residency allowed you to do in terms of your work and research?

In my work I mainly explore the notion of autobiographical memory, so the residency at the Nikkei National Museum has given me the opportunity to explore and research the history, the collective memory – how the individual memories weave together to tell a story.

In her essay “Chino Otsuka’s Time Machine” Michiko Kasahara writes that your “journeys into the past are not sentimental and do not display a nostalgic atmosphere,” yet much of your work explores issues of duality, history, memory and self. Can you elaborate on/explain your method? Do you agree with the writer’s statement?

I work with the past and many of my works show my past. How I take my works, restage and rework them is really about today, not yesterday.
My works are personal but by carefully selecting the images, and recreating them in the certain ways, I’m trying to engage the viewers’ internal dialogue of their experiences. I hope to make the images/stories resonate and trigger the viewers’ own memories.

Your work, specifically in the series “Imagine Finding Me,” is extremely personal with the subject being your own self and memory. The Aimia | AGO Photography Prize is awarded by public vote. As the subject of the work, what were your thoughts on it being considered in this way?

I visited the AGO during the exhibition while the voting was going on, and when I wandered around the museum strangers came up to tell me that they voted for me. I guess they recognized me from my work, and that was a really strange experience.


*This interview was conducted via email in July 2014 and has been edited for style and brevity.

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29 July 2014, 12:22 pm 3bd46b2e3965663e39e76c1b7bb4c671
<![CDATA[Canadian migrant-rights activist Pablo Muñoz wins WorldPride 2014 National Youth Solidarity art contest]]> Found: jury
WINNER
WINNER
No Walls Between Us, Pablo Munoz, Vancouver (British Colombia)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Round dance on Parliament Hill, Fabric, Acrylic, Sharpie, 2013, Roxanne Martin, Sault Ste. Marie (Ontario)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Sans titre, Matthilde Cing-Mars, Trois-Rivières (Québec)
FINALIST
FINALIST
United, Leo Samilo, Surrey (British Colombia)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Untold truth, Bogdan Salii, Toronto (Ontario)
FINALIST
FINALIST
Complexity, Brianne Walker, Windsor (Ontario)

The Michaëlle Jean Foundation, the AGO and WorldPride Toronto 2014 are delighted to announce the winner of the 4th Wall Youth Solidarity Project online vote.

Selected as winner by more than a thousand Canadians of all ages from across the country, Vancouver-based artist and rights activist Pablo Muñoz receives $1,000 and will work with a seasoned public art practitioner to see his art mounted on the western wall of the AGO.

His work, No Walls Between Us, highlights the unique experiences of migrant and racialized LGBT youth. It was one of six pieces of art chosen by a jury to represent the theme of “Solidarity with Canada’s Two-Spirited and LGBTTIQQ Communities,” in an unprecedented exhibition celebrating WorldPride Toronto 2014.

On view at the AGO between June 22 and Nov. 15, 2014, the Youth Solidarity Exhibition will inspire Canadians to work together to promote safe, inclusive and healthy communities for Two-Spirited and LGBTTIQQ youth throughout the country. The other young artists featured in the exhibition are:

  • Mathilde Cinq-Mars, a multidisciplinary visual and animation artist from Trois-Rivière, Que. who has a BA from the University of Strasbourg;
  • Roxanne Martin, a digital artist from Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., and the great-niece of Cecil Youngfox, a trailblazing Anishinaabe painter and gay rights activist;
  • Bogdan Salii, a passionate visual artist from Toronto, Ont., who recently immigrated to Canada from Ukraine to pursue his dream of transforming his love for art into a lucrative business;
  • Leo Samilo, a nascent artist and recent high school graduate from Surrey, B.C’s Filipino community; and
  • Brianne Walker, a 17-year-old human rights activist from Windsor, Ont., and aspiring visual artist and filmmaker.

This project is actively supported by more than 55 human rights, faith-based, arts, newcomer, Aboriginal and health organizations across Canada. For a full list of project collaborators, click here.

About Pablo Muño
Colombian-born Pablo Muñoz arrived to Canada as a refugee in 2000. Today, he is an accomplished citizen whose artistic work extends from painting, design, performance art and writing, and his community work centers around immigrant and refugee youth issues, intersections of queer and racialized identities, and solidarity with indigenous communities. Over the past year, Pablo worked on the Make it Count campaign — a project that created community dialogues across the province addressing challenges faced by migrant youth. He is currently working as a story editor on a documentary telling the story of queer refugees coming into Canada. He also is a member of the Vancouver Foundation’s Education Granting Committee and the City of Vancouver’s Youth Advisory Committee.

The Youth Solidarity Project is funded in part by StreetARToronto, a program of the City of Toronto, as well as the K.M. Hunter Foundation.

About the 4th Wall program
In theatre, the “fourth wall” is an imaginary screen that creates a virtual separation between actor and spectator. There are many ways to cross the fourth wall and to make the invisible visible. The Michaëlle Jean Foundation chose to do so through the 4th Wall: Make the Invisible Visible program, in collaboration with several prestigious Canadian museums and art galleries. The goal is to invite young creators to break down the invisible walls that create solitudes between individuals and communities across Canada, by opening the doors of our major cultural institutions to emerging creators from marginalized backgrounds. The Foundation offers museum and art gallery space and bursaries to youth from disadvantaged backgrounds, often cut off from museums, so that they can produce original art that conveys their experiences, ideas and challenges. On display for the public to see, their work provokes debate and builds solutions. The first 4th Wall exhibition was launched on Feb. 5, 2014, at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, to mark Black History Month in collaboration with FRO Foundation.

