ArsRSS Calls and Opportunities http://net18reaching.org/artrss/ Current Term Specific News Feed en-us Sun, 23 Nov 2014 14:00:05 -0600 240 <![CDATA[Nude Attitude 2015 - Peoria, Illinois]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: January 16, 2015

]]>
c52dd0cac01784529016a347e2c1ea25
<![CDATA[America's ClayFest III - Roseville, California]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3000+ in awards. Deadline: February 27, 2015

]]>
06f00cffb5dc97e6e174577a01713289
<![CDATA[Shirt Factory Gallery Small Works 2015 - Glens Falls, New York]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: February 1, 2015

]]>
23dcabf1a08b50610136b92c7e95f909
<![CDATA[The Earth Speaks, A Juried Exhibition on the Climate Crisis - Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1100 in awards. Deadline: January 16, 2015

]]>
7b29dc505577cdf2a0143143d3e8e2ac
<![CDATA[St. Clair Art Fair - Saint Clair, Michigan]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,500 in cash awards. Deadline: February 14, 2015

]]>
9e4b9fc55c31bae8e088b59392698983
<![CDATA[NYC4PA Portraits International Photography Exhibit - New York, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in cash awards. Deadline: December 14, 2014

]]>
d0ac23124630bbbd57155d0e98b80457
<![CDATA[Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival - Reston, Virginia]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: December 7, 2014

]]>
169327b463a66b72f148d1c95bc31de0
<![CDATA[Marion Arts Festival - Marion, Iowa]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: January 21, 2015

]]>
835d3c2cc19c617badec262b3e4035a4
<![CDATA[Southworks National Juried Exhibition - Watkinsville, Georgia]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,700 in awards. Deadline: February 13, 2015

]]>
daa26c1e2d5f0d023d6efdb286128418
<![CDATA[You Art What You Eat | National Juried Exhibit - Chicago Heights, Illinois]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: January 16, 2015

]]>
5cf233abd50bfe2a1e3be742ed7a86a1
<![CDATA[The Nor]]> Found: call

Nor-700

For the Hayward Gallery’s MIRRORCITY exhibition, I am undertaking a series of walks around London, an investigation into paranoia, electromagnetism, and infrastructure, which I call The Nor.

The walks are documented with essays, photographs and other material published online. This page will be periodically updated as they become available.

November 7th: All Cameras Are Police Cameras

The first walk partially tracks the London Congestion Charge Zone. I photographed surveillance cameras and was threatened with arrest. I’d been reading Jonathan Crary’s 24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep and Eyal Weizman’s Before and after: Documenting the architecture of disaster, and listening to a lot of Black Metal.

More coming soon…

]]>
7 November 2014, 7:47 am fee4691e0ccf3c79e62d43850fa13fbb
<![CDATA[Rainbow Plane 002: Kiev]]> Found: opportunity

For the Future Generation Art Prize in Kiev, Ukraine, I installed a new version of the Rainbow Plane: a 1:1 outline of an aircraft, as seen by a satellite.

The “rainbow plane” effect, which I first came across some years ago, and spoke about in 2011, is caused by the pan-sharpening technique of satellite imagery. Rather than taking a photograph, satellite sensors record electromagnetic radiation in the red, blue, green, and high-resolution panchromatic (black-and-white) bands (as well as several not visible to the human eye, as this Mapbox post helpfully explains). When these bands are combined to produce a visible image, fast-moving objects – like planes in flight – don’t quite match up, producing the rainbow effect.

Rainbow Plane (Google Maps)

The previous Rainbow Plane was an experimental supersonic jet which never flew; this one is very real. It’s a Gulfstream V, one of a class of numerous private jets produced by the General Dynamics-owned aerospace company. (General Dynamics also built the F-16 Fighting Falcon, and founded General Atomics, which produces Predator and Reaper drones).

The Gulfstream V is one of the most popular business jets on the market, used by private individuals including Russian oligarchs and Google founders, corporations, and governments. Military variants include Israel’s fleet of G550 SEMA surveillance planes. One Gulfstream V also became notorious as the “Guantanamo Bay Express”, one of the most frequently used planes in the CIA rendition programme.

Gulfstream

For me, the Rainbow Plane stands for the moment when we see how technology sees the world, and thus how technology both obscures and reproduces political intent. Just as private aviation is used by power to exceed and evade national and legal jurisdictions, and satellite networks are deployed to measure and surveil the globe, analogous technologies can be used to invert and render visible these relationships.

Like the appearance of secret flights on civilian radar websites, the rainbow plane is a window into the workings of private networks of transit, rendition, surveillance and governance. The rainbow plane is a true “glitch”, where we see not an error, but a glimpse of how systems really function, allowing us to better understand and act within them. An aesthetic which reveals not the surface, but the depth of things.

Rainbow Plane 002 - 1

Rainbow Plane 002 - 2

Rainbow Plane 002 - 3

Rainbow Plane 002 - 4

The Rainbow Plane is installed in the City Arena centre adjacent to the PinchukArtCentre in Kiev until 4 January 2015. More photographs of the installation are available at Flickr.

I’m very grateful to the PinchukArtCentre staff and everyone at the Future Generation Art Prize for the assistance and opportunity to realise this work.

]]>
29 October 2014, 9:21 am bc33dd935f26271a2204fbb891dc6cfe
<![CDATA[Received by Post: Printed Web, TBD, and the Moving Museum]]> Found: call, submit

Three items have recently arrived by post, three publications, collaborations, and projects:

Printed-Web

The Library of the Printed Web is a project by Paul Soulellis, “a collection of works by artists who use screen capture, image grab, site scrape and search query to create printed matter from content found on the web”. The first issue launched at Printed Matter’s LA Art Book Fair in January 2014, while this, the second edition, launched at Printed Matter’s NY Art Book Fair at MoMA PS1 in September, featuring work by Constant Dullaart, Daniel Temkin, John Zissovici, Cheryl Sourkes, Brian Droitcour, Tan Lin, Angela Genusa, Webdriver Torso, Rafaël Rozendaal, Olia Lialina, Cory Arcangel – and me.

For the book, I submitted three spreads of Landsat images, based on my Laaaaaaandsat tumblr, a continuously updated record of imagery released into the public domain by the Landsat program, the longest running enterprise for acquisition of satellite imagery of Earth. One thing I love about Landsat, out of many, is its continual partial rotation of the photographic frame, caused by the alignment of every image to north – a north which has no real meaning once you’re out in space – which results in a tipsy quavering of the images on the page and screen. It is also, in part, an homage to the archive view, and the endless scroll which so perfectly reproduces the experience of the web itself.

TBD

Back in October of 2012, I participated in a three-day workshop in Detroit organised by the Near Future Laboratory, called To Be Designed. The ultimate aim of this gathering was to produce a catalogue of design fictions: provocations from the near future. As Julian Bleecker, who did all of the heavy lifting, described it: “The products in the catalog serve as stand-ins and props that are representative of the everyday drama implicit in their existence”. The final result arrived last week, and is very lovely indeed: the TBD Catalog.

You can purchase a copy from the Near Future Laboratory, and read more about the project on their blog.

Moving-Museum-LP

As part of the Moving Museum show in London at the end of last year – for which I made the Occupy the Cloud public banner installation – the Vinyl Factory commissioned sound works and cover images from nine of the participating artists and created a handsome limited edition box set of LPs.

BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK (Alice and Bob worked for the NSA all along), my contribution to the set, is a recording of my PGP Key – specifically my Public Key, which is what I send to people so that I can share encrypted emails with them. The format is based on that of number stations, those cryptic Cold War shortwave broadcasts commonly attributed to espionage. In particular, it uses the call sign of the Lincolnshire Poacher. Watch and listen below, or on Vimeo.

]]>
14 October 2014, 7:59 am c9e871d4bf20f965d45706b41b47aa0a
<![CDATA[AQD: Remembrancer]]> Found: calls, call

The Remembrancer

A Quiet Disposition, my weak AI for gathering information about drones, is now open to the public online, and anyone can review it. AQD scours the public internet for information about UAVs of all forms, and analyses it, extracting names, companies, locations, and anything else it can make sense of. Running since January 2013, the database contains 25,644 people, 33252 documents, and 76414 terms – all linked by semantic analysis, bearing the signature of the drone.

I’ve previously shown AQD as a set of books, and a related visualisation, combing through the database to find pairs of names, linked by incriminating terms. The development of AQD has been assisted by the Open Data Institute’s Data as Culture programme, and for the Victoria & Albert Museum’s Digital Design Weekend, AQD has taken the form of a free newspaper, called The Remembrancer. 3000 of them are stacked up in the sculpture galleries, to be distributed over the course of the weekend. The editorial written for the back page of this publication can be found below.

The Remembrancer

In a series of articles in the Washington Post in October 2012, reporter Greg Miller revealed the existence of the Obama administration’s strategic database for pursuing terrorists, a “next-generation targeting list” called the “disposition matrix.” This database contains the names of suspected terrorists, together with “an accounting of the resources being marshalled to track them down, including sealed indictments and clandestine operations.”

The purpose of the disposition matrix is to determine the targets for the US covert drone programme, an ongoing programme of assassinations in Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and possibly elsewhere. Previous to the announcement of the disposition matrix, the administration had repeatedly denied the existence of the so-called “kill lists”, but the killing continued. Between June 2004 and the end of 2013, these attacks killed an estimated 3105 people in Pakistan alone, including 535 known civilians and 175 children. (Sources: The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, New America Foundation.)

Drones—unmanned aerial vehicles—are a secretive technology, by nature and by design. Intended to operate in distant and hostile environments, they remain largely invisible both to their intended targets, and to the democracies which consent to their use. They also freight this secrecy to other areas of operation. Named spokespeople do not discuss the drones, they are the domain of the “unnamed official”. Even the London Metropolitan Police, in response to a series of Freedom of Information requests, have asserted the exception of the drone, and refused to discuss its use in civilian contexts. This secrecy extends to the information gathered on its behalf, the reams of data, and the means by which it is analysed and processed. In 2010, the New York Times reported that this deluge of data gathered by drones was overwhelming military analysts, who were looking to ‘big data’ solutions from the television and news industries to understand what they were seeing. The disposition matrix, too, is likely to consist of such automated, algorithmic systems to analyse and interpret the data fed into it. How much of its analysis is performed by humans, and how much by machines, we are unlikely to be told.

Occasionally, we are given glimpses into the ways the disposition matrix makes decisions, how it decides who will be killed. In February 2014, the Intercept revealed that the Joint Special Operations Command, which controls drone strikes in Yemen, Somalia, Afghanistan and elsewhere, often based its attacks on automated analysis of cell phone data: a cell phone signal detected at a known meeting of suspicious individuals and later detected travelling down a desert road in a remote part of the country could be enough to incriminate the person carrying it. A former JSOC High Value Targeting Team member stated that: “People get hung up that there’s a targeted list of people. It’s really like we’re targeting a cell phone. We’re not going after people – we’re going after their phones, in the hopes that the person on the other end of that missile is the bad guy.” These attacks are called “signature strikes”, undertaken on the basis not of a name, but on the signature, the appearance, of information itself.

This information is known as “metadata”. It consists not of the data itself—what people talk about, what they are planning—but the associations between them, networks of relationships which purport to reveal something about their intentions. NSA General Counsel Stewart Baker has stated that “metadata absolutely tells you everything about somebody’s life. If you have enough metadata, you don’t really need content.” During a debate at John Hopkins University in April 2014, Michael Hayden, a former Director of both the NSA and the CIA, confirmed that position, and went further: “We kill people based on metadata.”

A Quiet Disposition is an automated intelligence-gathering system which lives on the civilian network—the internet. It scours the web for information about drones, collected from news stories, blog posts and company reports. Using an open-source semantic analysis programme called Calais, developed by Thomson Reuters, it analyses the content of these texts to harvest their metadata: the names of people and places, of companies and organisations. From this information it builds a map of associations, its own network of inference and intention. Through their association, however distant, with the drone programme, these people and companies are implicated in the wider uses and abuses of the technology. A Quiet Disposition is a weak artificial intelligence: collecting information, drawing connections, building a picture. Since its inception in January 2013, the database has expanded to include some 25,000 people, 32,000 documents, and almost 75,000 “terms”—locations, technologies, titles and industries.

The City Remembrancer is an officer of the City of London, the financial and semi-independent centre of the nation’s capital, whose role is to communicate the desires of the City to parliament. Writing in the Guardian, George Monbiot described the Remembrancer thusly: “The City of London is the only part of Britain over which parliament has no authority. In one respect at least the Corporation acts as the superior body: it imposes on the House of Commons a figure called the remembrancer: an official lobbyist who sits behind the Speaker’s chair and ensures that, whatever our elected representatives might think, the City’s rights and privileges are protected.”

The City of London is also home to the FTSE 350 index, a list the largest 350 companies by capitalisation which have their primary listing on the London Stock Exchange. Of these 350 companies, 46 are known to A Quiet Disposition, identified in its long trawl through the deep web. Some of these companies are directly associated with the drone programme, such as BAE Systems and Qinetiq which design and build automated systems, to less obvious suspects, such as British Telecom, which constructed the dedicated fibre-optic link from RAF Croughton in Northamptonshire to Camp Lemonnier in Djibouti used by the US Air Force to operate drone strikes. Other companies may seem even more distant, but in their dealings the system has, somehow, detected the signature of the drone. They are implicated by association.

The Remembrancer, this newspaper, is one form of the information held in the database—but it’s barely readable. Or at least, its readable, but its near incomprehensible. The stories it tells are generated from the information it has gathered, in the same way that spam emails are generated: text from real sources, garbled by the machine as it attempts to make sense of them, and tell them back to us. Terms which are significant to the system are highlighted, weighted with meaning, but the meaning assigned to them by an algorithm, a non-human near-intelligence. The information it has gathered is too vast to be comprehended in its totality by us, but we must try to make sense of it. Lives depend upon it.

“Big Data”, the slippery term for the overwhelming flood of information unleashed by our increasingly surveilled and analysed world, is both promise and menace. It plays into our universal desire to know more about the world, and thus to operate in it more efficiently, but downplays the extent to which the world is shaped by the data that we choose to gather, the technology that gathers it, and the politics of those who design that technology. Increasingly, we inhabit a world where decisions are made by unknowable machines; not a dystopian future, but a banal recreation of the present, constructed from the traces of phone calls, credit card transactions, voting records. In this world, we must take responsibility not only for our own actions, but the actions of the vast non-human assemblages we have built around us—from corporations to complex software systems—and acknowledge the moral and physical limits of our technologies, and ourselves.

The Remembrancer

View the whole newspaper at Flickr.

]]>
20 September 2014, 4:01 am aeb3736aeb0da04af8ab523b54c609e5
<![CDATA[Spectacular Sports Visualisations]]> Found: calls, call, award

The 2014 World Cup in Brazil marks the first time that goal-line technology has been used for FIFA’s international tournament and with that in mind National Football Museum commissioned me to give an overview of where these systems are coming from, and where they might be going. This essay was originally published at The Commentary Project.

When Google unveiled its long-awaited wearable computer, Glass, in June of 2012, it did so through what might be called a lifestyle montage, a series of extreme sports events performed by “some of the world’s top athletes”. The Glass-wearers first skydived out of an aeroplane, then took to mountain bikes to manoeuvre through the conference centre onto the event stage. Throughout, what was streamed to viewers in the auditorium and watching online was not footage of the athletes undertaking the events, but what the athletes themselves were seeing, their point of view. What is spectacular about Glass, despite its real power as a connected, networked object, and what almost all discussion of it concentrates on, is its camera, the ability to see from another’s viewpoint, and everything this reveals.

While miniature high-definition cameras such as the GoPro Hero – particularly popular with the extreme sports community, bracketed to helmets, handlebars and snowboards – have made POV shots possible for a while, there’s something about Glass’ head-mounted position which appeals, as if it were not a camera, but the eye itself. Basketball teams have been early adopters of Glass. The Sacramento Kings, Indiana Pacers and Orlando Magic have all used Glass to enhance the “fan experience” by sharing headsets between announcers, resting players, support staff and coaches, and relaying the feed to giant screens above the action – but the NBA has yet to permit the use of Glass on court during play itself.

Another function of these cameras, aside from both the focus on, and the freedom from, a human-centred viewpoint, is that they transform our idea not only of vision, but also of memory. Many wearable cameras are marketed as such, like ‘Memoto’ (now rebranded as ‘Narrative’) and ‘Autographer’, small wearable digital cameras clipped to the chest or hung round the neck which photograph the owner’s viewpoint almost continually, building a continuous stream of images and data called a ‘lifelog’. The promise of such devices is total recall (“we can remember it for you wholesale”) – a promise, of course, which is always illusory.

A more rugged version of Glass, Broadcast Sports Inc’s head-mounted Ref Cam, has been deployed by Major League Soccer in the US. While it looks like a massive pain to wear, its wide-angle lens, bobbing with the referee’s pace, seems to open up a correspondingly wide field of view from the centre of the field, which feels liberating after the surveillance-like gaze of stand-mounted cameras. This is in stark contrast to Sky Sports’ version in the UK, whose chest-mounted ref cam was derided by former England hooker Brian Moore, writing in the Telegraph that “apart from nausea nothing was added to the viewing experience and the only previously unseen footage was that of the sky or the top of the scrum.” Moore’s real point, however, was that there was a fundamental flaw in the idea that such cameras could capture more of the “truth” of the game unfolding in front of them: “What is seen on camera is not a true rendering of what is actually perceived in a stressful moment.” Moore even cited a 2010 science paper on the use of wearable cameras by the Hillsboro, Oregon, Police Department, which found that even when every moment of a police investigation was recorded digitally, this evidence still had the potential to mislead officers, the judiciary and juries because of “the lack of understanding of important factors like the field of view, focus of attention and interpretation” – which sounds, too, like the advice of a particularly astute sports coach.

Indeed, much debate which happens in sports commentary around technologies of vision and adjudication would not sound out of place in academic journals of both the sciences and the humanities. Sporting fields have become the testing grounds for these technologies, providing as they do enclosed, hermetic fields of view, and strictly managed rules of movement and engagement – the kind of laboratory only dreamt of by scientists developing surveillance and monitoring platforms for military and urban situations, their most common applications.

When the English and Australian cricket teams faced each other in the Ashes series of the Summer of 2013, much of the commentary-box discussion focussed on the use of the new Umpire Decision Review System (DRS), a suite of technologies which assist – or rather, overrule – the umpire adjudicating some of sports greatest unknowables, the LBW, and the snick. Of course, these technologies, intended to increase accuracy, only inflamed controversy as their own accuracy was questioned as much as the human umpires. LBW is, after all, an epistemological problem – the question of whether a ball which strikes the batsman would have struck the wicket were the batsman not there is a question for Plato, not for machines. Nevertheless, cameras and sensors descended from military targetting systems are trained on the wicket in order to determine the best possible answer, and the algorithms which make up this situation determine the outcome of games – much to the frustration of many players and spectators. As Test Match Special commentator Jonathan Agnew, echoing Moore, noted: “The problem with the introduction of technology is the expectation of 100% accuracy” – a simple observation, but one which cuts to the heart of applying such supposedly rigorous approaches to sport, a fundamentally human endeavour which thrives on close calls, points of view, and, ultimately, chance.

Digital cameras are always more than cameras: they do not just make images, they ‘see’ and process them. Every connected digital-imaging system is also a computer, observing and making decisions about what it sees. This distinction is particularly well illustrated by “freeD” technology, which stands for Free Dimensional Video, a proprietary imaging system which debuted at Yankee Stadium in the 2013 Baseball season. Video feeds from multiple 12-megapixel cameras around the ground are combined within a dedicated server to produce a three-dimensional “scene”, through which the director can manoeuvre a virtual camera to produce unlimited, even “impossible” points of view. The entirety of the game world is simultaneously captured and re-viewed as a simulation. As with Eadweard Muybridge’s development of high-speed photography, which first allowed us to perceive a galloping racehorse with all four feet off the ground, the augmentation of the eye with technological systems allows us to see sport in new ways.