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26 June 2014, 10:51 am ea30053a59b51a2b6d3048cc34f89f16
<![CDATA[Call for applications: An opportunity for Toronto-based MFA photography students]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submit

Are you or do you know a Toronto-based artist who is enrolled in or has recently graduated from an MFA program focusing on photography? If yes, the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize has an opportunity to share.

This August, one of the artists on the yet-to-be-announced shortlist for the 2014 Aimia | AGO Photography Prize will be in Toronto to participate in the Prize’s residency program. Each year, all four artists on the shortlist receive a fully funded, self-directed residency designed to deepen or enrich their respective practices.

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The artist is designing a teaching-focused residency that will be open to five Toronto-based artists who are currently enrolled in or recently graduated from an MFA program with a focus on photography. From Aug. 18 to Aug. 29, the five students will work with the artist, both as a group and one-on-one, with the goal of eliciting critical dialogue about each student’s work and potentially producing new work.

There will be three to four group meetings, and the artist will meet with each of the students individually two to three times over the course of the two-week period. The students will work between the visits to develop ideas and/or create new work. Each student will receive a $500 honorarium to support production and expenses during the study period.

Applicants must be currently enrolled in an MFA program in Canada or internationally or have graduated from such a program after Jan. 1, 2013. Applicants must be based in Toronto between Aug. 18 and 29, 2014, and be available for regular meetings and studio visits during this time.

Although the artist’s identity won’t be publicly revealed until the Aug. 13 shortlist announcement, students under consideration for the program will be notified of the artist’s identity before their participation is confirmed.

Applications must include an artist statement, CV and portfolio of as many as 25 images and/or 10 minutes of video work with detailed credit information (title, date, medium, dimensions). Applications to the program are due July 9.

To submit an application or for more information, please contact Sean O’Neill, Manager, Aimia | AGO Photography Prize at sean_oneill@ago.net.

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23 June 2014, 1:29 pm a491661c35ba6532af13776369b282bc
<![CDATA[Listen: Jim Munroe, Mark Connery and Jonathan Mak talk video games and comics]]> Found: residence

Click to play:

Download 81.4 MB MP3

Recorded: March 26, 2014, at the Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 01:29:05

In this podcast, hear AGO artist-in-residence Jim Munroe in conversation with artists Mark Connery, a Toronto-based comic and zine artist, and Jonathan Mak, a Toronto-based game developer, about their work, indie culture and how playfulness factors into their practices.

Jonathan Mak is a Toronto-based game developer working under the title Queasy Games. He recently collaborated with I am Robot and Proud (aka Shaw-Han Liem), a Toronto-based electronic music artist, on Sound Shapes for PS Vita and PlayStation®3. Sound Shapes features music by Beck, Deadmau5 and Jim Guthrie and graphics by Capy, Superbrothers, Pixeljam and Pyramid Attack.

Mark Connery is a Toronto-based producer of comics and zines. He is most known for the mini-comic adventures of Rudy. In addition to his own publications, his work has appeared in many group exhibitions and has been published in Exclaim!, Kiss Machine and in many small-press lit zines in Toronto and Vancouver.

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4 June 2014, 9:00 am 7ecbcd287d321df62d87955f8cbb5ea9
<![CDATA[In memoriam: A tribute to the memory of Lynne Cohen]]> Found: call, residency

The Art Gallery of Ontario shares in the loss of Lynne Cohen, one of Canada’s finest visual artists. Lynne’s remarkable body of work took us to extraordinary, often-foreboding places — places we would be unlikely to encounter in our daily lives, except through her compelling photographs. Her enigmatic, real-world photographs of interior environments, uninhabited by humans, alluded to her sense of wit and irony.

Lynne Cohen, Untitled (Column), 2009. © Lynne Cohen, 2010.

Lynne Cohen, Untitled (Column), 2009. © Lynne Cohen, 2010.

An internationally collected artist, Lynne was nominated for the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize (then called the Grange Prize) in 2009, and the AGO is proud to have exhibited her work alongside the nominees from Canada and Mexico. Lynne spent her Prize-sponsored residency in Mexico, inspired by interior spaces that became new installations of extraordinary photographs.

Lynne’s legacy will be remembered by all who admired her vision, dedication to students, loyalty to those who knew her and her incredible strength the past three years. Our deepest condolences to Andrews Lugg, her partner of 50 years, who was closest to Lynne in every way.

— Maia Sutnik, Curator, Special Photography Projects at the AGO

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15 May 2014, 1:48 pm e22ff6e59039f8515b186e701816c618
<![CDATA[ART: Where to buy artist-made Christmas gifts in Brighton]]> Found: opportunity

Still struggling with the seasonal shopping? It doesn't all have to be trawling through Amazon or fighting the crowds at Churchill Square. Christmas is the perfect opportunity to support the arts and buy something truly special. Here are three of the best places in Brighton to buy creative Christmas gifts.

The post ART: Where to buy artist-made Christmas gifts in Brighton appeared first on Brighton Culture.

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10 December 2011, 10:32 am 3ace158fdd854ffc3bea34b33a717291
<![CDATA[New in the Galleries: 2014 Photography Competition Winners]]> Found: submissions, submission
Enjoy these winning images from the 2014 Photography Competition, organized by the Women’s Committee of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Selected by noted photographer Larry Fink, gallery director and publisher Darius Himes, and the Brodsky Curator of Photographs Peter Barberie, these compelling works are now part of the Museum’s permanent collection. The competition, which received more than 780 submissions from established and emerging artists from all over the world, was designed to foster the discovery of new talent internationally.

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