This total release of the visible “point of view” from any “human” viewpoint corresponds to the perceived freeing of decision-making from human error. This summer, the Football World Cup will for the first time utilise goal-line technology to determine whether the ball has crossed the line. Several different systems competed for selection, including the version of Hawk Eye used in Premier League, but the one which was chosen is a German surveillance system called GoalControl 4D. A total of fourteen cameras mounted on the stadium roof capture the three-dimensional position of the ball to within a few millimetres, enabling not only accurate decisions about goal-line crossings to be immediately relayed to referees via wrist-mounted “smart watches”, but also stored, replayed, and endlessly reanalysed. As in Cricket, the deployment of such decision systems has been much debated and often opposed, most volubly by FIFA president Sepp Blatter who has stated that “Other sports regularly change the laws of the game to react to the new technology. … We don’t do it and this makes the fascination and the popularity of football”. In this too we hear the deeply felt but ultimately fruitless appeal to the idea of sport as a fundamentally human endeavour, not at risk from, but essentially composed of, human frailty and fallibility.

Fruitless, of course, because we apparently find ourselves incapable of resisting the technological promise of an ever greater, ever more incremental, approach to some impossible “truth”, a Zeno’s arrow fired by a linesman towards the centre of the field. In sport, this truth-of-outcome is inextricably linked to the truth-of-performance, wherein one competitor, one side, ‘deserves’ to win because they are better prepared, better trained, better deployed, better equipped with what, in military circles, is referred to as “battlefield awareness”, leading to “full spectrum dominance of the battlespace”. As such, the same technologies of surveillance and appraisal are applied not just to decision-making during play, but also to data-gathering for post-game analysis by commentators and coaches alike.

From the beginning of the 2011-12 season, the NBA started installing STATS LLC SportVU cameras in basketball arenas, a technology expected to be mandated by the end of 2014 (again, like the application of surveillance systems in civilian environments, what begin as experiments in technology are ultimately and almost always codified in law). The SportVU system consists, like GoalControl, of a network of cameras around the arena connected to a data-processing system which tracks not only the ball in play, but individually identifiable players as well. The system’s sophisticated algorithms are capable of determining not only positioning, but through situational analysis, the events produced by and at these locations, such as dribbles, passes, touches and shots. The data is used to produce official NBA stats for every game, but also – for teams which pay a subscription of around $100,000 per year – to analyse and determine optimal strategy for the players themselves.

In March 2013, the Grantland blog revealed that the Toronto Raptors were using the data to – among many other things – “build computerized “ghost defenders” that reacted in optimal ways to every offensive action. The team could then overlay camera recordings of actual game play to see how closely Toronto’s real players mirrored the actions of their ghosts.” Once again, the real-world action on the court is filtered and replayed through simulations in order to re-direct the action back in meatspace. This is what is really driving the adoption of seeing systems in sport: truth-of-outcome not only produced by truth-of-performance, but, through technological feedback, fine tuning that performance as well.

To see where such systems might go in the future, we need only look to their current limitations – and the parallels of and responses to those limitations in other, surveillance-saturated spheres. Cairos Systems was another German-based bidder for the World Cup goal-line job, using a system called GLT which embedded magnetic sensors into the frame of the goal, and into the ball itself (of course, Cairos also has a system, called VIS.TRACK, which tracks player performance data through a network of cameras). On their website, Cairos writes – unusually explicitly for a technology company, that “In football, there are many decisions and scenes that may be discussed controversially. In the end the truth often lies in the eye of the beholder. Penalty or not? Red card or a dive? Active or passive offside?” It goes on to state that whether or not the goal line is crossed is one decision which “is clearly defined by the rules and does not leave space for interpretation. The question whether or not a goal has been scored can be decided without any doubts due to the rules.” As such, this particular decision is particularly amenable to technological intervention.

The counter-examples given here – penalties, red cards, offside – are instructive, because they fit far better what Brian Moore called the “focus of attention and interpretation”, the contentious, context-is-everything moments of sporting contact. Once again, we are in the domain not of observation, but of inference. The claim is now being made, however, that many automated, intelligent surveillance systems cannot only determine what happened, they can infer intent; they not only look back, but forward.

A study by the universities of Bradford and Aberystwyth in conjunction with the UK Border Agency in 2011 used video cameras and high-definition thermal imagery – essentially the same technology used to detect the “hot spot” in cricket – alongside yet more algorithms to determine whether study participants were lying. Telling signals such as eye movement, dilated pupils and nose wrinkling are visible to the human/video eye, but thermal imagery also reveals subconscious swelling of the blood vessels around the eye, a sign of distress or fear which signals that untruths may be in play. The UKBA stressed, as they prepared to install such systems at UK airports in the summer of 2012, that the technology is only useful when paired with an experienced human judge – and by that logic, why should it not be deployed alongside positioning cameras in the stands of the World Cup, to assist referees in determining which of two participants in a contested foul is telling the truth?

Why, after all, should we wait for fouls and other offences, such as offside, to be committed? It should be just as easy to award penalties and free kicks on the basis of players’ intent, and would be much safer and fairer for all involved. Recently, the US Department of Homeland Security’s “Project Hostile Intent”, for example, secured funding for a host of technologies claiming to predict crime based on “suspicious” behaviour. One of them, another camera-server assemblage produced by BRS Labs, uses “a range of in-built parameters of what is ‘normal’, [and] can track up to 150 people at a time to build up a “memory” of suspicious behaviour to begin determining what is inappropriate.” They are currently being installed in more than 300 locations in San Francisco, with strong expressions of interest from other global cities – although, as yet, none from FIFA. But if such systems can be trusted to protect our lives and livelihoods from the threat of terrorist attack, then surely they can be trusted to prevent another Hand of God?

Blatter, Moore, and Agnew, are all, surprisingly or not, for better or worse, at the forefront of a debate which extends far beyond the playing field. When we see sport through the eyes of the machines, we fundamentally change the nature of sport – and reveal, too, the extent to which the rest of society is reformed by our drive to visualise and reframe it with these technologies. As in so many ways, sport itself becomes the lens through which we understand ourselves.

]]>
29 June 2014, 4:36 am f03acc6964c1ddc19e1bffbf2547e41c
<![CDATA[#Rorschcam NYC]]> Found: call, residency

I just arrived in New York for a three-month residency at Eyebeam. I had a rough first week, but on Monday fellow resident Ingrid Burrington showed me the Department of Transport’s online traffic cameras for New York City. I’d wanted to do a new rorsch-thing for a while (see, previously, Rorschmap and Rorschmap: Street View Edition) – and, as the streetview version was a little love letter to London, I thought I could redeem myself with this city by making it something nice: so I did.

rorschcam1

#Rorschcam NYC takes hundreds of live New York traffic cameras, from all five boroughs, and makes what I call rorsches out of them; simple, reflected auto-images – or the network dreaming the city.

They look pretty great at night too (see this Flickr set for more screen captures – but they’re better live):

rorschcam2

Like the city itself, it’s a little grimmer, a little darker than London. And then you start to see the stories. Have fun exploring.

]]>
11 March 2014, 10:35 am 9d893baf571b3918983210bdf10ccc4a
<![CDATA[Planespotting]]> Found: call

Today is International Migrants Day. Last week, I wrote about the failed deportation of Isa Muaza. Yesterday, Unity Centre Glasgow announced that another appeal by Muaza’s legal team had failed, and he was rescheduled for deportation, alongside a large number of others, on Tuesday night.

Blog_01

I heard at about 7pm that several detainees had been loaded onto vans at Harmondsworth Detention Centre and were on the move. I didn’t know where they were headed, but I knew that many previous flights had left from the private aviation area at Stansted Airport, a largely un-signposted collection of car parks and hangars on the western side of the airport. I arrived there at 8, just in time to see the first of several coaches and security vans, together with a police escort, arrive at the Inflite Jet Centre, a private customs and handling facility mostly used by private jets.

The coaches, five in all and probably from several different detention centres, arrived between 8 and 9, and were accompanied by silver vans bearing the logo of security company Tascor, formerly Reliance, who took over the role of deportation escorts from G4S in 2011 following the death of Jimmy Mubenga. Tascor has a page on its website called Our Values, where it boasts: “We steer clear of politics”. Most of the coaches were from WH Tours in Crawley, although one bore the bright yellow sun and jaunty typography of Just Go!

Blog_05

It is profoundly uncomfortable watching anonymous people of colour being loaded on and off vans and planes in the middle of the night under tight security. When you know a little of the background of the detainees, when you read their claims of torture and violence, their long battles to secure asylum, the institutional racism and homophobia, it’s terrible. But even without knowing these things, the manner in which it is done should tell you everything you need to know. The British Human Rights lawyer Gareth Peirce writes in Dispatches from the Dark Side, on UK complicity in torture, that “what is in fact the law precisely mirrors instinctive moral revulsion” but that “in this country, the government hardly needs such acceptance, since here the additional and crucial factor is that the public is unlikely to be given sufficient information to trigger revulsion.” Hence the night, the private terminals, charter flights, the hired coaches. All of this is deliberate: it is a policy of not being seen.

The detainees were kept on the coaches for some time, and there appeared to be some confusion about when they were going to depart. It’s standard practice in this situation to bring extra “reserve” deportees to the airport without warning, a practice condemned as inhumane by some MPs and the Inspector of Prisons. Before deportation, each detainee is issued with a plane ticket which gives the flight time – 22:20hrs in this case – and a flight number. As the flights are chartered, the flight number – here PVT091 – is internal, so it’s impossible to find out more details about it, except by going to the airport. The Home Office has been running deportation charter flights for some time, under as much secrecy as they can get away with, and refuses to disclose the companies involved in case it damages their commercial relationships. The ongoing deportation of Nigerians on charter flights is called “Operation Majestic”, but there are regular flights to many other countries, including “popular destinations” such as Pakistan and Afghanistan. Corporate Watch published a comprehensive report on what they call collective expulsion last month.

Blog_02

On the tarmac by the jet centre sat a Titan Airways 767. Titan Airways is based at Stansted, and describes itself as “the UK’s most prestigious charter airline.” Its fleet ranges from small business aircraft to widebodied airliners:

Since it’s foundation in 1988, Titan Airways has grown into the UK’s most prestigious charter airline, specialising in bespoke air charter, tour operator programmes and high end / corporate air travel as well as airline sub charter and aircraft leasing. It brings the very best standards of care and comfort to all its passengers. Once safely aboard, they can relax and enjoy our superb in-flight service and a wide choice of cuisine and fine wines to complete the experience. Titan’s modern, reliable aircraft can operate from all major international and regional airports day and night, 365 days a year.

It’s cold, and wet, and dark, and some of the deportees have been sitting on board coaches for hours, while Tascor guards mill about, smoke and chat. As it approached midnight, there was more activity around the plane, and it appeared that all the deportees were on board as the coaches left the terminal compound empty and parked up outside. (The next day, Unity tells me that two people were taken off the flight at the last minute, but those people estimated that around 80 Nigerians and Ghanaians were on board, including Isa Muaza, who was taken straight to hospital on arrival in Lagos, and a woman who married a British citizen two years ago, and was not expected to be deported).

Blog_04

You can watch flights taking off from the far side of the airport, from a muddy lane alongside the north end of the runway. On the way over to it, I was stopped by the Police, who had been told I had been seen around the private aviation area. They were happy that I was a ‘spotter’ looking for planes – and advised me to join Essex Police’s Plane Watch scheme – but also warned me that the private aviation section was a restricted area, and I shouldn’t go there.

At 00:27, the Titan Airways 767 roared down the Stansted runway and into the night. Moments before, its call-sign appeared on Flightradar: AWC48A. And from there, an aircraft registration number: G-POWD.

We can see G-POWD on approach to Lagos a little after 6am. Two hours later, it’s on the move again, making the hop westwards from Lagos to Accra, the capital of Ghana, where it makes another stop. And then at 11am it appears to lift off back in the direction of London – at time of writing, it is probably somewhere over North Africa.

Flight_000

Flight_001

Flight_002

Flight_03

When I got back to my car around 1, I had a flat battery, and had to wait for a repair man. When he arrived, and I explained what I was doing in this godforsaken place, he told me he’d been at the Inflite Terminal recently too, to jump-start a brand-new Tascor transporter van, whose driver told him these flights happen all the time, and nobody knows about it, not even most of the people who work at the airport. “Makes you think,” he said. “Makes you think.”

*

Photos are available at Flickr

]]>
18 December 2013, 11:19 am e89e215eac93545ed6af598bc198fd46
<![CDATA[The Truth podcast: Eat Cake]]> Found: calls, call
Can coconut cake + random phone calls = love? Find out in our alternative Valentine's Day radio drama from US producer Jonathan Mitchell
Francesca Panetta

]]>
14 February 2011, 9:22 am 196e56db861cfa8df85f0beefe71e779
<![CDATA[The Heckle 02: Mistaken identities]]> Found: awards, award
In the Guardian's daily podcast from Edinburgh, Lucy Porter and Brian Logan mull over mistaken identities with Phill Jupitus and Andre Vincent and comedy bigwigs report on this year's if.comedy awards, plus Phil Nichol.

]]>
7 August 2007, 5:35 am c98463d1678f7b9315b468b8d649985e
<![CDATA[The same condition repeated at every moment of the walk]]> Found: residency, residence

Norwegian-Sámi artist and architect Joar Nango presents a new body of work that responds to Vancouver’s changing urban landscape. Informed by his ongoing research into the creative DIY building techniques found in Sámi architecture, Nango’s practice highlights the role of local knowledge in creating livable communities: championing indigenous approaches to design and alternative models for social space.

Joar Nango (b. 1979, Alta, Norway) lives and works in Romssa, Norway. Inhabiting the frontier between architecture, design and art, Nango’s practice explores issues of native identity through contradictions in contemporary architecture and the built environment. In particular, he is interested in the creative simplicity and sustainable knowledge that exists within informal building environments of the north. In 2010 Nango co-founded the architectural collective FFB specializing in temporary structures and interventions in urban contexts. FFB was nominated for Norsk Form’s prize for young architects in 2012. Joar Nango has exhibited internationally, including recently as part of 43SNA, Medellin, Colombia (2013), the Norwegian Sculpture Biennale at Vigelandsmuseet, Oslo, Norway (2013), and Archizines at the Storefront for Art and Architecture, NYC, USA (2012). Recent solo exhibitions by Nango have been presented at Gallery SAW, Ottawa, Canada (2013), Knipsu, Bergen, Norway (2012), and SDG in Karasjok, Norway (2011). Currently he is artist-in-residence at the Office for Contemporary Art Norway’s residency program in Beijing, China.

 

Produced with the generous support of the Office for Contemporary Art Norway.

 

]]>
27 October 2014, 12:55 pm 495bd015fed9f7d579e588a928d0c9a6
<![CDATA[Neo Nativism versus New Music]]> Found: call, residence, awarded, awards, award

Door $20 / $12

 

In 1989, a group of young Aboriginal artists took the floor at the Western Front for an influential multi-media performance entitled Neo Nativism, an expression of traditional Aboriginal culture through new technology. Fall 2014 marks its 25th anniversary and to celebrate Russell Wallace, one of Neo Nativism’s founding members, curates a night of New Music revisiting it’s original aim to connect tradition with modernity. The evening features contemporary Aboriginal performances by Leonard Fisher, new music co-composed by Russell Wallace and Remy Siu; Pat Ernst and Lan Tung; Michael Park and Warren Arcand, and arrangements of traditional and contemporary Aboriginal music by Tony Wilson for the Salt Chuck City Ensemble, a large ensemble of new music, jazz and Aboriginal artists.

The Salt Chuck City Ensemble is Kevin  Elaschuk (trumpet), David Say (sax), Pat Ernst (violin), Lan Tung (erhu), Ron Samworth (guitar), Michael Park (piano), Paul Blaney (bass), Skye Brooks (drums), Remy Siu (laptop), Deanna Gestrin, Alison Jenkins, Will George, and Russell Wallace (vocals).

The week leading up to this performance, artist Russell Wallace will explore playback transformation of ancient found reel-to-reel audio tape which he will cut and weave into a neo Coast Salish cape. You can follow it online at “Echoic Chamber.

_____

POST-CONCERT TALK BACK SESSION

Third in the series, this post concert talk back session features composers and originators of Neo Nativism.

_______________________________

Biographies

Russell Wallace is a composer, producer and is a traditional Lil’wat singer. Russell’s music has been part of a number of soundtracks (film, video, television) and theatre/dance productions. He was the composer in residence for the Chinook Winds Aboriginal Dance program from 1996-2003 at the Banff Centre for the Arts. He has produced CDs that have been nominated for awards at the Junos, Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards, and at the Native American Music Awards in the USA. Currently Russell works and teaches at the NEC Native Education College. Russell was commissioned by the Nunavut Government to compose music for the Formation of the Nunavut Territories inaugural Gala in April 1999, by the University of Toronto for Aboriginal Music Days in 2000, and by the Westcoast Sacred Arts Society in Vancouver to compose a new choral work with Hussein Janmohamed for the Dalai Lama’s visit to Vancouver in 2004.

Remy Siu ( 蕭逸南 ) is an emerging composer based in Vancouver, BC. He studied at SFU Contemporary Arts with David MacIntyre, Owen Underhill, Janet Danielson, Jeffrey Ryan, Arne Eigenfeldt, and Barry Truax. His work has been performed by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, the Victoria Symphony, the Turning Point Ensemble, the Erato Ensemble, Musica Intima, and Quatuor Bozzini. He also composes and performs with Dissonant Disco (a Vancouver music collective) and Hong Kong Exile (an interdisciplinary art collective). Currently, he works on the staff of “Sound of Dragon Society,” a non-profit focused on asian music while “preserving heritage, [and] seeking innovation.” He has worked with Henry Daniel, Steven Hill, Rob Kitsos, and MACHiNENOiSY, among others in the Vancouver arts community. In 2012, he was artist-in-residence at the New Westminster River Market. He has produced two sold-out shows: ASCENSION (string quintet + dance) and Attacca 2012. He was featured in the Georgia Straight 2012 Fall Arts Preview. The Vancouver Sun described his music as “characterized by vibrant, driving rhythms and brash sonorities.”

Pat Ernst has been playing the violin for 20+ years. He grew up in Whitehorse, Yukon where he studied the Suzuki violin method as well as celtic and bluegrass fiddle. He has since completed a diploma in classical music as well as a diploma in jazz studies from Capilano University. He is a local violin teacher teaching at Capilano University in North Vancouver as well as in Squamish and Vancouver.

Playing a dynamic role in the Canadian music scene, Lan Tung is an erhu performer, composer, producer, and administrator. Originally from Taiwan, she incorporates Chinese music with contemporary expressions in her works. At the same time, an intensive interest in music outside her tradition has been a major drive in her artistic explorations. Lan is the leader of the JUNO nominated Orchid Ensemble, and she performs with Birds of Paradox, Tandava, Vancouver Inter-Cultural Orchestra, Mozaico Flamenco Dance Theatre, among many other projects. She has toured extensively in North America, working with composers, musicians, dancers, visual and media artists of various cultural backgrounds. Since moving to Canada in 1994, Lan has premiered numerous contemporary compositions, including chamber, solo, orchestral and electro-acoustic works, by Canadian composers John Oliver, Hope Lee, Moshe Denburg, Mark Armanini, Jin Zhang, Janet Danielson, Barry Truax, Neil Weisensel, Paul Plimley, Yawen V. Wang, Farshid Samandari, Michael Vincent, and Grace Lee.

Michael Park is a composer and pianist with a keen interest in speech, humour, and collaboration. His music aims to give audiences an experience beyond the realm of traditional concert-going. Heralded for his innovative projects, his Ted Talk Experiencing Disease Through Music has been described as moving, haunting, and an amazing translation of Alzheimer’s. Awarded the Gold Medal and BMO Advocacy Award, his opera, Diagnosis: Diabetes will be premiered during the Boston Metro Opera’s 2014-15 season. Michael’s compositions have been performed in Vancouver at the Sonic Boom Music Festival and the Songfire Festival of Song, as well as concerts presented by Music on Main, the Erato Ensemble, and pianist, Corey Hamm. His music has been presented in Winnipeg by Flipside Opera and the Contemporary Opera Lab, and in New York by Opera On Tap. Currently a DMA Candidate at The University of British Columbia, Michael previously completed graduate studies at The University of Western Ontario (2009), and undergraduate studies at the University of Manitoba (2007). His principal composition teachers include Dorothy Chang, Omar Daniel, Peter Paul Koprowski, Gordon Fitzell, and Orjan Sandred.

Warren Arcand currently resides on Galiano Island, BC. He’s primarily known for his work in performance art. The bulk of his work has been presented in Vancouver, with occasional forays to Victoria, Toronto, and Saskatchewan communities. His family comes from Muskeg Lake and Big River First Nations in Saskatchewan. His current interests include making images, text-based work and short film and video. He’s the past artistic director for the Centre of Indigenous Theatre, Toronto. An important formative influence on his life and work has been and continues to be his association with the artistic communities surrounding the Western Front and grunt Gallery.

Tony Wilson is “unquestionably one of the most original guitar stylists on the Canadian scene.” He has studied with many acclaimed jazz musicians including Oliver Gannon, Dave Holland, John Abercrombie, Kevin Eubanks and Steve Coleman. Tony’s compositions have been played by artists as diverse as the NOW Orchestra, The Hard Rubber Orchestra, Myra Melford, Kokoro Dance, Marilyn Crispel, Francois Houle and Zubot and Dawson. His five main active groups are the Tony Wilson Sextet, the powerhouse Albert Ayler tribute band called Flowers for Albert, the Irish-influenced group Celtic Works, the Pugs and Crows, and the John Zorn inspired Bugs Inside.

      

]]>
25 October 2014, 12:55 pm 3d30137f703b20a2a4b782dbc878c64f
<![CDATA[Collective Works: Questions and Answers]]> Found: residence, award

FREE

In conjunction with their performance of LIQUID TRUST, international video installation artists Susanne Clausen and Pavlo Keresty of Szuper Gallery, and musician-in-residence and curator of Music and Movement Mondays Ben Brown introduce their approaches to collaboration, mixed media, and contemporary practices.

_______________________

Biographies

Szuper Gallery (London, UK and Munich, Germany) is a co-operation between Susanne Clausen and Pavlo Keresty that presents filmed and live performances, video installations, interventions, and curatorial projects that incorporate multi-media installations and crash choreography. Szuper Gallery has exhibited at various international venues including the Institute of Contemporary Arts (London), Kuntshalle Wien (Vienna), Whitechapel Art Gallery (London), Lenbachhaus Museum (Munich), Kunsthalle Helsinki (Helsinki), Western Front (Vancouver), Shedhalle (Zurich), and Zeh Gallery (Kiev).

Ben Brown is a Vancouver-based musician, composer, and member of the Juno award-winning group Pugs and Crows. He has collaborated with contemporary and ballet dancers including Justine Chambers, Heidi Bunting, Lee Su-Feh, Kenny Pearl, Edmond Kilpatrick, and Megan Walker Straight. He is a mainstay in Vancouver’s creative music scene, performing with Jill Barber, Michael Bates Quartet, The Unsupervised, The Crackling, and the C.R. Avery Band. He is the founder of a new weekly collaborative series between live musicians and dancers entitled Music and Movement Mondays. He has recently returned from a Canadian tour with Tony Wilson and the Pugs and Crows and his duo with Vancouver vocalist/pianist Alicia Hansen is set to release their new album entitled “Companion” in the fall, 2014.

 

]]>
20 July 2014, 12:38 pm 16d9d1a59fd9e3fc29174843b45879dc
<![CDATA[Krista Belle Stewart]]> Found: residency

Vancouver-based artist Krista Belle Stewart will be producing a new media work along with research during her two-month residency. Her work engages the complexities of intention and interpretation made possible by archival material. The work approaches mediation and storytelling to unfold the interplay between personal and institutional history. Stewart has exhibited in numerous group exhibitions, most recently as part of Fiction/Non-fiction at the Esker Foundation (2013), Where Does it Hurt? at Artspeak (2014), and the Western Front production Music from the New Wilderness (2014). She is a member of the Upper Nicola Band of the Okanagan Nation.

]]>
15 July 2014, 12:47 pm 77be7b811db753f0eb3fb3c904149d3e
<![CDATA[Oscar Tusquets Blanca – The Gaulino Chair]]> Found: award
Oscar T. Blanca, designer (Spanish, b. 1941), B.D. Barcelona Designs, manufacturer Gaulino Armchair, 1987 Indianapolis Museum of Art, Robertine Daniels Art Fund in Memory of Her Late Husband, Richard Monroe Fairbanks Sr., and Her Late Son, Michael Fairbanks, 2013.4

Oscar T. Blanca, designer (Spanish, b. 1941), B.D. Barcelona Designs, manufacturer
Gaulino Armchair, 1987
Indianapolis Museum of Art, Robertine Daniels Art Fund in Memory of Her Late Husband, Richard Monroe Fairbanks Sr., and Her Late Son, Michael Fairbanks, 2013.4

Oscar Tusquets Blanca (who prefers we use both surnames) was born in 1941. The Barcelona native trained as an architect and began working as a designer of furniture and objects in 1972 with BD (Barcelona Design). Since then he has won several award,s including the Spanish National Design Award. Tusquets Blanca designed the Gaulino chair in 1987 and it is a prime example of Spanish design and functional art. Every angle of the Gaulino chair has beautiful complex lines bringing joy to your eyes as you follow along its subtle, sculptural curves. This is the result of his friendship with Salvador Dali and his interests in painting and writing. It seems clear he was also inspired by Antoni Gaudi and Carlo Mollino for which he named the chair.

The Gaulino chair, winner of the 1989 Industrial Design Prize, has a handmade appearance yet it was his first industrial project in wood. Its structure is made of solid ash and is available in a natural varnish, oak stain or black stain. The oak seat can be upholstered in black, natural, or honey leather. It can be stacked, but what a crime that would be! This is a gorgeous piece that I want to sit in, touch, and be close to in order to study every detail. The anamorphic shapes speak to me and fascinate me. I am not surprised to learn that Tusquets Blanca considers this chair one of his best works. The Gaulino chair is now a part of the Design Arts permanent collection at the IMA.

— Marika Klemm, ASID, Marika Designs, LLC

Tusquets Blanca’s Gaulino chair is an inspired mix of masculine and feminine lines. It may be a dining chair but I prefer to see it as a stand-alone chair that exudes an international design ethos of beauty and functionality. At first glance, the Gaulino chair has a masculine stance on the floor that dares you to have a seat. Yet its machismo belies the feminine, almost sensual, lines of the seat and arms which draw you in and seal the deal. Some will use the Gaulino with the matching table. Others will place it in any room as a side chair to add a sophisticated, sublime and lean design element for the occasional aperitif, but I would use it as the ultimate desk chair, in black, at a small writing desk.

— Michael Lubarsky, DAS Member

 

]]>
16 August 2013, 2:21 pm 7caa5db64db9e341c31482c07a46aba4
<![CDATA[Straw Bale Gardening: A How-To Guide]]> Found: jury

1. Start with a bale of Straw.

Bale1

2. Saturate it with water for about 3 days.

Watering a straw bale

3. Sprinkle the top of the bale with 1/2 cup granular nitrogen fertilizer and continue watering, adding 1/2 cup fertilizer for the next 3 days. Then for the next 3 days only add 1/4 cup fertilizer and water.

4. On day 10, begin digging 3 holes in the the top of the bale, a little larger than the plant pot diameter. Then fill the holes with potting soil or compost, or a combination, and water gently.

A straw bale with holes in it

A straw bale with dirt filled in the holes

Be sure to dig your holes slightly larger than the plant pot diameter

5. When the soil is no longer hot to the touch, plant and water gently. Clean gallon milk jugs with their bottoms removed make a good cloche if the temperature drops suddenly!

A planted straw bale with a watering pale

6. Continue watering gently and occasionally add dilute fertilizer or compost tea about once per week. The continued watering will leach the fertilizer out.

A straw bale with plants in it

Advantages to Straw Bale Gardening

  • Easier (raised) for folks with limited mobility
  • Useful if your garden soil is poor
  • Useful if you have little or no soil in which to garden
  • Virtually no weeding (Don’t use hay bales!)
  • Don’t have to rotate crops, use a fresh bale each year
  • At season’s end, provides great compost for rest of garden

Possible Disadvantages to Straw Bale Gardening

  • May look a little messy as the bale decomposes
  • Bales dry out quickly, so ultimately may use too much water…jury is still out on this one

 

 

]]>
5 June 2013, 8:00 am b7dfbe038892baee8e89a874f91645ef
<![CDATA[Take Our #KidstoWork Day: An exhibition of AGO careers]]> Found: residence

By Brittany Reynolds, assistant, Recruitment, Training and Volunteer Programs

Touring the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize 2014 Exhibition.
Talking marketing with Angela Olano.
In the kitchen with Chef Renee.
Goofing around in the Kids' Gallery.

On Nov. 5, 2014, eight of our employees’ Grade 9 relatives joined us for the day and had the chance to see the variety of career opportunities here at the AGO.

The day kicked off with a tour of the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize 2014 Exhibition by project assistant Danielle St-Amour, where the students learned more about different styles of photography and the importance of the Prize at the AGO.

Then they met with marketing manager Angela Olano to discuss more about promoting AGO exhibitions, and they were tasked with creating a plan to advertise the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize to their high school peers.

To end the morning, executive sous chef Renee Bellefeuille taught the students how to prepare profiteroles to make their very own chocolate éclairs. Students also had the chance to create their own menu that would include a starter and main course before their chocolate éclair dessert.

The afternoon’s activities included a vault tour by registrar Cindy Brouse and a tour of the conservation lab by sculpture and decorative arts conservator Lisa Ellis.

Last but certainly not least, the manager of our artist-in-residence and adult programs, Paola Poletto, spoke to students about the upcoming Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibition and the group brainstormed what types of youth programs would be appealing to students in their high schools.

Thank you to all who participated in the AGO’s Take Our Kids to Work Program! This year marked the 20th anniversary of the program, which was started by The Learning Partnership in 1994 and gives Grade 9 students a headstart on their future by helping them explore career options and connecting them directly with the world of work.

Search the hashtag #KidsToWork on Twitter and Instagram to see what happened at other workplaces this year.

]]>
10 November 2014, 12:14 pm a2d40b8c45d7f5b6bc254093c721e36b
<![CDATA[Join us for the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement]]> Found: awarded, award
The crowd at last year's Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement, Nov. 7, 2013.

The crowd at last year’s Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement, Nov. 7, 2013.

This Wednesday, October 29, join the AGO, Aimia, the Walrus Foundation and host Garvia Bailey for the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement. The public voting period, which began in August, ends at 11:59 p.m. tonight, and one of the Prize’s four shortlisted artists will be awarded $50,000 at the private event. Watch the livestream starting at 7 p.m. watch the livestream on the Aimia | Photography Prize homepage or The Walrus‘s website.

And, if you haven’t yet, cast your vote!


Image via Twitter.

Image via Twitter.


About Garvia Bailey
Garvia Bailey has been a broadcast journalist for more than 10 years and currently hosts Good Morning Toronto on JAZZ.FM91. She spent 10 years with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. She got her start in the world of independent film with the start up production company Channel Zero – telling stories of social unrest around the world and with the CBC, she served as the host of Canada Live and Radio 2 Top 20 on CBC Radio 2, Backstage Pass on CBC-TV, Big City Small World and was a contributor at cbcmusic.ca. Throughout her career in broadcasting she has turned the spotlight on emerging talent from across the GTA and has interviewed many celebrated international artists including Jimmy Cliff, Maestro Fresh Wes, Russell Peters, Melanie Fiona and M.I.A.

Follow Garvia on Twitter

]]>
27 October 2014, 9:35 am 866969ccf22cc0d3f79093049755abb3
<![CDATA[Art on wheels: Meet the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize Art Truck]]> Found: opportunity, residency, award

For the first time, the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize is bringing its talented finalists to the streets. The travelling Aimia | AGO Photography Prize Art Truck will feature video footage of the four shortlisted artists discussing their practices, offering a glimpse into their artwork and allowing visitors an opportunity to vote for who should win the $50,000 prize. Track the location of the Art Truck using the hashtag #ArtIsMoving or follow the Prize on Twitter @AimiaAGOPrize.

The Art Truck arrives in Toronto on Sept. 27, 2014, making its first stop at the Sony Centre for the Performing Arts on Front Street East and continues onto a number of locations across the city.

The Art Truck was created to break the Prize out of gallery walls and making it accessible by all who walk by. Voters will have the opportunity to win an expenses-paid trip to Toronto, a private tour with an AGO curator, dinner for two at the AGO’s FRANK restaurant, tickets to the exclusive winner announcement and 15,000 Aeroplan® Miles.

Making appearances at several key locations and festivals across Toronto, the Art Truck can be found at:

The Prize, co-presented by Aimia and the AGO, will award each of the four artists a six-week artist residency in Canada and will feature their work in an AGO exhibition, on now through Jan. 4, 2015. The winner will be chosen by public vote via the Prize’s website and Facebook page until Oct. 27, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. The winner will be announced on Oct. 29, 2014, at the AGO, and the Art Truck offers a unique way of voting by using iPads, so that all visitors to the truck can have their say.

The 2014 finalists are:

  • David Hartt (Canada);
  • Elad Lassry (Israel/USA);
  • Nandipha Mntambo (South Africa); and
  • Lisa Oppenheim (USA).

Search for #ArtIsMoving on Twitter to follow the Art Truck around town. For updates on the Prize, further details on the shortlisted artists and additional information, please visit AimiaAGOPhotographyPrize.com and follow @AimiaAGOPrize on Twitter.

]]>
25 September 2014, 1:26 pm d049e5cb5621d28a52c6e96f88d3c2db
<![CDATA[TTTOW - A unique film festival]]> Found: opportunity, submissions, submission, deadline
TTTOW or Taxi Takes on The World is a unique film festival where anyone across the world can participate. All you need is a camcorder (a smartphone will do!), a taxi ride and the ensuing conversation with the taxi driver - recorded and sent to the organizers. 




Yes, its as simple as that. But what exactly is this film festival about? 

The Taxi Takes on the World is a crowd sourced interactive documentary about conversations between drivers and passengers from inside taxis all around the globe. This user generated project aims to harness honest grassroots interactions and present the world’s ‘video takes’ on matters that affect us all. 


“Talks inside taxis are usually between people of diverse backgrounds and so offer a variety of perspectives. These ‘takes’ have the power to blur boundaries and bridge cultures. The Taxi Takes on the World will showcase crowd sourced video stories that mainstream media ignores about times when people find common ground and break stereotypes about the ‘other’. Mobile technology allows a democratization of media which aligns with my work’s vision for how new media will shape our future. This film festival will be part of a traveling film festival and offers a great opportunity to showcase citizens’ stories of brotherhood” - Vandana Sood - Giddings, Creator, Founder, Executive Director.

Date & Venues


The film festival will be held from The 21ST of September 2013 to the 2nd of October 2013 in Jammu and Kashmir, New Delhi, Punjab and Manipur. Kashmir and Manipur are both conflict states of India. 

This film festival is a partnership between The Taxi Takes on the World project and Standing Together to Enable Peace, Trust (STEP) a non-profit organization established in New Delhi in 2009.

Themes


The film festival will focus on certain broad themes:

  • Religious and ethnic conflict
  • War and terror
  • Race
  • Gender
  • Class
  • Culture

Each of these broad global topics has regional nuances that the mainstream media often overlooks. Through the prism of the taxi, where every day people from often widely disparate backgrounds meet, this film festival will tell a story about how, given the right space, we all can understand each other and speak a common language.

Where & How to

Need guidance on how to go about it? Check out this short prezi that suggests the kind of questions you can ask to begin a conversation and start your take. Find the application procedure, rules & regulations all on the TTOW submissions page.

Hurry, the submissions deadline is September 10, 2013!

]]>
22 August 2013, 1:40 pm d0adb23994c64fad4eae2c21551a7229
<![CDATA[How Apple's new computers impact filmmaking]]> Found: calling, call

The new Macbook Pro and iMac announced by Apple on October 24 heralds a major shift in the way PCs will be designed and have a cumulative impact on digital filmmaking.



Below are some of the major upgrades that affect the digital filmmaking process:

1.    No Optical Drive: Both the new Macbook Pro with retina display and the new iMac have done away with the DVD drive, with Apple calling it  obsolete in the age of blazing broadband speeds when movies and television can be easily streamed online or downloaded. The new iMac does have 2 Thunderbolt ports and 4 USB 3.0 ports to allow connection of external hard drives and other devices. Seeing that Apple is usually the trendsetter in computer design, we can expect competitors like HP and Dell to follow suit. This could spell the death knell for the DVD industry, and moviemakers will now be looking to go completely digital. Of course, home theatre systems and bluray players will ensure that the home video market doesn’t completely evaporate in the near future, but the transition to a more 'online' movie watching experience is surely on its way.  

2.    Much better screen resolutions: The new iMac has a full HD display (1,920 × 1,080 pixels) for the 21.5” version and 2,560 × 1,440 pixel for the 27” version. It certainly translates into a better film/video watching experience and the computer being used for watching movies and gaming more than ever. The Macbook Pro with Retina display boats of a tantalizing 2,560 x 1,600 at 227 pixels per inch. This one has four times the screen resolution of the previous 13-inch version of the MacBook Pro.

3.    Super powerful processors: The new 21.5” iMac starts with a config of Intel Core i5 Quad Core 2.7 Ghz Processor with 8GB RAM , 1GB dedicated NVIDIA graphics and 1TB hard disk. Even the Macbook Pro with Retina display is all about performance, speed and graphics. It boasts of an Intel dual-core i5 Ivy Bridge processor clock at 2.5 Ghz (minimum) For graphics it has the Intel HD 4,000 graphics support. The RAM is 8 GB and its all-flash storage has three configurations available: 256 GB, 512 GB, or 768 GB. Such top-end configurations in the base models bode well for popular film editing applications like Final Cut Pro.  Apple will be looking to release an even more powerful version of its flagship video editing app to utilize the full potential of its new line of computer devices.

The rise of smartphones and tablets coupled with faster broadband speeds have already given a fillip to the various kinds of digital filmmaking, both in terms of production and post production.  Apple’s new line of smart computers will be prove to be another turning point, particularly because the optical drive has been dropped across its iMac and Macbook Pro ranges.

What do you think of Apple’s new devices, and their potential impact on filmmaking?

]]>
26 October 2012, 12:04 pm 011880692e3f5039023c6a19fbf277a8
<![CDATA[George Clooney honoured at Palm Springs Film Festival]]> Found: awards, award

George Clooney will receive the Chairman's Award for his acting work in The Descendants and his directing of The Ides of March at the 2012 Palm Springs International Film Festival.

The award will be presented on January 7 at PSIFF's annual Awards Gala, a black-tie event that always hands out an array of awards to luminaries who figure to be in the Oscar race.

Like the awards given at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in late January, the Palm Springs event has become a valuable stop on the Oscar campaign trail. Previous recipients of the Chairman's Award include Dustin Hoffman, Nicole Kidman and Ben Affleck.

Oscar-nominated actress Michelle Williams will also be rewarded for her portrayal of Marilyn Monroe in “My Week With Marilyn,” which is already generating Oscar buzz.

Williams, 31, will receive the Desert Palm Achievement Actress Award at the Palm Springs International Film Festival awards gala at the Palm Springs Convention Center. Previous recipients include Academy Award winners Natalie Portman, Marion Cotillard, Charlize Theron and Kate Winslet.

“My Week With Marilyn,” which opens Wednesday in limited distribution, premiered Oct. 9 at the New York International Film Festival. Directed by Simon Curtis, the film was presented Nov. 6 as part of the AFI Fest at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, where Monroe put her hand and footprints in cement in 1952.

The Palm Springs International Film Festival runs Jan. 5-16 2012 at various venues in Palm Springs

Sources: mydesert.com & Reuters

Technorati Tags: ,

]]>
23 November 2011, 8:20 am ac83454604d81558e40a5489757995b8
<![CDATA[Final Cut Pro X released]]> Found: calls, call
Apple has released Final Cut Pro X, the latest version of its professional video-editing software and one of the most popular programs for digital filmmaking.
Its actually been two days since FCP X was launched, and of course there’s been a strong buzz about it in the market. Video professionals were not only impressed with the new features, but with the new price too. Final Cut Pro X is available in the Mac App Store for $299.99. Compare that to 2009, when the fully loaded Final Cut Studio retailed for $999.99.

Final Cut Pro X is a big update for the powerful editing suite, in no small part because it is now (finally) built with 64-bit support. That means that the app will be able to take advantage of the additional memory space in Mac OS X Snow Leopard and the upcoming Mac OS X Lion.

Installing Final Cut Pro X
Since the only way to get Final Cut Pro X is through the Mac App Store, installation is easy: You just click "Buy" in the store, and the app's icon appears in your Finder, ready to run. You'll be able to install it on five Macs, and you receive updates automatically. The program requires at least a Core 2 Duo-based Mac running Snow Leopard, a decent video processor, 2.4GB of disk space, and 2GB RAM (4GB recommended).


The big new feature is called the Magnetic Timeline, which takes a trackless approach to editing. Like Adobe, Apple has also put a lot of effort into what it calls Content Auto-Analysis, which is another way of saying that the software uses meta-tags to better organize and import content, based on shot type, media format and other information.

Check out this video Apple released to show off the new features in Final Cut Pro X:



]]>
24 June 2011, 10:11 am 828ed496d384fb6fa2923179133ff492
<![CDATA[Shortie Awards Youth Film Festival]]> Found: submit, awards, award, entries


Hollyn Randolph just mailed me in about the forthcoming Shortie Awards film festival.

The Shortie Awards film festival will be held June 5, 2011 in Arlington, VA a suburb of Washington D.C. The Shortie Awards recognizes original short film productions created by student filmmakers, ages 7-18, and their teachers.

This year we have entries from 26 states and 14 countries and India has 36 entries which is the largest number from outside of the US.
Apparently the last date for submitting the entries was April 1, 2011. But we can look forward to the screenings and the winners. Those who live around Arlingtom and Washington DC should attend the event!

]]>
6 May 2011, 4:28 am eaf309efd7724c81c4b80892e456a4ca
<![CDATA[Short Film: Damn Your Eyes]]> Found: awards, award

David Guglielmo, an alumni of School of Visual Arts, New York emailed me his short film titled Damn Your Eyes.
damn your eyes

Damn Your Eyes a Spaghetti Western-influenced revenge film shot on the Sony EX1 digital camera in the NY Metropolitan area for $5,000. It has been successful at film festivals and recently won two awards.


WINNER: "Best Student Film" at Royal Flush Festival '09
WINNER: "Best More Than Horror Short" at Buffalo Screams Horror Festival '10


I liked the visual quality of the film: the lighting, the locations, set, framing, composition etc. The DoP used the Sony EXI camcorder given to him pretty well. Most of the actors did a really professional job and that took the movie experience a notch higher. The screenplay could have been written better. Some of the moments in the movie were clichéd and boring but on the whole it is a decent production. What do you think of the movie? Please watch and comment (feed subscribers will need to visit the blog to watch it).

David Guglielmo must be congratulated for doing his excellent direction. Considering he is relatively new to this profession, he has done a laudable job that commands appreciation.
 Digital filmmaking is indeed growing from strength to strength.

]]>
26 April 2011, 4:52 am 776bfdbc7b6be1364d824c007ec92690
<![CDATA[Tribeca Film Festival Launches Online Version]]> Found: submit
I had recently blogged about Tribeca Film Festival's announcement of filmmaking grants for funding documentaries of social significance. Well now it has gone a step further further launched an online version of the increasingly popular movie fest.

According to Hollywood Reporter, the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival, which kicks off from April 20 and ends on May 1 in New York city, will have a new online component where audiences will be able to watch live streams of events and interact with other audience members.

Online audiences will also be allowed to submit questions to a host of festival executives and other notable guests and access detailed information on all of the online fest filmmakers. There will also be a Future of Film blog that will include posts from film and technology experts.

If you want to know about the screenings at Tribeca 2011, check out the Tribeca Film Festival 2011 film guide .

]]>
23 March 2011, 6:50 pm 0c4b2e928c429528894ee3a1ebb2055c
<![CDATA[Emerging artists wanting to participate in the Splendid festival read on...(May 2011)]]> Found: calling, call
Calling creatives of all stripes who have an inquisitive mind, an innovative approach and a desire to collaborate to participate in the 2011 Splendid program.

]]>
20 March 2011, 1:03 pm a0ec52e369c8df0b4b378ef64b241d2e
<![CDATA[Salon Films launches filmmaker training program]]> Found: opportunity
Salon Films will launch a cross-border training program for young Singapore and Hong Kong filmmakers, and a funding initiative in connection with the Hong Kong government subsidy for filmmakers.

The training program is organized with the Media Development Authority of Singapore to bring budding Singaporean filmmakers to work in Hong Kong and China.

The program began in Hong Kong, in partnership with the Academy of Film of the Hong Kong Baptist University, and continues in Beijing, Shanghai, Suzhou, in cooperation with the China Film Foundation and CCTV, and will conclude in the Hengdian studio, lasting three weeks in each city.

The film crew is shooting a documentary to commemorate the 20th anniversary the establishment of economic relations between China and Singapore.

"Asian culture shares common origins," Wang said, "The training program is aimed at providing an opportunity for young filmmakers across Asia to meet, exchange ideas, and make films that speak to our mutual cultural roots."

To capitalize on the current prevalence of Hong Kong-Chinese co-productions and the growing film industry in China, the program also intends for young filmmakers and film students to obtain hands-on practical experience in China.

Film students at the Academy of Film of the Baptist University will also join the Salon team in Beijing and Hengdian.

]]>
10 January 2011, 9:02 am 2c1f2abad90e1b3a777f8cf10e1b2292
<![CDATA[Tribeca announces filmmaking grants]]> Found: submission, deadline, award
The Tribeca Film Institute announced Wednesday its submission period for grants is now open. TFI will award more than $500,000 in filmmaker support through 2011 and more than $100,000 through its new TFI Documentary Fund, presented by HBO.


The Gucci Tribeca Documentary Fund provides finishing grants totaling $100,000 to feature-length documentaries that highlight and humanize topics of social significance. The TFI Sloan Filmmaker Fund will award up to $140,000 to support compelling narrative filmmaking that explores scientific, mathematic and technological themes.

The Tribeca All Access Program will continue cultivating relationships between filmmakers from traditionally underrepresented communities and film industry executives, and provide each 2011 participant with $10,000. And, the TFI Latin America Media Arts Fund will support film and video artists working in narrative or documentary film and living in Mexico, Central and South America.


“We are excited to expand the reach and depth of our programming to support individual artists in the field,”
 said TFI artistic director Beth Janson.


The early submission deadline is Nov. 8; final deadline is Dec. 8. More info: tribecafilminstitute.org.

]]>
17 September 2010, 1:08 pm 0d32c63914b979f28151b88278a36904
<![CDATA[Taiwan's Tsai Liang is Asian Filmmaker of the Year]]> Found: awards, award, jury
South Korea's most prestigious film festival said Wednesday it has chosen Taiwanese director Tsai Ming Liang as its Asian Filmmaker of the Year.


The Pusan International Film Festival praised Tsai's work over the past three decades for pioneering unexplored areas that overcome the limitations of the art film industry.

"His 30-year-long devotion to filmmaking has greatly influenced Asian cinema and made considerable contributions to enhance the global status of Asian cinema," it said in a statement.


"He is renowned for seeking fresh ways of communicating with his audience... We can find the root of his endless spirit of challenging himself and the borderlines of art in his earlier works in the 1990s."

Malaysian-born Tsai is best known for "Vive L'Amour" that won the Golden Lion (best picture) award at the Venice Film Festival in 1994, and "The River" that won the Silver Bear/Special Jury Prize at the 1997 Berlin International Film Festival.


The 52-year-old has also won numerous awards with other films.

He is considered a leading exponent of the "Second New Wave" -- a group of Taiwanese directors in the 1990s who produced films with realistic and sympathetic portrayals of life rather than melodramas or action pictures.


The festival, held in the southern port city of Busan since 1996, will be staged from October 7-15 this year.

]]>
6 September 2010, 4:47 am 3096856fd18a45600538a63171daf7c9
<![CDATA[Jumpstart Your Film and Television Career: 5 powerful TIPS on how to land more tv film jobs than you can handle]]> Found: opportunity
This is a guest post by Ian Agard of ianagard.com. Ian is a Toronto based writer/director/film producer who loves to entertain and inspire people through his movies and his filmmaking blog.



As you probably know, one of the most desirable yet challenging industries to make a living from is in the film and television industry.

By far, the most commonly asked question I receive from people throughout my six years working as actor, screenwriter, director and film producer is...how do you get into the industry and make a living?

As a film producer; I have interviewed, hired and worked with several casts and crews while making my films. It becomes quite easy to notice the difference between individuals who struggle to find film/tv work and those who make a comfortable living.

Is it about luck?

Or

Who you know?

I would like to share with you 5 POWERFUL TIPS that will help you jumpstart your film/tv career and get you on the road towards landing more paying industry work than you can handle.


TIP Number One: Be Willing To Work For Free

I know, you probably didn’t want to hear that but it’s imperative that you are willing to either work for free or very low pay. It’s a sacrifice that many in the entertainment industry must do when starting out, however, you’ll have the opportunity to meet others in the business as well as learn on the job. Taking “free” jobs quickly leads to full time careers.


TIP Number Two: Attitude Is Everything

This is one of the most important tips regarding developing a successful film/tv industry career. More important than your talent, your experience or your education; your attitude will determine how far you will rise within your career.
It will determine if people will refer job opportunities to you or hire you again for future projects. You must be a flexible, professional, team oriented person who is committed to “serving” the story/project to the best of your ability.

Production sets are full of egos, there’s no need for one more.

TIP Number Three: Recognize and seizure opportunity

You’ve probably heard the old saying luck is when preparation meets opportunity. I like to believe in a slightly different statement, luck = opportunity + willingness.
A certain film/tv industry work opportunity might present itself to you; you’re prepared...but are you willing to maybe work for free, work for low pay, work 12 hour days, be team-oriented, be flexible and agreeable or go the extra mile to help the project succeed.

TIP Number Four: Network and be visible

The reality of the film/TV industry is that most production jobs are never advertised. Those positions are usually filled through word of mouth and pre-established relationships. That’s why it is extremely important for you to always be committed to meeting new like-minded people.
The best places to meet and connect with people who share your zeal and passion are:

1) Onset while shooting a movie or television show
2) Through industry specific classes
3) At film festivals

TIP Number Five: Always be learning

As humans, we are learning machines. We are most alive and functioning closest to our potential when we are learning, adapting, adjusting and finding new ways, approaches and techniques to improve our lives (and our careers)in some way.

No matter how many years working experience you might have within the film/TV industry it would be hugely important for you to maintain a beginner’s mindset. A beginner looks constantly for one new tibit, one or more ways to expand on their current expertise.

To learn more valuable tips and in-depth advice, listen to my MP3 60 minute audio interview with film and television expert and veteran Stephen Dranitsaris at: www.ianagard.com/tv-film-jobs

]]>
23 April 2010, 5:57 pm 0f5b78331581dc53a92c92be85a8445a
<![CDATA[Mark Neville: A growing disparity between the haves and the have-nots]]> Found: residence

In December 2011, Mark Neville travelled down from Glasgow and took a room in the London School of Economics' halls of residence. For the next five weeks, he meandered around the freezing capital, having been commissioned by The New York Times Magazine to capture London in whatever way he wished.

]]>
22 November 2014, 6:00 pm f29c1d93ee3a279993d424f245077269
<![CDATA[What happened when Glasgow School of Art went up in smoke?]]> Found: call

The call wasn't met with much concern. Over the years, at the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service's Johnstone command centre, there had been many call-outs to the famous Glasgow School of Art (GSA), always to a drill or false alarm. Nevertheless, dispatchers immediately radioed through to the three closest fire engines.

]]>
24 October 2014, 6:00 pm ce181cdf96274390e896e93eefba0a32
<![CDATA[Denise De La Rue interview: How Picasso inspired my film A Cry for Peace]]> Found: call

When the mexican artist Denise De La Rue first saw Pablo Picasso’s 1937 anti-war masterpiece Guernica, as a 10-year-old girl visiting the Museo de Prado in Madrid in the early 1980s, it didn’t so much leave a lasting impression as ingrain in her a call to action.

]]>
3 October 2014, 5:10 am 58ab3ce42104180cd2ce7ad5f0784add
<![CDATA[Lowry Art Trickery?]]> Found: calls, call
Wigan Today reports that an art lover from Cheshire accused of tricking a dealer into buying a fake LS Lowry has told a court he thought the painting was genuine. Maurice Taylor - who calls himself Lord Taylor Windsor after buying the title on the internet for £1,000 - sold the Mill Street scene to businessman David Smith during a meeting in a Ritz hotel room in 2007. Mr Smith, managing director of Neptune Fine Arts, paid over £230,000 before discovering the work was bogus. Taylor, 60, who lives in a mansion near Congleton, had bought the snowy scene featuring matchstick-style figures three years earlier through friend and Lowry expert Ivan Aird. Mr Aird acted as an agent for the previous owner Martin Heaps who, the crown say, sold the picture for £7,500 with an invoice describing it as "After Lowry" because it was created by artist Arthur Delaney. Prosecuting at Chester Crown Court, Sion Ap Mihangel, said Taylor knew the picture was fake, invented history to boost its provenance, and doctored the invoice so it appeared he was sold a genuine work. Taylor admitted telling his buyer and auctioneers Bonhams he bought the painting several decades earlier from industrialist Eddie Rosenfeld. He said he did not know why he lied but claimed Mr Aird asked him not to say he bought the painting through him. He said Mr Aird told him the painting was genuine and said: "When he sold me that picture there was never a question in his mind. I didn't question him, he told me it was original." A team of experts from Bonhams later assessed the work and were taken in by it. They provided a £600,000 insurance valuation and laid on the red carpet treatment, hoping Taylor would sell it through them. Mr Mihangel said Taylor acquired the Bonhams valuation to strengthen his selling position and to ensure a private sale. Taylor denies denies six counts of fraud and one of forging an invoice. The trial continues. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

]]>
3 March 2009, 1:23 pm 742b0215e6c8dc96600e8ca9f935efd4
<![CDATA[Caged Art Recognised]]> Found: awarded, award
The New York Times reports that 1974 Tehching Hsieh, a young Taiwanese performance artist working as a seaman, walked down the gangplank of an oil tanker docked in the Delaware River and slipped into the United States. His destination: Manhattan, center of the art world. Once there, though, Mr. Hsieh found himself ensnared in the benumbing life of an illegal immigrant. With the downtown art scene vibrating around him, he eked out a living at Chinese restaurants and construction jobs, feeling alien, alienated and creatively barren until it came to him: He could turn his isolation into art. Inside an unfinished loft, he could build himself a beautiful cage, shave his head, stencil his name onto a uniform and lock himself away for a year. Thirty years later Mr. Hsieh’s “Cage Piece” is on display at the Museum of Modern Art as the inaugural installation in a series on performance art. But formal recognition of Mr. Hsieh (pronounced shay), who is now a 58-year-old American citizen with spiky salt-and-pepper hair, has been a long time coming. For decades he was almost an urban legend, his harrowing performances — the year he punched a time clock hourly, the year he lived on the streets, the year he spent tethered by a rope to a female artist — kept alive by talk. This winter, owing to renewed interest in performance art, new passion for contemporary Chinese art and the coinciding interests of several curators, Mr. Hsieh’s moment of recognition has arrived from many directions at once. The one-man show at MoMA runs through May 18. The Guggenheim is featuring his time-clock piece in “The Third Mind: American Artists Contemplate Asia, 1860-1989” through April 19. M.I.T. Press is about to release “Out of Now,” a large-format book devoted to his “lifeworks.” And United States Artists, an advocacy organization, has awarded Mr. Hsieh $50,000, his first grant. He is gratified by the exhibitions. But he judges the book, which is 384 pages and weighs almost six pounds, to be the definitive ode to his artistic career. “Because of this book I can die tomorrow,” said Mr.Hsieh. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

]]>
1 March 2009, 4:44 am fd7169cf5c1136b48458b08bac45ae05
<![CDATA["Nazi" Picasso's Stay In NY]]> Found: jury
Time/CNN reports that it may have been possible for Picasso's boy to lead that horse without a rein, but it appears that the Museum of Modern Art didn't have the famous painting on as tight a leash as you might have thought. For more than a year that 1906 picture, one of the high points of MoMA's art collection, has been the focus of a Holocaust restitution fight that also involved another Picasso, Le Moulin de la Galette, this one hanging at the Guggenheim. Yesterday both museums settled out of court with three plaintiffs seeking return of the paintings, which they claim had been relinquished under duress by their Jewish owner in the 1930s. As with most settlements the details of this one are sealed, so we may never know whether or how much money changed hands. And by itself the mere fact that the two art museums chose to settle doesn't mean they didn't have faith in their own arguments. (Or, for that matter, that the plaintiffs didn't have faith in their's.) But jury trials are a crapshoot and for the museums at least, the paintings were too important to lose. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

]]>
10 February 2009, 3:42 am bc8182e962bd4b6e9594ac931c5d7831
<![CDATA[Joe Boyle's Art at Waterfront Hall, Belfast]]> Found: call, opportunity
There is a small number of artists that savvy Irish Art collectors should carefully track in 2009 - and Joe Boyle (a previous Conor Prize Winner at the Royal Ulster Academy) - is one of them. This Belfast Waterfront exhibition fuses three themes. The first is Boyle's response to a trip to China investigating 17th century dry brush calligraphy combined with Chinese contemporary aspiration for a western iconography. The second is the notion that the fragment can intentionally signify the whole - as part of an ancient object may be considered a work of art - despite that not being the original artistic intention. In this exploration Boyle chooses the Eye as the part that signifies the whole in a meaningful manner - presenting an opportunity to explore different ways of seeing aspects of change in Irish Society. The final theme is a response to Landscape which employs notions of metaphor, edge and parameter to explore emotions which we experience and are challenged by what is often a familiar and sometimes threatening environment. Joe Boyle - Solo Gallery 2 Waterfront Hall 2 Lanyon Place, Belfast Tel: 028 9033 4400 Opens Tuesday 3rd February (7pm- 9pm) until 27th February 2009 Irish Art

]]>
25 January 2009, 4:10 pm 4b446c25110586cb155c74a9f1c63bcf
<![CDATA[Irish Art Thieves Took Taxi]]> Found: residence
Bungling Irish art thieves led Gardai to their door last weekend when they brought their loot home in a taxicab. Two men were apprehended at a residence in Kilmore following the theft of three paintings. It is believed that the thieves were easily located after they hired a taxi to ferry them, and two of the paintings home following the robbery. According to Gardai a plate glass window in Greenacres was smashed and paintings removed from the display. Gardai this week said that while investigations into the matter are 'not yet complete', they are 'not looking for anyone else in connection with the matter'. (For full source and full article click the Headline). Irish Art

]]>
9 November 2008, 11:43 pm 8b31fd7fd4d3a323e3af8af918d320de
<![CDATA[Lakefront Festival of Art - Milwaukee, Wisconsin]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$10,500 in awards. Deadline: November 25, 2014

]]>
135b845e2e3a1f3f1040cfcb2581b93b
<![CDATA[Emerging Artists 2015 - Hudson, New York]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibition and $2400 in publication awards. Deadline: November 30, 2014

]]>
8d80c3149f4d6934fa0c0150778f8ef5
<![CDATA[International Call for Entry, Black and White 2014 - New York, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 total awards. Deadline: November 23, 2014

]]>
74954a3565f43253b1e565b1e562a39b
<![CDATA[NOAPS International Fall 2014 Online exhibition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2400 in cash awards. Deadline: December 1, 2014

]]>
3893fa75eed273a1bad5e460fc611e52
<![CDATA[9th Arte Laguna Prize - international art contest - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline
Cash prizes of 7,000 euro each; 5 Artist Residencies; 4 Personal Exhibitions; and more. Deadline: December 4, 2014

]]>
55c981630bb78402b5a0d8cf24569f3d
<![CDATA[Dave Bown Projects 9th Semiannual Competition - Online exhibition]]> Found: deadline
$10,000 in cash prizes and purchases. Deadline: December 6, 2014

]]>
35867d21f80168fff18732f3e7a45dff
<![CDATA[Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival - Reston, Virginia]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: December 7, 2014

]]>
169327b463a66b72f148d1c95bc31de0
<![CDATA[NYC4PA Portraits International Photography Exhibit - New York, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in cash awards. Deadline: December 14, 2014

]]>
d0ac23124630bbbd57155d0e98b80457
<![CDATA[Four Points Contemporary 4th Biannual Open Juried Online International Art Competition]]> Found: deadline
$1,000 cash prize. Deadline: December 30, 2014

]]>
1ffe8fafda98169059ccf8ea51072649
<![CDATA[The 3rd Zebra Awards International Monochrome Competition - Online exhibition]]> Found: deadline
US$2000 Grand Prize. Deadline: December 31, 2014

]]>
079680ea36e697d95cd356253889b06a
<![CDATA[International Drawing Annual 10 - Art publication]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: December 31, 2014

]]>
a50bfdaa9e3bf2bbda694956b2a26da5
<![CDATA[Design Wallpaper that's Art - Online exhibition]]> Found: deadline
$5,000 cash prize. Deadline: December 31, 2014

]]>
0684d8cdd888c3e294c888cf85363925
<![CDATA[Embracing Our Differences - Sarasota and Bradenton, Florida]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: January 5, 2015

]]>
162b2beb738015a0eb9b1e879e420aaa
<![CDATA[The Earth Speaks, A Juried Exhibition on the Climate Crisis - Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,100 in awards. Deadline: January 16, 2015

]]>
7b29dc505577cdf2a0143143d3e8e2ac
<![CDATA[Nude Attitude 2015 - Peoria, Illinois]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,500 in awards. Deadline: January 16, 2015

]]>
c52dd0cac01784529016a347e2c1ea25
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 45th International Exhibition - New Orleans, Louisiana]]> Found: deadline
Over $8,000 in cash prizes. Deadline: January 20, 2015

]]>
bea13f99b1e78b19eeb7a0788eeed6f9
<![CDATA[24th Annual Oil Painters of America National Exhibition - St. Augustine, Florida]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$75,000+ in awards. Deadline: January 23, 2015

]]>
f83b14963742d48c70c0f7ae4cd9a09d
<![CDATA[El Paso Biennial 2015 - El Paso, TX and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, MX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Solo exhibition and purchase awards. Deadline: February 1, 2015

]]>
7e5d67c0c93820757c10cdda5120b2a1
<![CDATA[America's ClayFest III - Roseville, California]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3000+ in awards. Deadline: February 27, 2015

]]>
06f00cffb5dc97e6e174577a01713289
<![CDATA[Hull v Tottenham: Premier League - live!]]> Found: opportunity

3 min Elmohamady sees the ball coming out of the air and over his shoulder, so flicks it back to McGregor with a knuckle. Only Soldado minds.

2 min Hull are pressing Spurs’ back four in possession, and that seems right - their confidence is low, and will want to settle into things, all the more so, what with their being Spurs.

1 min Hold up, wait a minute, ain’t nothin’ but tutti-fruity, get on the floor if ya got that booty. We begin.

The players are gathered in the tunnel. Spurs’s are wearing tracksuit tops, menacing in the extreme.

The question on everybody’s lips: is Hull’s most dedicated supporter in the ground?

About time Ben Davies got a run, #imnvhotbqhwy. It’s actually faintly peculiar that they bought him, then preferred Danny Rose is this time.

Apropos of the Gregorian calendar, on this day in 1999, Roy Keane made a mistake. Or, put another way, he’s been clean 15 years.

“We let waselves down at Burnley - in the three years I’ve been here, it’s arguably the worst we’ve played,” says Bruce. He explains the change of formation as “we’ve changed a few things, and the good thing about last season is we adapted well.”

One thing that might help Spurs: sticking with this side regardless of the result today. There probably isn’t an ideal combination, so giving a combination the opportunity to relax and groove might just work. Pochettino, meanwhile, is keeping the peace by blaming himself.

“I am happy with all players,” he said. “I have no complaint with the players. I complain with me because I need to give them more tools to play better. This is my worry.”

So, where do we goooao, where do we go oh where do we go, where do we go, ay-ay-ay-ay-ay-ay-ay-ay, where do we go now aaaaahhhhhaaa waahaaaaaaa:

After losing to Burnley, Hull make six changes: out go Harper, Chester, McShane, Diame - who’s injured - Hernandez and Aluko. In come newly fit McGregor, Dawson, Davies and Jelavic, along with Robertson, Ben Arfa, and Ramirez. The presence of Ben Arfa, in particular, is exciting - not many players in the league have his natural ability, the question whether he, along with a manager, can work out how to extract the maximum from it.

And our teams:

Hull City (4-2-3-1 of sorts, or maybe 4-4-1-1): McGregor; Elmohamady, Dawson, Davies, Robertson; Huddlestone, Livermore; Ben Arfa, Ramírez, Brady; Jelavic.

Preamble Tottenham are well-off, Hull are not. Tottenham play in an iconic stadium in the middle of their community, Hull play in an identikit new ground in the middle of nowhere. Tottenham is in one of the world’s great metropolises, Hull, despite boasting one of the world’s great universities, is not. Tottenham have won many trophies, Hull have not. Tottenham have a sophisticated, fashionable manager, Hull have Steve Bruce. Hull are 15th in the league, Tottenham are 12th. And yet, who’s happy? Football is great.

And increasingly, it’s hard to see a way for Spurs. Yeah, they’ll improve as the players get what Pochettino wants from them, he gets what they can give him, and works out the best way of combining the two. A generous assessment reckons that could take them to fifth - but quite how they get anywhere near the top four is a mystery. The players they need, that other teams have, are beyond their scope, so are relying on outstanding purchases, astounding alchemy, and youthful brilliance. Assuming it doesn’t go like that, then what? Continue reading...

]]>
23 November 2014, 10:03 am 95d9f1aaf25dc71b951c2db444a1191a
<![CDATA[Iran nuclear deal by deadline 'impossible' say negotiating team]]> Found: deadline

Unnamed member of Tehran’s negotiating team says final and comprehensive deal will not be reached by November 24, Iranian news agency reports

Iran says it will not be possible by a 24 November deadline to reach a comprehensive deal with world powers aimed at resolving the standoff over Tehran’s nuclear ambitions, the Iranian Students News Agency ISNA reported on Sunday.

“Considering the short time left until the deadline and number of issues that needed to be discussed and resolved, it is impossible to reach a final and comprehensive deal by Nov 24,” ISNA quoted an unnamed member of Iran’s negotiating team in Vienna as saying. Continue reading...

]]>
23 November 2014, 5:32 am 7820df6aa645e9e33cd735632df0bbc3
<![CDATA[An Aviary of Small Birds review – a beautiful, painful, pitch-perfect debut]]> Found: submit
The stillbirth of Karen McCarthy Woolf’s son is the powerful emotional core of this deft, unsentimental collection

Poetry collections tend to be miscellaneous. They say: all change here, please as one alights from one poem and steps into the next – this is the reader’s undertaking. One of the most unusual things about Karen McCarthy Woolf’s debut is that it is held together by a single event – in a sense, a tragic non-event – the stillbirth of her son, Otto, in August 2009, and it is this emotional core that holds the work together, gives it its concentration, charge and flow. An Aviary of Small Birds is a collection that can, with the exception of a handful of poems, be read as a narrative. Otto’s death gives birth to the book.

There is nothing conventional or chronological about McCarthy Woolf’s approach. In the poem entitled Of August, several pages in, she turns her life into copy – were the subject not so painful – in a playful way. Two agents and a couple of publishers have attended a “panel discussion” at a university. On the train home, a student writes down the synopsis of a novel she plans one day to submit to them: Continue reading...

]]>
23 November 2014, 5:00 am 3c95ad83453dd554260d66e19e9d80b2
<![CDATA[Big, bad tech: how America’s digital capitalists are taking us all for a ride]]> Found: call
The cab firm Uber is just one of many cynical internet giants in a sector that is now revealing its true nature

One useful side-effect of the revelations that a senior executive of the cyber-minicab outfit Uber was caught musing about the attractions of hiring private investigators to dig up dirt on journalists who are critical of the company is that it has lifted the veil on what we might call digital capitalism.

Uber, you may recall, is a lavishly-funded San Francisco startup whose mission is to disrupt taxi services in cities worldwide. It has already sparked protests and demonstrations in its targeted cities, including London, and begun to attract the attention of regulators and municipalities everywhere. Continue reading...

]]>
22 November 2014, 10:05 pm 8f44b3c8c56417b18d5c4a435819ec73
<![CDATA[Imran Qureshi review – a hauntingly beautiful show at the Ikon Gallery]]> Found: award

Ikon Gallery, Birmingham
Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi is a master miniaturist who also has bigger things on his mind

There is a self-portrait in this hauntingly beautiful show by the award-winning Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi that shows him at work, pigment in one hand, brush in the other – so far just like any other painter. But Qureshi is not working on a picture, or upon a canvas, and he does not appear in any kind of studio.

Instead he shows himself kneeling inside of one of those rectangular stone enclosures surrounded by intricate foliage and gold leaf familiar from Indian miniatures. One sees him from above too, a bird’s-eye view of a tiny smiling man working happily upon the floor with the sharpened tip of his brush. The shock is that he seems to be painting pools of blood. Continue reading...

]]>
22 November 2014, 6:08 pm b9d0bd59df033421896a4744e4c1de03
<![CDATA[Rail, road and bus spending is the way to bridge the north-south divide]]> Found: call
While London provides a model of integrated investment, elsewhere growth is slowed by fragmentation and bottlenecks

‘Vomit trains, I call them. They’re very rattly and unpleasant. The seats are like park benches.” The disparaged carriage is well known to rail users in the north of England: this is an ageing Pacer train, wheezing its way into Manchester Piccadilly station.

Raising his voice above the screeching of brakes, Alan Bryson, 40, a researcher from Sheffield, adds: “I think if London commuters had to get on those every day they’d have got rid of them by now. It’s about money, isn’t it?” Continue reading...

]]>
22 November 2014, 6:05 pm 4799907ea2eb37f3a7cfd982de69f981
<![CDATA[Randy Schekman: first, a breakthrough in cell research. Now for one in publishing]]> Found: calling, call
The Nobel laureate who identified how cells transport and secrete proteins now aims to take on the ‘elite’ science journals

There is a knock at the door early on in my interview with Nobel prize-winning cell biologist Randy Schekman at his office at the University of California, Berkeley, overlooking San Francisco Bay. The 2014 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was announced in the early hours, California time, and one of his colleagues is calling by for a gossip. “[This time] I actually slept throughout,” says Schekman.

Schekman shared the 2013 prize with James Rothman of Yale University and Thomas Südhof of Stanford University for his role in working out how cells, the smallest units of life, transport and secrete proteins. Those proteins are much-needed molecules such as hormones, digestive enzymes and neurotransmitters. Schekman’s share of the prize was for discovering a set of genes required for transporting the proteins through and out of the cell in the small packages – called vesicles – in which they hitch a ride. Continue reading...

]]>
22 November 2014, 6:05 pm 5b3f88c2700f0c869ccc8046d0f0a014
<![CDATA[How ‘Goldilocks’ sparked challenge to fast food giants around the world]]> Found: calling, call
As pay protests spread across the US, strikers are bringing their struggle to Europe. Alvin Major ($7.25 an hour at KFC) says this is just the start …

For Alvin Major, the battle for fast-food wage justice started two years ago with a visit from Goldilocks. The man, named for his curly blond hair, was already known to fast-food workers in the predominantly black Bed-Stuy area of Brooklyn as an activist with New York Communities for Change, a group calling for strikes to target the low wages and nonexistent benefits doled out by McDonald’s, Wendy’s, Burger King and others.

The message struck a chord with Major, an immigrant handyman from Guyana struggling to support a wife and four children on $7.25 an hour. Continue reading...

]]>
22 November 2014, 6:04 pm 705419514806b82896c6c0f941ac3f92
<![CDATA[Don’t prick the Christmas spending bubble – it’s keeping capitalism alive]]> Found: call, opportunity
Our high streets would simply cease to function without our seasonal shopping frenzy

Global capitalism, as a system, simply doesn’t work. Russell Brand’s new book provides the proof. As does my new book. And the hundreds of other new books that are just out. And the Sainsbury’s advert. And all the current adverts for booze and perfume, chocolates and jewels, supermarkets and computer games. The gaudy, twinkly proof is going up all around us as the last of the leaves come down. It’s called Christmas.

On the face of it, Christmas seems like the most naked celebration of capitalism – and by “naked”, I mean the opposite: wrapped, adorned, decorated and sparkling. It might be dressed sexy but, by God, it’s dressed. Or perhaps by Satan. Or Santa. Or Setanta. Which is doubtless doing a Christmas deal on festive football with the opportunity to treat someone special to a banquet of motor racing in the new year. This is capitalism warmly enveloped by fur and wool and silk and diamonds. It’s retail at its most meretricious. Shopping as goddess and whore, love expressed with money and love bought. Continue reading...

]]>
22 November 2014, 6:04 pm e6a626cd9a55b40607f7a4f1b91c0752
<![CDATA[Arsène Wenger calls players naive after Arsenal lose to Manchester United]]> Found: jury
• ‘We dominated … but defensively we were a bit naive’
• Arsenal manager also worried by Jack Wilshere injury
• Match report: Arsenal 1-2 Manchester United
• Barney Ronay: Welbeck misses chance to make Van Gaal pay Continue reading...

]]>
22 November 2014, 5:30 pm 7b5714d3b92644321913a97b2f3373a2
<![CDATA[Haruki Murakami: Racing to Checkpoint Charlie – my memories of the Berlin Wall]]> Found: call
The Japanese author on the importance of walls as motifs in his novels

It has been a quarter of a century now since the Berlin Wall that separated East and West Berlin came down. The first time I visited Berlin was in 1983, and back then the city was still divided into East and West by that looming wall. Travellers could go over into East Berlin, but they had to pass through a number of checkpoints, and were required to return to West Berlin before the clock struck midnight. Just like Cinderella at the ball.

Along with my wife and a friend I went to see a performance of Mozart’s The Magic Flute at the East Berlin Opera House. The performance, and the atmosphere, were wonderful. But as one act followed the next, the clock ticked inevitably closer to midnight. I remember racing to Checkpoint Charlie on the way back. We made it just in time, but it was a close call. Of all the performances of The Magic Flute I’ve seen, that had to be the most thrilling. Continue reading...

]]>
22 November 2014, 2:30 am 8642e9dbf44c7acec49b90107970cd8f
<![CDATA[V&A CultureCast: July 2006 (enhanced with images)]]> Found: residence
The July 2006 edition of CultureCast features design historian David Crowley discussing the image of Che Guevara within the context of 1960s culture and politics. It also has an extract from a tapestry gallery talk given by Sue Lawty, V& A artist in residence and an article about the cast of the Portico de la Gloria in the Cast Courts.

]]>
10 July 2006, 4:00 am fcc19779ff82a9ae2204dc9125804c34
<![CDATA[V&A CultureCast: July 2006 (no images)]]> Found: residence
The July 2006 edition of CultureCast features design historian David Crowley discussing the image of Che Guevara within the context of 1960s culture and politics. It also has an extract from a tapestry gallery talk given by Sue Lawty, V& A artist in residence and an article about the cast of the Portico de la Gloria in the Cast Courts.

]]>
10 July 2006, 4:00 am 7f45194f7191090b5a3e8a16ef4292f4
<![CDATA[Ozzie and Harriet, Pulled Apart By The Vietnam War]]> Found: award

David Rabe discusses the revival of his Tony Award-winning play “Sticks and Bones,” along with Holly Hunter and Bill Pullman, who star in it. It’s the first major New York revival of the play, and it opens the New Group’s 20th Anniversary season. It’s a savagely comic portrait of an average American family pulled apart by the return of a son from the Vietnam War. It’s playing at Pershing Square Signature Center.

]]>
20 November 2014, 11:00 pm d59f263b3cebde97b084d5afe0807864
<![CDATA[National Book Award Finalists on the Lopate Show]]> Found: award

A number of the authors who've been nominated for this year's National Book Award have been guests on the Leonard Lopate show. You can listen to those conversations any time. 

Fiction
Redeployment by Phil Klay won this year's award.

Nonfiction
Age of Ambition by Evan Osnos won this year's award.
No Good men Among the Living by Anand Gopal
Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast
Tennessee Williams by John Lahr

]]>
20 November 2014, 11:00 pm 9067de84310964ae00ea8582a2a94859
<![CDATA[The Life of Stephen Hawking, and The Search For Life In Space]]> Found: award

David Rabe talks about the revival of his Tony Award-winning play “Sticks and Bones”; he’s joined by Holly Hunter and Bill Pullman, who star in it. Francis Lawrence discusses directing the latest “Hunger Games” film, “Mockingjay, Part 1.” Felicity Jones tells us about playing Stephen Hawking’s wife, Jane, in the new film “The Theory of Everything.” Please Explain is all about how astronomers search for extraterrestrial life in the universe.

]]>
20 November 2014, 11:00 pm b6275c1d15eb586effcd59b7a05e1681
<![CDATA[Remembering Mike Nichols]]> Found: awards, award

The theater and film director Mike Nichols was only one of 14 people to have won Emmy, Oscar, Tony, and Grammy awards. He made his Broadway debut with “Barefoot in the Park,” and his early films include “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and “The Graduate.” But he was never one to rest on his past accomplishments and always working on new projects. He was a thoughtful, engaging guest, full of insightful stories, and we were lucky enough to speak with him on our show a number of times.

He was on our show in 2012 to talk about directing Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman." Nichols said of the play, "It's the very heart of this country."

 

Mike Nichols returned in 2013, when he was directing Harold Pinter’s “Betrayal” on Broadway. He spoke about how a play is a mystery, and how directing theater is different than directing film: "I think that to make something alive, instead of on a page, is an honorable task. And it turns me on."

 
Mike Nichols on the Leonard Lopate Show in September 2013
Mike Nichols on the Leonard Lopate Show in September 2013
(Melissa Eagan/WNYC)

 

]]>
20 November 2014, 11:03 am 5c8b29bf1e21cf0cfe45400142cb777a
<![CDATA[Why is Turkey Called Turkey? Your Other Language Questions Answered]]> Found: call

Our word maven, Patricia T. O’Conner, looks at the etymologies of some “New World foods” found on our Thanksgiving tables. For example, “pumpkin” comes from Greek (for “ripe gourd”) though it’s a North American vegetable. And turkey is native to North America, but in a roundabout way it became confused with the African Guinea fowl, which was thought to have come originally from Turkey. O'Conner will also answer questions about language and grammar. An updated and expanded third edition of O’Conner’s book, Woe is I: The Grammarphobe's Guide to Better English in Plain English, is available in paperback, as is  Origins of the Specious, written with Stewart Kellerman.

If you have a question about language and grammar, leave a comment or call us at 212-433-9692!

]]>
19 November 2014, 10:43 am e7da5a61bc64278cbc4483d2bbfd25df
<![CDATA[Vocalist Sheila Jordan's 70 Years in Jazz]]> Found: award

Jazz singer Sheila Jordan grew up in poverty in Pennsylvania's coal-mining country and began singing as a child. She tells us about her influences—most have been instrumentalists rather than singers—and about her career in jazz. After moving to New York in the early 1950s, she married Charlie Parker's pianist, Duke Jordan, and studied with Lennie Tristano, but it was not until the early 1960s that she made her first recordings. In 2012, Jordan received the highest honor in jazz music, the National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master Award.

]]>
18 November 2014, 10:25 am 941da04df38f86671981ea75fe04ed49
<![CDATA[Khrushchev Eats a Hot Dog and Why History Is Sometimes Comedy]]> Found: opportunity

In the fall of 1959, at the height of the Cold War, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev spent 12 days touring the United States at the invitation of President Dwight Eisenhower. Director Robert Stone tells us about his documentary “Cold War Roadshow,” along with historian William Taubman, who is featured in it. They talk about how visit was an opportunity to halt the escalating threats of the Cold War and potentially set a new course toward peaceful coexistence, and how it created a media circus as hundreds of reporters followed his every move. "Cold War Roadshow," premieres at 9PM on November 18 on PBS American Experience.

Soviet PreMier Nikita Khrushchev tastes his first American hot dog, complete with mustard, Sept 22, 1959. The Communist boss was asked what he thought of it. He replied 'OK, excellent, wonderful,'
Soviet PreMier Nikita Khrushchev tastes his first American hot dog, complete with mustard, Sept 22, 1959. The Communist boss was asked what he thought of it. He replied "OK, excellent, wonderful," but then added that it wasn't enough. 
(Credit: Courtesy of © Bettmann/ CORBIS/PBS)

]]>
17 November 2014, 11:00 pm 67a3ade9804bfdc78041f3c4820bf654
<![CDATA[Penelope Fitzgerald Began Her Esteemed Writing Career at Sixty]]> Found: awards, award

Penelope Fitzgerald grew up in a provincial English childhood in the village of Hampstead, was known as a "blond bombshell" at Oxford, and struggled for years raising children in an impoverished household. Her writing career did not begin until she was nearly 60, yet she went on to win some of the most coveted awards in literature—the Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Hermione Lee traces Fitzegerald's complicated story in her new book Penelope Fitzgerald: A Life.

]]>
17 November 2014, 1:02 pm c481383cf323d541c154cfc16c0f1d3f
<![CDATA[In Alabama, A Judge Can "Override" A Jury's Decision to Not Impose The Death Penalty]]> Found: jury

Alabama condemns more people to death, per capita, than any other state, and it is one of three states in the country with a judicial-override law, allowing a judge to "override" a jury's decision not to impose the death penalty. In Florida and Delaware, the two other states with the provision, judges use the prerogative very sparingly, and when they do it’s almost always to convert death sentences to life. But unlike Florida and Delaware, Alabama holds partisan elections for judgeships, and judges aim to be seen as tough on crime. In "Double Jeopardy," New Yorker contributor Paige Williams investigates this phenomenon and explores the story of Shonelle Jackson, a death-row inmate trying to overturn the override decision made against him in spite of a jury’s unanimous rejection of the death penalty. The article appears in the November 17 issue of The New Yorker. 

]]>
17 November 2014, 9:07 am 3e053d46767446451d0c6ff41fd2a0ff
<![CDATA[Can America Win the War, or the Peace, in Afghanistan?]]> Found: jury

Acclaimed war correspondent Jack Fairweather discusses America's failures in Afghanistan. In Penelope Fitzgerald: A Life, Hermione Lee traces Penelope Fitzgerald’s complicated life and late writing career. Rabih Alameddine’s new novel is a portrait of one reclusive woman’s late-life crisis. Paige Williams investigates how judges in Alabama impose the death penalty on murderers, even when the jury votes against the death penalty. 

]]>
16 November 2014, 11:00 pm 3cc3970acf9500cfa549bc2f2b07c28d
<![CDATA[Saving the Baldwin Film]]> Found: awards, award
October 2014 - Karen Thorsen and Douglas Dempsey. Karen Thorsen, director of James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket, and cowriter Douglas Dempsey discuss the making of their award-winning documentary, the challenges of restoring the original 16 mm film elements, and the necessity of ensuring access to this powerful film during the digital age. Produced in association with Maysles Films and PBS/American Masters, The Price of the Ticket premiered in 1990 at Sundance and went on to win numerous awards at home and abroad. An emotional portrait, a social critique, and a passionate plea for human equality, its extensive vérité footage allows Baldwin to tell his own story: exploring what it means to be born black, impoverished, gay, and gifted in a world that has yet to understand that "all men are brothers." "On-camera witnesses" include the late Maya Angelou (she reads passages from the author's writings), Amiri Baraka, David Leeming, Bobby Short, and William Styron. Now considered a documentary film classic, The Price of the Ticket has been restored with the help of the Ford Foundation, Maysles Documentary Center, National Endowment for the Arts, and Stan and Joanne Marder. This conversation and the world premiere of the film's restoration took place on October 12, 2014, at the National Gallery of Art. This program was supported by Dr. Darryl Atwell and Dr. Renicha McCree to honor the 90th anniversary of the birth of James Baldwin (1924–1987), American essayist, novelist, playwright, poet, and activist.

]]>
21 October 2014, 8:00 am 93b701510f7c2a1d0b978511751a4d5d
<![CDATA[Jeff Wall on His Work]]> Found: calls, call
September 2013 - Jeff Wall, artist. Canadian-born photographer Jeff Wall first became interested in photography in the mid-1960s. He was struck by the perfectionism that characterized the practice at that time—the idea that photographs should, and must, document the world as it is. Photography seemed to be strict reportage, instead of allowing for collaboration between the photographer and subject (as with cinematography). Films were composed of a series of still photographs, but the potential for collaboration within a single photograph had not yet been realized. In this lecture recorded at the National Gallery of Art on April 17, 1999, Wall discusses his work and his relation with what he calls cinematography. He works with performers and prepares the composition to create an image of something that he has actually seen. Through the large-scale photographs for which he is best known, Wall seeks to tell a fragment of a story and allow spectators to finish the story for themselves.

]]>
3 September 2013, 8:00 am d721a9ec8ccc1bbfb462fe7e23015280
<![CDATA[Bronislava Nijinska: A Choreographer's Journey]]> Found: awarded, award
August 2013 - Lynn Garafola, professor of dance, Barnard College, Columbia University. Bronislava Nijinska, the sister of famed ballet dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky, was a pioneer of the modern tradition of ballet. In spring 2013, Lynn Garafola was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to support her research on Nijinska. In this lecture recorded on July 7, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art, Garafola shares her latest research and thoughts about how Nijinska's life and work not only illuminated modern ballet history, but 20th century culture as a whole. In 1913 Nijinska was evicted from her brother's production The Rite of Spring for getting married, an act that he perceived as a betrayal. Afterward, although she was no longer dancing for her brother, Nijinska still played a crucial role in the dissemination of modernism. The longevity of her career eclipsed that of her brother's, and her work influenced numerous dancers and choreographers. Held in conjunction with the exhibition Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909–1929: When Art Danced with Music, on view at the Gallery from May 12 to October 6, 2013, this lecture was supported in loving memory of Shirley Casstevens.

]]>
20 August 2013, 8:00 am 5df47cc9e8e21a5bb8095e5e029c95e4
<![CDATA[Conversations with Collectors: Robert and Jane Meyerhoff]]> Found: residence
March 2013 - Robert and Jane Meyerhoff, collectors, in conversation with Irving Blum, collector and co-founder of the Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles. To celebrate the exhibition opening of The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection: 1945-1995 at the National Gallery of Art on March 31, 1996, the Meyerhoffs joined Irving Blum to discuss the history and practice of their collecting. On view through July 21, 1996, the exhibition presented 194 works, almost their entire collection of post-World War II art. The Meyerhoffs' acquisitions have been based wholly on their belief in the quality of individual works and not on any preconceived theory or plan. If they were passionate about an artist, they collected his or her work in depth. Their private residence has a room dedicated to each of the following artists: Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, and Frank Stella. The collection is both a tribute to the extraordinarily high level of accomplishment by these artists and to the Meyerhoffs' intuition.

]]>
5 March 2013, 7:00 am f0a4c93d5c20dbb46eab7a09cf4f7c65
<![CDATA[William H. Johnson]]> Found: awarded, award
February 2013 - Gwendolyn H. Everett, assistant professor, department of art, Howard University Gwendolyn H. Everett, scholar and author of the award-winning children's book Li'L Sis and Uncle Willie: A Story Based on the Life and Paintings of William H. Johnson, provides an overview of William Henry Johnson's (1901-1970) career as part of the Five African American Artists lecture series recorded on August 3, 2003. Everett traces Johnson's determination to become an artist, despite a humble upbringing in South Carolina, to his years at a segregated elementary school where art was not part of the formal curriculum. In 1918, during the first Great Migration, Johnson moved to New York to pursue artistic training unavailable in the South. While living in Harlem and working several jobs to support himself, he was accepted into the prestigious National Academy of Design. Noted watercolorist Charles Webster Hawthorne provided critical mentorship at the academy, hired Johnson to work at the Cape Cod School of Art, and sponsored his further training in Europe. Johnson supplemented this sponsorship with prizes awarded by the academy and funds earned working for Ashcan School painter George Luks. In 1920s Paris, Johnson lived in the former studio of James McNeill Whistler and became acquainted with Henry O. Tanner, an African American expatriate artist who had achieved international acclaim and who would become a pivotal figure in Johnson's rise to prominence. Follow along as Everett illustrates Johnson's journey—marked by determination, strengthened by hard work, and bolstered by the support of influential artists—that led him to become one of the greatest American artists of the 20th century.

]]>
19 February 2013, 7:00 am 2321c0b603bb514a53c5b2125b31d6d6
<![CDATA[Artists in Residence: Henry O. Tanner in the Holy Land]]> Found: residence
February 2013 - Gwendolyn H. Everett, lecturer, National Gallery of Art. As part of the Artist in Residence lecture series, Gwendolyn H. Everett focused on Henry Ossawa Tanner's (1859-1937) visits to the Holy Land, and how this travel affected the later religious paintings for which he achieved international recognition. In this podcast recorded on August 9, 1987, Everett explains the formative influence of Tanner's upbringing in an educated, religious family in post-Civil War Philadelphia. Tanner's father was a minister and, later, a bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and his mother administered a Methodist school. Tanner enrolled in the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts as the only African American student in 1879, graduating in 1885. His professor, the artist Thomas Eakins, encouraged a progressive method of study from live models instead of plaster casts, which profoundly affected Tanner. after 1891 Tanner resided primarily in France; by 1895 his paintings were mostly of biblical themes, and in 1897 he made his first trip to the Holy Land, where his firsthand experience led to mastery of religious subject matter. He visited the region several times to explore mosques and biblical sites, and to complete character studies of the local population, as he had learned from Eakins. Tanner invigorated religious painting with modernism and with his deeply rooted faith, achieving renown in the international art world.

]]>
12 February 2013, 7:00 am 5ff28065373059eb12f69c3052526c1d
<![CDATA[Roy Lichtenstein's Kyoto Prize Lecture of 1995]]> Found: award
January 2013 - Harry Cooper, curator and head, department of modern art, National Gallery of Art, with original slides courtesy of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein. On November 11, 1995, Roy Lichtenstein was in Japan to receive the Kyoto Prize from the Inamori Foundation. In accepting the award, he delivered a lecture on the evolution of his work since his Pop breakthrough of 1961. Thanks to the generosity of the artist's estate and foundation, Harry Cooper, the National Gallery of Art's curator of modern art, presented this lecture at the Gallery, with the original slides, on January 9, 2013—in honor of Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective, the first major exhibition of the artist's work since his death in 1997. The exhibition was on view at the Gallery from October 14, 2012, to January 13, 2013.

]]>
29 January 2013, 7:00 am 4baccc949c7ba076f8003aa2557ce3ce
<![CDATA[Architecture and Art: Creating Community]]> Found: call, award
June 2012 - David Adjaye, principal architect, Adjaye Associates; Elizabeth Diller, principal architect, Diller Scofidio + Renfro; Tom Finkelpearl, executive director, Queens Museum of Art; Sarah Lewis, art historian, author, and curator; and Robert Storr, chairman of FAPE's Professional Fine Arts Committee and dean of the Yale School of Art. In collaboration with the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies (FAPE) and in the spirit of its Leonore and Walter Annenberg Award for Diplomacy through the Arts, the National Gallery of Art hosted this annual panel discussion on May 15, 2012. Featuring noted architects David Adjaye and Elizabeth Diller, and moderated by Robert Storr, the program focused on how architecture and art bring people together in public spaces. Adjaye currently serves as the lead designer for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, which is slated to open on the National Mall in 2015. Diller, along with Ricardo Scofidio and Charles Renfro, recently completed the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts Redevelopment Project. Also participating were Tom Finkelpearl, executive director of the Queens Museum of Art, which broke ground last year on an expansion that will double its size; and Sarah Lewis, a PhD candidate at Yale University who is currently finishing RISE, a book that "explores the advantage of resilience and so-called failure in successful creative human endeavors."

]]>
12 June 2012, 8:00 am caa2c9eb0c6710abdb7351b947b51a4c
<![CDATA[Solving the East/West Conundrum in Modern Chinese Art]]> Found: call
May 2012 - Martin J. Powers, Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures and former director, Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan. At the beginning of the 20th century, artists in China found themselves in a no-win situation: if they made use of Chinese brushwork, their art was considered "traditional," and if they adapted European or modernist methods, it was called "derivative." We may call this the East/West conundrum in modern Chinese art. Against the background of a long history of cultural competition in China, Martin J. Powers explores several ways in which Chinese artists managed to transcend the East/West conundrum in recent decades. Professor Powers delivered this lecture in both English and Mandarin on February 19, 2012, at the National Gallery of Art.

]]>
1 May 2012, 8:00 am 3a4a845ef21b3ae449ff290350060e5e
<![CDATA[Conversations with Artists: Joel Shapiro, Thoughts on the Organization of Form in Modern Sculpture]]> Found: opportunity
March 2012 - Joel Shapiro, artist. Following the installation of Joel Shapiro's Untitled (1989) in the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden with other major post–World War II sculptures, the artist received an invitation to curate an exhibition of his work alongside the 19th-century sculpture of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. In this podcast recorded on March 9, 2003, Shapiro explains that the upcoming exhibition gave him on opportunity to focus on the continuity of thought in sculpture. Although certain ideas for form in sculpture seem radical and contemporary, their ideas have already been discovered and worked with in earlier times. Shapiro finds that the development of form seems to repeat itself, although it is ever-changing, more or less focused, and contextualized by the era in which it was created.

]]>
13 March 2012, 8:00 am 897af458bedcf0ef2e084562c9199daf
<![CDATA[Conversations with Artists-Compositions and Collaborations: The Arts of Lou Stovall]]> Found: opportunity
February 2012 - Lou Stovall, artist, in conversation with Ruth Fine, curator of special projects in modern art, National Gallery of Art. As part of the National Gallery of Art summer lecture series Five African American Artists: Johnson-Tanner-Johnson-Stovall-Thomas, Lou Stovall participated in a Conversations with Artists program with Ruth Fine on August 3, 2003. "Compositions and Collaborations: The Arts of Lou Stovall" is a rare opportunity to hear Stovall discuss his own work and his collaborations with other artists, and to listen as he responds to questions from the audience. Stovall has been a major figure in the Washington, DC, arts community since the early 1960s, when he arrived at Howard University for his BFA program. In 1968 Stovall founded Workshop, Inc., a professional printmaking studio, where he has collaborated with more than 70 artists over the years. In addition to his own drawings and silkprints, and his collaborative printmaking projects, Stovall is a published essayist and poet.

]]>
21 February 2012, 7:00 am dc89585113d3f4ba620b7d08ebcfc144
<![CDATA[Florence: Days of Destruction]]> Found: calling, call
December 2011 - Bryan Draper, Collections Conservator, University of Maryland Libraries; Norvell Jones, retired Chief of the Document Conservation Branch, National Archives; and Sheila Waters, calligrapher. Recalling the 45th anniversary of the catastrophic flood of Florence in 1966, the National Gallery of Art, in association with the University of Maryland Libraries presented a rare screening of Franco Zeffirelli's Florence: Days of Destruction (Per Firenze) on November 5, 2011. The famed Italian director's sole documentary is a heartfelt call to action containing the only known footage of the flood, accented by Richard Burton's voiceover commentary. The film is in the collection of the University of Maryland Libraries, College Park. Program speakers included Bryan Draper, Collections Conservator, University of Maryland Libraries; Norvell Jones, retired Chief of the Document Conservation Branch, National Archives; and Sheila Waters, calligrapher, who participated in the conservation efforts in post-flood Florence.

]]>
13 December 2011, 7:00 am 55fdbbdb3b91564fd0607107315be7dc
<![CDATA[Morse at the Louvre]]> Found: award
November 2011 - A two-time Pulitzer Prize winning author and recipient of the National Book Award, David McCullough discusses his new book, The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris. In this podcast recorded on September 26, 2011, at the National Gallery of Art, McCullough tells the story of America's longstanding love affair with Paris through vivid portraits of dozens of significant characters. Notably, artist Samuel F. B. Morse is depicted as he worked on his masterpiece The Gallery of the Louvre. McCullough spoke at the Gallery in honor of the exhibition A New Look: Samuel F. B. Morse's "Gallery of the Louvre," on view from June 25, 2011, to July 8, 2012. The exhibition and program were coordinated with and supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

]]>
15 November 2011, 7:00 am faae24724cfa6fcc69ed79e62dc15f12
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 6: Painting and Violence]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the sixth lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on May 19, 2002, Professor Michael Fried argues that Caravaggio's art should be understood not simply as a monument to a revolutionary style of pictorial realism, but also as an investigation into the psychic and physical dynamic that went into its making. Fried evokes this dynamic with concepts introduced in earlier lectures, including immersion and specularity, absorption and address, painting and mirroring, and optical and bodily modes of realism�what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act."

]]>
30 August 2011, 8:00 am b5197218cd11ab04954958eaaa0238f6
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 5: Severed Representations]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the fifth lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on May 12, 2002, Professor Michael Fried discusses how the "violent" birth of the full-blown gallery picture (as seen in Judith and Holoferenes) is figured in Caravaggio's art as beheading or decapitation, an allegory for the act of painting.

]]>
30 August 2011, 8:00 am 208bee2a69d85d49b78f340bed2b3b43
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 4: Absorption and Address]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the fourth lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on May 5, 2002, Professor Michael Fried explores how two polar entities in Caravaggio's art--absorption and address--lead to the emergence of the gallery picture.

]]>
23 August 2011, 8:00 am f1bea4046aff5167520c8b61b34e737a
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 3: The Invention of Absorption]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the third lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on April 28, 2002, Professor Michael Fried argues that Caravaggio's depiction of his figures as so deeply engrossed in what they are doing, feeling, and thinking is revolutionary.

]]>
16 August 2011, 8:00 am cd4ace497aa4170fb490a18d6de77f85
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 2: Immersion and Specularity]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the second lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on April 21, 2002, Professor Michael Fried addresses Caravaggio's engagement with the act of painting, and contrasts that with specular moments of detachment. Fried argues that this divided relationship lies at the heart of Caravaggio's most radical art.

]]>
9 August 2011, 8:00 am 18d65c3b572afe708aed2e326ce3bd8e
<![CDATA[The Moment of Caravaggio: Part 1: A New Type of Self-Portrait]]> Found: calls, call
August 2011 - Michael Fried, J. R. Herbert Boone Professor and director of the Humanities Center, The Johns Hopkins University. In a series of six lectures, Michael Fried offers a compelling account of what he calls "the internal structure of the pictorial act" in the revolutionary art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. The accompanying publication, The Moment of Caravaggio, is available for purchase from the Gallery Shops. In this audio podcast of the first lecture, originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on April 14, 2002, Professor Michael Fried opens the lecture series with a discussion of Caravaggio's Boy Bitten by a Lizard. He argues for its significance as a disguised self-portrait of the artist in the act of painting.

]]>
2 August 2011, 8:00 am 794cf03fc2b84c9a5b50476a47409eb4
<![CDATA[Elson Lecture 1998: I. M. Pei in conversation with Earl A. Powell III]]> Found: awarded, award
April 2011 - I. M. Pei, architect, in conversation with Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art Legendary architect I. M. Pei appears in conversation with Gallery director Earl A. Powell III to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the opening of the East Building of the National Gallery of Art. In this podcast recorded on March 26, 1998, Pei discusses the evolution of the East Building�s design and construction from the time Pei was awarded the commission until the building was dedicated by President Jimmy Carter on June 1, 1978.

]]>
12 April 2011, 8:00 am fb5219651d35827281a6a2a1345c2e2f
<![CDATA[Film Design: Translating Words into Images]]> Found: award
January 2011 - Patrizia von Brandenstein, Academy Award�winning production designer. Production designers define the appearance of a film, bringing to life written scripts by working with producers, directors, and their crews to achieve the desired look of a picture. Academy Award winner Patrizia von Brandenstein shared her practical knowledge of production design and used clips from several of her films, including Amadeus (1984), Six Degrees of Separation (1993), and The Last Station (2010), to illustrate the result of many years of research and visual interpretation.

]]>
25 January 2011, 7:00 am 7013b1fdf9ab32517260ffbd49995951
<![CDATA[Martin Puryear: "Sculpture that Tries to Describe Itself to the World"]]> Found: opportunity
September 2010 - Ruth Fine, curator of special projects in modern art, National Gallery of Art. In this podcast recorded on June 22, 2008, for the Martin Puryear retrospective exhibition opening at the National Gallery of Art, curator Ruth Fine discusses the work of District of Columbia native Martin Puryear. The retrospective included 46 sculptures made between 1975 and 2007. The first exhibition in the Gallery's history to be installed in both the East and West Buildings, it provided a unique opportunity to view Puryear's sculpture in modern and classical settings. Fine discusses the installation process for Puryear's work at the Gallery, designed in collaboration with the artist, as well as the intentions behind the placement of sculptures.

]]>
28 September 2010, 8:00 am 34d1a812d7c4996e580c69657338ea89
<![CDATA[Graft by Roxy Paine]]> Found: calls, call
December 2009, Behind the Scenes - Molly Donovan, associate curator, department of modern and contemporaryart, National Gallery of Art, Washington. In 2009 the National Gallery of Art commissioned American sculptor Roxy Paine to create a stainless steel Dendroid, as the artist calls his series of treelike sculptures, for the Sculpture Garden. In this podcast produced on the occasion of the completed work�the first contemporary sculpture installed in the Sculpture Garden in the nearly 10 years since it opened�associate curator Donovan talks to host Barbara Tempchin about Graft.

]]>
8 December 2009, 7:00 am 0bf543506e49330314f518a1ea4791b6
<![CDATA[Telling the Edward Hopper Story]]> Found: award
September 2007, Backstory - Guest: Carroll Moore, film and video producer, National Gallery of Art. The iconic paintings and artistic impact of Edward Hopper are the subject of a new documentary film that accompanies the exhibition Edward Hopper on its Boston-Washington-Chicago tour. Award-winning producer Carroll Moore speaks with Tempchin about the making of this illuminating film.

]]>
3 September 2007, 8:00 am b0e81bbdb22d778cef5c101b2de22f13
<![CDATA[Sotheby's CEO Steps Down, ArtPrize Heads to Dallas, and More]]> Found: calling, call, award
Sotheby's CEO Steps Down, ArtPrize Heads to Dallas, and More

— Sotheby’s CEO Steps Down: William Ruprecht will leave his post at Sotheby’s after 14 years as CEO and 34 years with the company. Though the press release issued by Sotheby’s speaks of calm transition and mutual agreement, other sources report a fraught power struggle between Ruprecht and recently added board member Dan Loeb, who spoke out 13 months ago against Ruprecht’s leadership, calling the company “an old master painting in desperate need of restoration.” Apparently, since the decision was announced, Sotheby’s shares have already risen. [WSJNYTFT]

— ArtPrize Heads to Dallas: After establishing itself as the country’s largest art award, with more than $500,000 distributed to artists and 400,000 visitors this past year, ArtPrize has announced its first expansion from Grand Rapids, Michigan, with a new edition planned for April 2016 in Dallas, Texas. The 19-day event will focus on artists from the southwest, giving a boost to local talent — not to mention that the 2014 ArtPrize generated a reported $22.2 million in economic impact for its host city. [ARTnewsNYO]

— Colonial Williamsburg Seeks $600 Million: Launched privately in 2009, the ambitious capital campaign is already halfway to its goal with over $300 million, and as of this Saturday, the effort is going public. The money raised will go in part toward expanding the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg — including the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum and the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum — adding 8,000 square feet of new gallery space at a cost of around $40 million. Other funds will bolster programming at the history museum and restore local historic sites. [NYTWP]

— Did Shell Steal an Artist’s Idea? Kurt Perschke, whose “RedBall” project consists of placing large red spheres in cities worldwide, claims a Shell ad featuring a similar image ripped him off: “Even though it might seem that a ball would be a ball would be ball, [my] red ball is specific in the way it is constructed and built and these graphics that they have created are spot on.” [Guardian]

— A New Space for Artists of Color: “Generally, when you see minority representation of artists, they’re in shows all together, and those shows seem to be about their identity, specifically. So we want to get away from that. Even though we are showcasing artists of color, we want the subject matter to expand beyond just our reflection of how we are perceived in society,” said filmmaker Dawne Langford of Quota, his new pop-up gallery in Washington, DC. [WP]

— Classic Images Recreated: IKEA unveiled a series of Edward Hopper tributes featuring its furniture, while the Tate Gallery partnered with cube-based computer game Minecraft to create interactive 3D renditions of its works. [IndependentBBC]

— The Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art and the new Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami (now officially split from North Miami’s Museum of Contemporary Art) announced their 2015–16 programming. [LATARTnews]

— Canadian artist William Kurelek once traded a painting for an apple strudel — and now, that painting is poised to sell for $15,000-20,000 at auction. [Globe and Mail]

— Petzel Gallery signed Adam McEwen, while Lisson Gallery took on Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin. [ARTnewsARTnews]

ALSO ON ARTINFO

$44m Georgia O’Keeffe Painting Shatters Records at Sotheby’s

Studio Tracks: Sean Landers’s Refreshingly Unironic Playlist

“The Death of a Director”: An Appreciation of Mike Nichols

Sullen Teenage Iranian Vampire: “A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night”

Check our blog IN THE AIR for breaking news throughout the day.

William Ruprecht
Published: November 21, 2014

]]>
21 November 2014, 9:03 am 4ada71fdd7f408b1971d2a4203a84f13
<![CDATA[Take Our #KidstoWork Day: An exhibition of AGO careers]]> Found: residence

By Brittany Reynolds, assistant, Recruitment, Training and Volunteer Programs

Touring the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize 2014 Exhibition.
Talking marketing with Angela Olano.
In the kitchen with Chef Renee.
Goofing around in the Kids' Gallery.

On Nov. 5, 2014, eight of our employees’ Grade 9 relatives joined us for the day and had the chance to see the variety of career opportunities here at the AGO.

The day kicked off with a tour of the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize 2014 Exhibition by project assistant Danielle St-Amour, where the students learned more about different styles of photography and the importance of the Prize at the AGO.

Then they met with marketing manager Angela Olano to discuss more about promoting AGO exhibitions, and they were tasked with creating a plan to advertise the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize to their high school peers.

To end the morning, executive sous chef Renee Bellefeuille taught the students how to prepare profiteroles to make their very own chocolate éclairs. Students also had the chance to create their own menu that would include a starter and main course before their chocolate éclair dessert.

The afternoon’s activities included a vault tour by registrar Cindy Brouse and a tour of the conservation lab by sculpture and decorative arts conservator Lisa Ellis.

Last but certainly not least, the manager of our artist-in-residence and adult programs, Paola Poletto, spoke to students about the upcoming Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibition and the group brainstormed what types of youth programs would be appealing to students in their high schools.

Thank you to all who participated in the AGO’s Take Our Kids to Work Program! This year marked the 20th anniversary of the program, which was started by The Learning Partnership in 1994 and gives Grade 9 students a headstart on their future by helping them explore career options and connecting them directly with the world of work.

Search the hashtag #KidsToWork on Twitter and Instagram to see what happened at other workplaces this year.

]]>
10 November 2014, 12:14 pm a2d40b8c45d7f5b6bc254093c721e36b
<![CDATA[Take Our #KidstoWork Day: An exhibition of AGO careers]]> Found: residence

By Brittany Reynolds, assistant, Recruitment, Training and Volunteer Programs

Touring the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize 2014 Exhibition.
Talking marketing with Angela Olano.
In the kitchen with Chef Renee.
Goofing around in the Kids' Gallery.

On Nov. 5, 2014, eight of our employees’ Grade 9 relatives joined us for the day and had the chance to see the variety of career opportunities here at the AGO.

The day kicked off with a tour of the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize 2014 Exhibition by project assistant Danielle St-Amour, where the students learned more about different styles of photography and the importance of the Prize at the AGO.

Then they met with marketing manager Angela Olano to discuss more about promoting AGO exhibitions, and they were tasked with creating a plan to advertise the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize to their high school peers.

To end the morning, executive sous chef Renee Bellefeuille taught the students how to prepare profiteroles to make their very own chocolate éclairs. Students also had the chance to create their own menu that would include a starter and main course before their chocolate éclair dessert.

The afternoon’s activities included a vault tour by registrar Cindy Brouse and a tour of the conservation lab by sculpture and decorative arts conservator Lisa Ellis.

Last but certainly not least, the manager of our artist-in-residence and adult programs, Paola Poletto, spoke to students about the upcoming Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibition and the group brainstormed what types of youth programs would be appealing to students in their high schools.

Thank you to all who participated in the AGO’s Take Our Kids to Work Program! This year marked the 20th anniversary of the program, which was started by The Learning Partnership in 1994 and gives Grade 9 students a headstart on their future by helping them explore career options and connecting them directly with the world of work.

Search the hashtag #KidsToWork on Twitter and Instagram to see what happened at other workplaces this year.

]]>
10 November 2014, 12:14 pm a2d40b8c45d7f5b6bc254093c721e36b
<![CDATA[Join us for the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement]]> Found: awarded, award
The crowd at last year's Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement, Nov. 7, 2013.

The crowd at last year’s Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement, Nov. 7, 2013.

This Wednesday, October 29, join the AGO, Aimia, the Walrus Foundation and host Garvia Bailey for the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement. The public voting period, which began in August, ends at 11:59 p.m. tonight, and one of the Prize’s four shortlisted artists will be awarded $50,000 at the private event. Watch the livestream starting at 7 p.m. watch the livestream on the Aimia | Photography Prize homepage or The Walrus‘s website.

And, if you haven’t yet, cast your vote!


Image via Twitter.

Image via Twitter.


About Garvia Bailey
Garvia Bailey has been a broadcast journalist for more than 10 years and currently hosts Good Morning Toronto on JAZZ.FM91. She spent 10 years with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. She got her start in the world of independent film with the start up production company Channel Zero – telling stories of social unrest around the world and with the CBC, she served as the host of Canada Live and Radio 2 Top 20 on CBC Radio 2, Backstage Pass on CBC-TV, Big City Small World and was a contributor at cbcmusic.ca. Throughout her career in broadcasting she has turned the spotlight on emerging talent from across the GTA and has interviewed many celebrated international artists including Jimmy Cliff, Maestro Fresh Wes, Russell Peters, Melanie Fiona and M.I.A.

Follow Garvia on Twitter

]]>
27 October 2014, 9:35 am 866969ccf22cc0d3f79093049755abb3
<![CDATA[Join us for the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement]]> Found: awarded, award
The crowd at last year's Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement, Nov. 7, 2013.

The crowd at last year’s Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement, Nov. 7, 2013.

This Wednesday, October 29, join the AGO, Aimia, the Walrus Foundation and host Garvia Bailey for the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize winner announcement. The public voting period, which began in August, ends at 11:59 p.m. tonight, and one of the Prize’s four shortlisted artists will be awarded $50,000 at the private event. Watch the livestream starting at 7 p.m. watch the livestream on the Aimia | Photography Prize homepage or The Walrus‘s website.

And, if you haven’t yet, cast your vote!


Image via Twitter.

Image via Twitter.


About Garvia Bailey
Garvia Bailey has been a broadcast journalist for more than 10 years and currently hosts Good Morning Toronto on JAZZ.FM91. She spent 10 years with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. She got her start in the world of independent film with the start up production company Channel Zero – telling stories of social unrest around the world and with the CBC, she served as the host of Canada Live and Radio 2 Top 20 on CBC Radio 2, Backstage Pass on CBC-TV, Big City Small World and was a contributor at cbcmusic.ca. Throughout her career in broadcasting she has turned the spotlight on emerging talent from across the GTA and has interviewed many celebrated international artists including Jimmy Cliff, Maestro Fresh Wes, Russell Peters, Melanie Fiona and M.I.A.

Follow Garvia on Twitter

]]>
27 October 2014, 9:35 am 866969ccf22cc0d3f79093049755abb3
<![CDATA[Art on wheels: Meet the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize Art Truck]]> Found: opportunity, residency, award

For the first time, the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize is bringing its talented finalists to the streets. The travelling Aimia | AGO Photography Prize Art Truck will feature video footage of the four shortlisted artists discussing their practices, offering a glimpse into their artwork and allowing visitors an opportunity to vote for who should win the $50,000 prize. Track the location of the Art Truck using the hashtag #ArtIsMoving or follow the Prize on Twitter @AimiaAGOPrize.

The Art Truck arrives in Toronto on Sept. 27, 2014, making its first stop at the Sony Centre for the Performing Arts on Front Street East and continues onto a number of locations across the city.

The Art Truck was created to break the Prize out of gallery walls and making it accessible by all who walk by. Voters will have the opportunity to win an expenses-paid trip to Toronto, a private tour with an AGO curator, dinner for two at the AGO’s FRANK restaurant, tickets to the exclusive winner announcement and 15,000 Aeroplan® Miles.

Making appearances at several key locations and festivals across Toronto, the Art Truck can be found at:

The Prize, co-presented by Aimia and the AGO, will award each of the four artists a six-week artist residency in Canada and will feature their work in an AGO exhibition, on now through Jan. 4, 2015. The winner will be chosen by public vote via the Prize’s website and Facebook page until Oct. 27, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. The winner will be announced on Oct. 29, 2014, at the AGO, and the Art Truck offers a unique way of voting by using iPads, so that all visitors to the truck can have their say.

The 2014 finalists are:

  • David Hartt (Canada);
  • Elad Lassry (Israel/USA);
  • Nandipha Mntambo (South Africa); and
  • Lisa Oppenheim (USA).

Search for #ArtIsMoving on Twitter to follow the Art Truck around town. For updates on the Prize, further details on the shortlisted artists and additional information, please visit AimiaAGOPhotographyPrize.com and follow @AimiaAGOPrize on Twitter.

]]>
25 September 2014, 1:26 pm d049e5cb5621d28a52c6e96f88d3c2db
<![CDATA[Art on wheels: Meet the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize Art Truck]]> Found: opportunity, residency, award

For the first time, the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize is bringing its talented finalists to the streets. The travelling Aimia | AGO Photography Prize Art Truck will feature video footage of the four shortlisted artists discussing their practices, offering a glimpse into their artwork and allowing visitors an opportunity to vote for who should win the $50,000 prize. Track the location of the Art Truck using the hashtag #ArtIsMoving or follow the Prize on Twitter @AimiaAGOPrize.

The Art Truck arrives in Toronto on Sept. 27, 2014, making its first stop at the Sony Centre for the Performing Arts on Front Street East and continues onto a number of locations across the city.

The Art Truck was created to break the Prize out of gallery walls and making it accessible by all who walk by. Voters will have the opportunity to win an expenses-paid trip to Toronto, a private tour with an AGO curator, dinner for two at the AGO’s FRANK restaurant, tickets to the exclusive winner announcement and 15,000 Aeroplan® Miles.

Making appearances at several key locations and festivals across Toronto, the Art Truck can be found at:

The Prize, co-presented by Aimia and the AGO, will award each of the four artists a six-week artist residency in Canada and will feature their work in an AGO exhibition, on now through Jan. 4, 2015. The winner will be chosen by public vote via the Prize’s website and Facebook page until Oct. 27, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. The winner will be announced on Oct. 29, 2014, at the AGO, and the Art Truck offers a unique way of voting by using iPads, so that all visitors to the truck can have their say.

The 2014 finalists are:

  • David Hartt (Canada);
  • Elad Lassry (Israel/USA);
  • Nandipha Mntambo (South Africa); and
  • Lisa Oppenheim (USA).

Search for #ArtIsMoving on Twitter to follow the Art Truck around town. For updates on the Prize, further details on the shortlisted artists and additional information, please visit AimiaAGOPhotographyPrize.com and follow @AimiaAGOPrize on Twitter.

]]>
25 September 2014, 1:26 pm d049e5cb5621d28a52c6e96f88d3c2db
<![CDATA[The Other Sight]]> Found: opportunity

The Other Sight at Contemporary Art Centre (CAC), Vilnius

Uriel Orlow, Untitled from the series “What Cannot Be Seen,” 2009. 1 of 2 chromogenic photographs mounted on MDF at a
150 degree angle, 106.6 x 33.6 cm. Courtesy: the artist, Mor.Charpentier, Paris and LaVeronica, Modica.

The Other Sight

21 November 2014–11 January 2015

Opening: 21 November, 6pm

Contemporary Art Center 
Vokieciu 2, 
LT-01130 Vilnius
Lithuania

T +370 5 2121945
F +370 5 2623954
info@cac.lt
 
www.cac.lt

Share

The exhibition was originally conceived to re-read and recollect contemporary history events since 1989, while today in light of recent political developments it acquired a new dimension as the world stands on the brink of a Cold War II. 

The year 1989 was the time of numerous landmark events in the political and social life of Europe and the world like the fall of the Berlin Wall and the beginning of the Post-Cold War period. The same year Swiss scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web, the first SMS message was sent, and the first modern GPS was launched. All these events mark the beginning of a new united Europe and the globalization. By bridging these world-changing actions and artistic creation the project introduces a new generation of artists and their works.

The projects on view comprise a range of approaches to contemporary history through personal experience including videos, objects, photography, performance and installations showing artists’ reflections on recent history. The exhibition intends to educate viewers about historical fiction and documentary elements that are full of historical connotations and references to contemporary social issues and popular forms of narration. 

Some installations, such as Katinka Bock’s Horizontal Alphabet or Martin Neumaier’s Das abenteuerliche Herz present a unique relationship between the objects, and the local and historical contexts. Virginie Jassef’s photography series “Scénarios Fantôme” question our geographical, spatial and time-stamping, and create fictions, which are ridiculous and horrible at the same time. The exhibition will also feature Uriel Orlow’s modular body of works In These Great Times that explore the spatial and pictorial conditions of history and memory, focusing on blind spots of representation and forms of haunting. Also, Clemens von Wedemeyer’s film Muster (Rushes) is not only bringing memories to light, but also creates new access to reality; or Morgane Tschiember’s new installation Pow(d)er will be presented as an extended unit of current landscape form. It is a metonymic landscape, un-mounted piece dealing with political, geographical and social issues. Its desert landscape, pierced and carved, is trying to define the world around us. Several projects, such as Simon Fujiwara’s oeuvre The Mirror Stage or Wilfrid Almendra’s sound installation George will force visitors to reflect on themselves and their personal life and experience thus helping people to create a portrait of their own attitudes and practices related to personal development and judgments. Ulla von Brandenburg’s video Die Straße refers to family themes and subjects related to human relations. Pauline Boudry’s & Renate Lorenz’s film To Valerie Solanas and Marilyn Monroe, In Recognition of Their Desperation values the unpredictable and unknowable possibilities that might be activated by not specifying pitches and rhythms. Can sounds, rhythms and light produce queer relations? Can they become revolutionary?

Reflecting on Cold War events and post World War II social environment this exhibition will give an opportunity to reflect and to analyze the past and present situations, and link these times revealing possibilities for an ambiguous futurity. The exhibition investigates how the past influences the present and the future questioning the relationships between historical truth and fiction, and analyzes the nuances and inconsistencies between history and artists’ personal approach.

Artists: Morgane Tschiember, Louise Hervé & Chloé Maillet, Virginie Yassef, Ulla von Brandenburg, Katinka Bock, Martin Neumaier, Simon Fujiwara, Clemens von Wedemeyer, Wilfrid Almendra, Pauline Boudry & Renate Lorenz, Uriel Orlow 

Curator: Julija Cistiakova 

On the opening evening, 21 November, Louise Hervé & Chloé Maillet will present their new performance about social utopias Planetariumas at 6:30pm, 6:50pm, 7:10pm and 7:30pm. The number of viewers per session is limited up to ten persons. The performance will start at George Maciunas’s Fluxus Cabinet. 
The only screening of Clemens von Wedemeyer’s film Muster (Rushes) will be held on Saturday, 22 November at 6pm at the CAC Cinema.


The Other Sight at Contemporary Art Centre (CAC), Vilnius

]]>
22 November 2014, 11:00 pm 68ff1e0ecd4cf94613b267d2c1fac9b7
<![CDATA[Lisa Oppenheim and Karl Larsson]]> Found: awarded, award

Lisa Oppenheim and Karl Larsson at Kunstverein in Hamburg

Top: Lisa Oppenheim, Heliograms (From the Catalogues Of The Kunstverein in Hamburg), 2014. Bottom: Karl Larsson,
Emergency Poem, 2014. Kunstverein in Hamburg. Photos: Fred Dott.

Lisa Oppenheim: Forever Is Composed Of Nows
Karl Larsson: North Western Prose

September 27, 2014–January 18, 2015

Kunstverein in Hamburg
Klosterwall 23
20095 Hamburg
Germany
Hours: Tuesday–Sunday noon–6pm

www.kunstverein.de

Share


The Kunstverein in Hamburg is delighted to present exhibitions by Lisa Oppenheim and Karl Larsson.

Over the past decade, American artist Lisa Oppenheim (b. 1975) has steadily developed a unique oeuvre exploring the use and transformation of pre-existing images. The exhibition, Forever is Composed of Nows, shows her most recent output. Oppenheim’s examination of photography is conceptual: her work engages material and techniques of the medium to question the conditions of image production. She explores photography’s indexical and documentary features and the way in which its technical apparatus is rooted in particular cultural and historical contexts. For her exhibition at the Kunstverein, Oppenheim introduces new materials such as textiles and ceramics as an extension of her investigation into photographic representation. 

The title of the show is a quote by Emily Dickinson and reveals a telling connection to the notion of history in relation to Oppenheim’s practice. While often using imagery from the recent or more distant past, Oppenheim always locates the experience of making and viewing in the present. Consistently in Oppenheim’s practice, representation and artistic process are collapsed. Images are reworked in the light of the literal and metaphorical present. A light in the darkroom produces an image of smoke from some other time that bears only a trace resemblance to the source. What matters is what has changed. 

Oppenheim was recently awarded the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize as well as the Shpilman International Prize for Excellence in Photography.

The exhibition is accompanied by the artist’s first monographic publication, developed in collaboration with Grazer Kunstverein and FRAC Champagne-Ardenne and published by Sternberg Press. The exhibition is supported by the Ministry of Culture of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, Rudolf Augstein Stiftung and Adolf Fette GmbH & Co KG.


How does a work of art begin to signify anything to the beholder? How does its meaning circulate? What narratives support it? The Swedish artist Karl Larsson (b. 1977) mixes an institutionally critical awareness concerning the material and ideological conditions of the work of art with poetic reflections on the existential and emotional prerequisites of artistic creation. In Hamburg, periods, materials and gestures are transferred to a space that describes an actual contemporary language climate: North Western Prose. In this language climate, everything has a function.

With the exhibition North Western Prose, Larsson continues his work in the intersecting margins of writing and language, poetry and installation. These diverse positions have coalesced in an artistic practice that can be described as both editorial and literary, but differs from writing in a conventional sense in its focus on spatial experience, embodiment and activism. Larsson’s application of poetical methodology to sculptural practice establishes a space between the object and the spectator, who is an active part of the artistic scenario. In doing so, the artist challenges the act of perception and questions existing modes of artistic critique to create a setting, in which thinking can start from a new position.

The exhibition is accompanied by the artist’s first monographic publication developed in collaboration with the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, which will be published by Mousse Publishing. 

The exhibition is supported by the Ministry of Culture of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, Philipp Otto Runge Stiftung, iaspis, and MIDAS Metall. Thanks to Galerie Nordenhake.


Press contact:  T +49 40 322158 / presse@kunstverein.de

Lisa Oppenheim and Karl Larsson at Kunstverein in Hamburg

]]>
22 November 2014, 11:00 pm e2a430ebd3ec5c417ff6177d93245e28
<![CDATA[Vitra—Design, Architecture, Communication]]> Found: call, awards, award, jury

Vitra—Design, Architecture, Communication at Philadelphia Museum of Art

Left: George Nelson, Ball Clock, 1948/60. Metal, brass, diameter: 13 inches. Photo: Andreas Sütterlin. © Vitra. Center: Frank O.
Gehry, Wiggle Side Chair, 1972/2005. Corrugated cardboard, hardboard, 34 1/4 × 14 1/4 × 24 inches, height of seat: 17 inches.
Photo: Hans Hansen. © Vitra. Right: Charles Eames, Eames Elephant, 1945. Plywood, 16 1/2 × 16 1/4 × 31 inches. Photo:
Marc Eggimann. © Vitra.

Vitra—Design, Architecture, Communication: 
A European Project with American Roots

November 22, 2014–April 26, 2015

Philadelphia Museum of Art
Perelman Building
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130
Hours: Tuesday–Sunday 10am–5pm

www.philamuseum.org
Facebook / Twitter / Tumblr / YouTube / Instagram

Share

This fall, the Philadelphia Museum of Art will present Vitra—Design, Architecture, Communication, an exhibition exploring the story of Vitra, the family-owned Swiss furniture company, from its American roots and distinguished design collaborations to its architectural commissions and educational outreach. The exhibition of some 120 works will include furniture, design objects, models, publications, and videos divided into the following sections:American Roots; Communications; Architecture/Site; Products/Designers; and Vitra Design Museum, Collections/Archives.

In conjunction with the exhibition, Rolf Fehlbaum, Vitra’s Chairman Emeritus, will be honored by Collab, the group for modern and contemporary design at the Museum. He will receive Collab’s 2014 Design Excellence Award on November 21. Fehlbaum founded the Vitra Design Museum with his collection of modern and contemporary furniture and then expanded its activities to include traveling exhibitions, publications, and workshops. He created Vitra Edition, a program of experimental pieces such as Rod Arad’s looping steel Well-Tempered Chair (1986) and Philippe Starck’s surreal W.W. Stool (1990), which will be included in the exhibition, and commissioned internationally renowned architects to design buildings for the Vitra Campus in Weil am Rhein.

The exhibition will include contemporary products in addition to historic objects and archival material from the Vitra Design Museum that represent the firm’s American roots. These include a plywood toy elephant by Charles and Ray Eames, a group of Alexander Girard’s Wooden Dolls, and George Nelson’s 1948 furniture catalogue for Herman Miller.

Vitra’s founders, Willi and Erika Fehlbaum, began licensing furniture from Herman Miller for the European market with designs by Charles and Ray Eames, George Nelson, and Alexander Girard in 1957. The Eameses view of design as the “recognition of need,” their warning against “stylistic excess,” and their understanding of the connections between people, ideas, and objects have served as Vitra’s guiding principles ever since. The company continues to manufacture such classics, as well as new products by leading international designers, from Verner Panton and Antonio Citterio to Jasper Morrison and Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, which will be on view.

Rolf Fehlbaum joined the family business in 1977. He launched Vitra’s signature architecture program by commissioning British architect Nicholas Grimshaw to design new factory buildings when a substantial part of Vitra’s manufacturing facilities were destroyed in a fire in 1981. Other commissions followed, among them the Vitra Design Museum by Frank Gehry, a fire station by Zaha Hadid, a conference pavilion by Tadao Ando, VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, a factory building by SANAA, and Balancing Tools, a large-scale outdoor sculpture by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen.

About Rolf Fehlbaum
Rolf Fehlbaum (born April 6, 1941, Basel) studied social sciences at the University of Freiburg in Breisgau and later in Munich, Bern, and Basel, completing his doctoral thesis on Utopian Socialism in 1967. Upon completion of his studies, he worked as an editor and producer for the Bavaria Film Company and led education and training at the Bavarian Chamber of Architects, before joining Vitra in 1977. Fehlbaum has received numerous honors and awards, including an honorary doctorate from the Royal College of Art in London (2010), an honorary Fellowship of the Royal Institute of British Architects (2010), and a placement on the Pritzker Architecture Prize jury from 2004 to 2010.

Curator
Kathryn Bloom Hiesinger, The J. Mahlon Buck, Jr. Family Senior Curator of European Decorative Arts after 1700

About Collab
Collab is a volunteer group that supports the Museum’s modern and contemporary design collection and programs. Now among the most important in the country, the collection of more than 2,000 objects ranges from appliances and furniture to ceramics, glass, posters, wallpapers, and lighting. Each year, Collab honors a design professional who has made significant contributions to the field. In addition, the group offers its annual Student Design Competition to challenge college students to be inspired by design. This year’s competition will culminate in a display of selected student works in the Great Stair Hall Balcony of the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s main building from November 18 to 21, 2014.

Support
The exhibition is made possible by Lisa S. Roberts and David W. Seltzer. Additional support is provided by Collab—a group that supports the Museum’s modern and contemporary design collection and programs—as well as Pro Helvetia, the Swiss Arts Council, and PHILLIPS. The exhibition is presented in collaboration with Vitra. The Philadelphia Museum of Art gratefully acknowledges the Dolfinger-McMahon Foundation and Poor Richard’s Charitable Trust for support of the Collab Student Design Competition. The Collab 2014 Design Excellence Award Gala is generously sponsored by Morgan Stanley.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is one of the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art. The Museum’s many galleries present painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Its facilities include a landmark main building; the Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building; the Rodin Museum; and two historic houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. The Museum offers a wide variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts, and films.

For additional press information, contact the press office at pressroom@philamuseum.org or
T +1 215 684 7860. For general information, call T +1 215 763 8100 or visit philamuseum.org.

]]>
21 November 2014, 11:00 pm b91b1fca4f1e27ec603e9efca3810cda
<![CDATA[.3 + 10. MNAC.: 13 years of existence, 
10 years in the Palace of Parliament]]> Found: call

.3 + 10. MNAC.: 13 years of existence, 
10 years in the Palace of Parliament 

Ioana Nemeș, WHAT ABOUT Y[OUR] MEMORY, 2002. Paper object, 18 x 24 cm. Iosif Király collection.

.3 + 10. MNAC.:
13 years of existence,
10 years in the Palace of Parliament

Thursday, 27 November 2014, 19–24h

MNAC Central
The National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest (MNAC)
The Palace of the Parliament, wing E4
Izvor St. 2 – 4
050563 Bucharest
Romania

www.mnac.ro

Share

19h
Deimantas Narkevičius: Cupboard and a Song
Curator: Călin Dan
28 November 2014–29 March 2015
ground floor

Deimantas Narkevičius pulls out the images stored in our heads through the subtle processes of (collective) memory, and translates them into phantoms of a resilient past that haunts mercilessly but gently the present. Working mostly with cinematic means (cinema—the medium of phantoms revival par excellence), the artist remains a believer in the virtues of space as a container of public tensions, and a promoter of sculpture as a healer of historical traumas.
–Călin Dan

19.30h
Bucharest Artistic Education and Romanian Art after 1950
Exhibition on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the National University of Arts (UNArte) 
Curator: Adrian Guță
28 November 2014–14 June 2015
1st floor

An overview of the MNAC collection, with works from the collections of UNArte, the Museum of the Municipality of Bucharest, and other local collections.

“The exhibition brings together works from artists, professors and graduates—some of them later going on to being professors themselves—belonging to different generations of what we nowadays call the National University of Arts in Bucharest; six decades of artistic achievement, from the ’50s to present, and many artistic statements. The visitor will encounter well-known works, while also (re)discovering rarely exhibited ones.”
–Adrian Guță

For a complete list of artists, go to www.mnac.ro.
Project realized in partnership with the National University of Arts (UNArte), Bucharest.

20h
Dispositions in Time and Space
Exhibition generated by the Mobile Biennale 1
Curator: Adrian Bojenoiu
28 November 2014–29 March 2015
2nd floor

Artists: Mihai Barabancea (Romania), Andreea Buțincu (Romania), Anetta Mona Chișa (Czech Republic), Vlad Drăgulescu (Romania), Jonathan Lahey Dronsfield (UK), Bogdan Ghiu (Romania), David Goldenberg (UK), Nicu Ilfoveanu (Romania), Daniel Knorr (Germany), Jonas Lozoraitis (Lithuania), Petru Lucaci (Romania), Adina Mocanu (Romania), Alexandru Niculescu (Romania), Adrian Notz (Switzerland), Daniela Pălimariu (Romania), Mihai Pop (Romania), Delia Popa (Romania), Raluca Popa (Romania), Cristian Răduță (Romania), Alexandra Sand (Romania), Thomas Tsang (Hong Kong), Dan Vezentan (Romania) Exhibition design: Timo Grimberg (Germany)

The exhibition Dispositions in Time and Space brings up the mobility (understood as complex relational factor) and requests the participants to deliver their own discourse both in relation to the present, as a position undertaken, as well as in relation to the movement and evolution of what we call art. Also, another key aspect is how they define their current commitment to art through an unconditional relation to these two universal coordinates, Time and Space, whose absence renders any discourse impossible.

Performances program:
21.15h Anetta Mona Chișa (Czech Republic) / 21.25h Andreea Buțincu (Romania) / 21.45h Jonathan Lahey Dronsfield (UK)

20.30h
New Beginnings. Latest Acquisitions from the Collection of MoCA Belgrade 
Curators: Sandra Demetrescu, Misela Blanusa
28 November 2014–29 March 2015
3rd floor

Artists (Republic of Serbia): Radoš Antonijević, Marta Jovanović, Miodrag Krkobabić, Era Milivojevic, Vladimir Nikolić, Vesna Pavlović, Aleksandar Rafajlović (Montenegro), Saša Tkačenko,  Zoran Todorović, Miloš Tomić, Katarina Zdjelar

The exhibition reunites a selection of works from the collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MoCA) Belgrade, and presents their new acquisitions strategy (after 2001) that sets its focus on post-Yugoslav and Central-East-European art.

In partnership with MoCAB (Museum of Contemporary Art Belgrade)

21h
What About Y[our] Memory
Curators: Irina Cios, Iosif Király
28 November 2014–2 February 2015
4th floor

Artists (Romania): The Bureau of Melodramatic Research (Irina Gheorghe & Alina Popa), Serioja Bocsok, Bogdan Bordeianu, Michele Bressan, Valentin Cernat, Daniel Constantinescu, Alexandra Croitoru, Larisa Crunţeanu & Xandra Popescu, Cristina David, Daniel Djamo, Andrei Enea, Alex Gâlmeanu, Bogdan Gîrbovan, Sabin Gârea, Gabriela Gaug, Irina Ghenu, Delia Gheorghiu, Daniel Gherca, Radu Igazsag, Nicu Ilfoveanu, Raluca Ionescu, Regele Ionescu, Regina Ionescu, Aurora Király, Iosif Király, Signe Lillemark, Claudiu Lucaci, Şerban Manta, Bogdan Marcu, Andrei Mateescu, Vlad Mihăilescu, Gheorghe Mircea, Valeriu Mladin, Marius Nedelcu, Ioana Nemeş, Raluca Oancea, Malina Omuţ, Mario Oprean, Camelia Opriţa, Alexandru Patatics, Vlad Radu Popescu, Lea Rasovszky, Ştefan Sava, Larisa Sitar, Roxana Trestioreanu, Răzvan Tun, Victor Velculescu, Adrian Vinersan.

Opened on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the National University of Arts in Bucharest, the exhibition brings together artists (professors, graduates and students) from the Photography and Moving Image department, established in 1995. It highlights the diversity of artistic approaches, from introspective photo-video research and interactive multimedia installations to performance and institutional critique or social activism. 

In partnership with: the National University of Arts (UNArte), the International Center for Contemporary Art, Atelier 35.

22.15h
Concert PC Harem (in the framework of Cannibal Disco)
2nd floor

22.30–24h Cannibal Disco (party with Scoromide)
cafeteria, 4th floor

The design for the exhibitions Deimantas Narkevičius, Cupboard and a Song; Bucharest Artistic Education and Romanian Art after 1950…; New Beginnings…; What About Y[our] Memory is signed by Attila Kim.

Sponsor: Crama Oprișor

Media partners: Igloo, Zeppelin, Șapte Seri, feeder.ro, Radio France Internationale

“Being Art. Materiality of Art Discourse and Its Extensions”
Conference
28–29 November
MNAC Central, The Palace of the Parliament, Auditorium, 4th floor
Speakers: Matei Bejenaru (Romania), Adrian Bojenoiu (Romania), Giovanni Carmine (Switzerland), Bogdan Ghiu (Romania), David Goldenberg (UK), Justė Jonutytė (Lithuania), Adrian Notz (Switzerland), Kate Sutton (US), Thomas Tsang (Hong Kong)

In partnership with Club ElectroPutere, Bucharest Czech Center

]]>
21 November 2014, 11:00 pm a4bbc1345f1752612a20e99efe2cf085
<![CDATA[Irma Blank and Amalia Pica, and call for submissions for MOSTYN Open 19]]> Found: call, submissions, submission, award

MOSTYN: Irma Blank and Amalia Pica, and <U>call</U> for <U><U>submission</U>s</U> for MOSTYN Open 19

Irma Blank, Radical Writings, 1988. Acrylic on canvas, diptych. Courtesy Private Collection, Bologna and P420, Bologna.

Irma Blank: Breath Paintings
Amalia Pica: Switchboard
Conversation Series*

15 November 2014–1 March 2015

Sean Edwards: Drawn in Cursive (part three) 
15 November 2014–1 March 2015

Gallery 1: Cylch / Circuit
15 November 2014–1 March 2015

Gallery 6: Uprisings
Laura Reeves
15 November 2014–8 March 2015

MOSTYN | Cymru | Wales
12 Vaughan Street
Llandudno LL30 1AB
Wales, UK

T +44 (0) 1492 879 201
post@mostyn.org

www.mostyn.org

Share

Conversation series*
Irma Blank: Breath Paintings
Irma Blank has been addressing the connections between language and visual representation since the late 1960s. Her work creates a form of writing not related to knowledge or meaning—it is intuitive. Through the use of movement in hands and body during the making of the artworks, Blank gives to the act of writing and sign-making a sense of rhythm, freedom and energy. 

Breath Paintings is a selection of works in which the artist links her breathing to the gesture of writing. She paints a line corresponding to each single breath and repeats the action. Blank opens up a discussion on language, body, consciousness and time, and persistently challenges the authority of the written word. 

Amalia Pica: Switchboard
Amalia Pica’s practice explores her background, in addition to communal histories, myths, rites and traditions. Her works include installation, photography, drawing and performance, with a specific focus on sculpture.

Another related subject in Pica’s work is communication. Her work often looks at and uses the act of listening, pointing to its ability to be effective and clear, but also nuanced and fallible. 

Pica’s interest in social interaction can often be seen in the way in which her artworks are presented to, and engage with, the viewer. The act of participation and particularly listening become as important as the viewer’s gaze, which will be highlighted in the exhibition at MOSTYN. 

*Initiated in 2013, the conversation series at MOSTYN brings together two artists and two solo exhibitions in conversation. The intention is to present the dialogue, collaboration or similarity in exploring themes that can occur between artists, and to put this in conversation. The exhibitions by Pica and Blank are linked by the manner in which their work deals with communication—Pica primarily with the act of listening and Blank with reading.

Irma Blank’s exhibition, Breath Paintings, is curated by Alfredo Cramerotti (Director, MOSTYN). It has been kindly supported by Gallery P420, Bologna and the Colwinston Trust.

Amalia Pica’s exhibition, Switchboard, is curated by Adam Carr (Visual Arts Programme Curator, MOSTYN). It has been kindly supported by The Elephant Trust. 

Press release: Irma Blank / Amalia Pica


Sean Edwards: Drawn in Cursive (part three) 
The work of Sean Edwards examines the sculptural potential of the everyday. Many of his pieces make use of remnants of previous activities as a starting point, and reflect time spent in the context of his studio.
 
His found or made objects, as well as his drawings, photographs and clippings, can appear unfinished or at a point in transition before reaching another state. This approach by Edwards reflects his desire to undermine the museum, institution and gallery as places solely for fully realised artworks. While he is interested in the connection between each of his works and the meaning created when they are presented in configuration, of equal importance is the way in which the audience reads these elements. 

Funded by Creative Wales Award from Arts Council of Wales Drawn in Cursive is an exhibition that has three “stations”: Chapter in Cardiff, Netwerk in Aalst, Belgium and finally here at MOSTYN. 

Press release: Sean Edwards


Gallery 1: Cylch / Circuit
Gallery 1 is the first group show of its kind, curated by participants of Cylch/Circuit, working in collaboration with artist Bedwyr Williams and MOSTYN Visual Arts Programme Curator, Adam Carr, with support from MOSTYN’s team. 

Cylch/Circuit is a four-year national programme connecting 15–25 year olds to the arts in galleries and museums. This exhibition marks MOSTYN’s commitment to the involvement of young people in the gallery. 


Gallery 6: Uprisings – Laura Reeves
Gallery 6 is a new initiative at MOSTYN housed in its upper level. It is dedicated to presenting the work of young and emerging artists, all of whom are yet to have a solo exhibition in an institutional setting—nationally or internationally. Four Uprisings will occur each year. 

Laura Reeves’s approach to work, in part, could be compared to the practice of a detective. An in-depth process of research, exploring origin, meaning and purpose characterises her artistic practice and is applied to materials she discovers and uses for her pieces.

#gallery6
Press release: Gallery 6: Uprisings – Laura Reeves
Made possible by the generous support of Esmée Fairbairn Foundation.


MOSTYN is pleased to announce open call for submissions to MOSTYN Open 19 (10,000 GBP prize) from 21 November 2014.

Exhibition dates: 14 March–5 July 2015

For information: www.mostyn.org


About MOSTYN | Cymru | Wales
MOSTYN in Llandudno, North Wales (UK) is the leading, publicly funded, contemporary art gallery in Wales and serves as a forum for the presentation and discussion of contemporary life through international contemporary art and curatorial practice. Through exhibitions, learning programme, lectures, symposia and publications, MOSTYN plays an active role in discussing contemporary culture in Wales, the UK and beyond.

To be kept up to date with MOSTYN’s new programme, please subscribe to our mailing list by emailing lin@mostyn.org.

MOSTYN: Irma Blank and Amalia Pica, and call for submissions for MOSTYN Open 19

]]>
20 November 2014, 11:00 pm 1e2d1f30ea1dcb1854d7d2ee0e5b8e51